Co2 Irony

Mar 24, 2014
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I'm sure that there is plenty produced in the Palace of Westminster, they should try and harness that..............
 
Sep 7, 2020
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And the madness continues.

The UK Government has paid many millions to a US company to keep their plants open to secure the supply of Co2. The reason for shutting them down was lack of profitability so we, the tax payers, are now supporting the US.

At the same time Ineos has pledged to invest £1bn at Grangemouth to improve the carbon capture at the plant. Which they then intend to pump out to be stored under the North Sea.

Wouldn't it be better to have the pipes going inland to support our own industries.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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And the madness continues.

The UK Government has paid many millions to a US company to keep their plants open to secure the supply of Co2. The reason for shutting them down was lack of profitability so we, the tax payers, are now supporting the US.

At the same time Ineos has pledged to invest £1bn at Grangemouth to improve the carbon capture at the plant. Which they then intend to pump out to be stored under the North Sea.

Wouldn't it be better to have the pipes going inland to support our own industries.
It doesn’t really make any difference whether it’s a US company, UK or any other owner. What I find surprising is that CF didn’t warn their customers for CO2 and negotiate price increases, although it’s likely that rising gas prices made the cost of fertiliser production higher than the market would accept and buyers were shying away from that product. .
 
Jun 16, 2020
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Buy an old nuclear submarine and remove the scrubbers, or better still buy this Icelandic installation.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/sep/09/worlds-biggest-plant-to-turn-carbon-dioxide-into-rock-opens-in-iceland-orca
Interesting article. I feel sure there has to be some scientific reason why Co2 is essential for some purposes but can’t be extracted from the atmosphere for such uses. But on the face of it it seems very strange.

re nuclear submarines. Just been watching the new TV documentary. What I found disturbing is that it would seem that while they are no doubt fantastic technology, the maintenance and condition of such basic but essential things as those scrubbers, the toilet drains and kitchen equipment. Let’s them down.

John
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Interesting article. I feel sure there has to be some scientific reason why Co2 is essential for some purposes but can’t be extracted from the atmosphere for such uses. But on the face of it it seems very strange.

re nuclear submarines. Just been watching the new TV documentary. What I found disturbing is that it would seem that while they are no doubt fantastic technology, the maintenance and condition of such basic but essential things as those scrubbers, the toilet drains and kitchen equipment. Let’s them down.

John
If you think those scrubbers are a hassle you should have worked on the type that adsorbed CO2 onto zeolite mineral and then regenerated it by temperature, vacuum or a combination of both. T class are a relatively old design now. circa early 1970s and a refinement of the Swiftsures.
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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If you think those scrubbers are a hassle you should have worked on the type that adsorbed CO2 onto zeolite mineral and then regenerated it by temperature, vacuum or a combination of both. T class are a relatively old design now.
I find the sort of thread drift towards submarines very interesting. Can you give us a bit more insight detail how the scrubbers actually work and the difference between the two types of submarines? If you don't want to add to this thread in case of thread drift, a PM would be appreciated. Thanks. 👍 :unsure:
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I find the sort of thread drift towards submarines very interesting. Can you give us a bit more insight detail how the scrubbers actually work and the difference between the two types of submarines? If you don't want to add to this thread in case of thread drift, a PM would be appreciated. Thanks. 👍 :unsure:
Try looking at Wikipedia for T class and S class SSNs. and search google for MEA Scrubbers, TSMA scrubbers for the principles of operation. They are all the same whether at sea or on land, just look different but the principles are identical.
 
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Sep 7, 2020
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And moving on to Apollo 13. Amongst all the other problems the crew faced was the build up of CO 2. The Lunar Excursion Module was being used as a lifeboat to get the crew home and while they had sufficient oxygen from this the concern was how to get rid of the build up of CO 2. The Command Module had enough lithium hydroxide cannisters to absorb the CO 2 but they were a different shape to those used in the LEM. The LEM cannisters were not enough for the journey home.

Engineers back on the ground devised a way to fit the CM cannisters into the LEM and the outcome was successful.

A case of round hole, square peg.
 
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Jun 16, 2020
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You can still but plenty of carbon dioxide fire extinguishers. Halon was banned years ago on account of its effects on the ozone layer.
I once went on a fire brigade led fire fighting course where the put out an oil fire with one of their remaining Halon extinguishers. It was very impressive.

They made the point that if the fire was not brought under control then far more damage would be caused to the ozone layer.

I think that was mid 90’s, and it was banned then, but old stock could be used.

John
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I once went on a fire brigade led fire fighting course where the put out an oil fire with one of their remaining Halon extinguishers. It was very impressive.

They made the point that if the fire was not brought under control then far more damage would be caused to the ozone layer.

I think that was mid 90’s, and it was banned then, but old stock could be used.

John
It would have been more responsible had the fire brigade sent the halon extinguisher for recycling given that they knew it was being phased out iaw the Montreal Protocol 1987

But there was no doubt halon was very effective in extinguishing many types of fire with minimal consequential damage.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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It would have been more responsible had the fire brigade sent the halon extinguisher for recycling given that they knew it was being phased out iaw the Montreal Protocol.

But there was no doubt halon was very effective in extinguishing many types of fire with minimal consequential damage.
They thought the responsible thing was to keeps halon if only for the brigade simply because it caused less damage than the fires they put out quickly would have otherwise done, and that is the point they were making. Therefore, in their opinion, it was the responcible thing to do. However, I am not sure that their audience would have had much sway towards their cause.

John
 
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Sep 7, 2020
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Anyone remember a while back that there was a shortage of Nitrogen gas that was affecting the food industry. I noticed this when it was a bit harder to get Warburtons Crumpets and this was the given reason. They're sealed in the packaging along with Nitrogen gas.

What a strange world we've made for ourselves.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Anyone remember a while back that there was a shortage of Nitrogen gas that was affecting the food industry. I noticed this when it was a bit harder to get Warburtons Crumpets and this was the given reason. They're sealed in the packaging along with Nitrogen gas.

What a strange world we've made for ourselves.
I thought it was carbon dioxide a by product of fertilise production. The Government gave three weeks support to enable the plant to start up again and give users time to source alternate supplies. Three weeks must be about up.
 
Sep 7, 2020
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I thought it was carbon dioxide a by product of fertilise production. The Government gave three weeks support to enable the plant to start up again and give users time to source alternate supplies. Three weeks must be about up.
It was Co2 primarily but also Nitrogen.
 
Nov 16, 2015
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Mrs H, purchased some lovely Beef steaks from Donald Russells, they arrived, frozen, in a polystyrene box, which had a depleted bag marked "dry Ice" solid carbon diOxide, as the cooling agent for travelling.
Fantastic steaks by the way, and a BOGOF, deal.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Mrs H, purchased some lovely Beef steaks from Donald Russells, they arrived, frozen, in a polystyrene box, which had a depleted bag marked "dry Ice" solid carbon diOxide, as the cooling agent for travelling.
Fantastic steaks by the way, and a BOGOF, deal.
We have them and they are top quality too.
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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We have them and they are top quality too.
They should be at those eye watering prices. Our favourite is rump steak however at the moment I can only eat fillet. We pay about £40 per kg for the fillet steak and it is excellent. Normally only buy about 4 pieces or about £20.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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There is no irony as there is certainly no lack of CO2, indeed it is a growing problem, it's just "canning" it for use, that is the issue.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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They should be at those eye watering prices. Our favourite is rump steak however at the moment I can only eat fillet. We pay about £40 per kg for the fillet steak and it is excellent. Normally only buy about 4 pieces or about £20.
4 ounce steaks, a mere canapé
 

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