Delamination.Cosmetic/Serious problem?

Jun 16, 2005
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I have delamination near the kitchen sink,caused i assume because it is a heavy used area. Is delamination a problem or is it just a cosmetic problem?
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Ian - you have just described my problem.

My understanding is that delamination is a problem in that once started it will not stop ultimately leeding to possible water ingress and a worthless caravan.

My previous topic asked for feedback on one of the treatments that I have read about. Having used epoxy resins on other things I can see how they would work. The prospect of making my slightly springy floor impervious to anything and rock solid is very attractive.

Unfortunatley it would seem that no one has any experience of using the kit.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Delamination should not be the result of heavy usage. It is nearly always caused by dampness getting into the wood. In view of the fact that it is occurring near the sink, it would suggest that either there is a water leak somewhere or water is being splashed on to the floor when washing up and this is finding its way through to the floor substrate at an unsealed joint or gap. If the affected area is small, the problem is only cosmetic (discolouration/swelling), but nevertheless something should be done quickly before it develops into a real structural problem.
 
Apr 4, 2005
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Hi Ian

We had this problem on the floor near the sink/cooker and it covered about 2ft x 2ft. We have a local caravan repair man and he took the carpet up and injected it and sorted the problem. It cost us about
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hi

Delamination is usually found where the most trafic is, either by the door of cooking area.

It needs to be sorted as soon as possible as the area will get larger and evenualy the floor will not take the weight.

The floor is made up from two layers of hardboard with polistyrine (spelling) in the middle. It's all glued together to make a very strong and light floor with good insulation. Delamination occurs when the glue becomes un-stuck. The way to treat it is by drilling holes through the board and stopping just before the second board. Glue is then forced through and weights applied during the setting process.

I'd leave this work to the experts and it costs about
 
Mar 14, 2005
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You may be describing a more modern caravan than mine but I can assure you that the floor on mine is entirely made of large sheets of multiply wood.

I think you may be confused with the walls of the caravan which do have a polystyrene sandwhich structure.
 
Aug 2, 2006
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Hi Clive, If indeed your for is not of a bonded construction ie,just sheets of plywood, then buying a delamination kit is a waste,what you need to do is determine from underneath the van where the weakness is and see if you can strengthen the floor by means of supplementry timbers always bearing in mind the weight factor,please be aware unless the floor is bonded injecting resin won't cure it.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Sorry guys we are slipping into the world of fantasy here!

It is the original bonding of the laminated multyply wood that fails in a De-laminated floor - Hence the descriptive name???

Your cars windscreen is a laminated structure of glass and plastic to prevent shattering. Marine Ply (very close to what is used on caravan floors) is imensly stong because the various layers of wood ply are bonded together with the grain running in alternate directions.

What do you think a bonded floor is made of? (I ask of GW Metcalfe)

A caravans floor is made of a multiply stucture but over time the bond between the various layers of ply break down due to water ingress or wear. So my floor is a "bonded" floor as I understand all are.

The repair kits consist of an epoxy resin (stronger than what was available in years past) which you inject into predrilled holes so that the resin oozes throught the layers in the ply to appear in adjacent holes. You then plug these holes and move onto the next.

When the resin sets the laminated multiply structure is reformed and the repaired floor is probabaly stronger than when it was first produces thanks to the development of the epoxy resins rather than the glues that were used in the past.

This repair was coverred in one of the mags a litle while ago

Get a grip guys!!
 
Aug 2, 2006
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Clive, I know what the differance is between a bonded floor and a traditional floor is in caravan trade, traditioal floor is simply an area made up of sheets ply laid across a chassis (as in older caravans) a bonded floor consists of two sheets of thin ply san
 
Aug 2, 2006
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Clive, I know what the differance is between a bonded floor and a traditional floor is in caravan trade, traditioal floor is simply an area made up of sheets ply laid across a chassis (as in older caravans) a bonded floor consists of two sheets of thin ply san
to finish sandwiching polysterene all bonded together in a press, which provides a very strong but lightweight panel,delamination of this type of floor usally occurs when the bonding fails in a smaal area and if not treated spreads and compounds the problem.
 
Apr 4, 2005
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Hi Ian

Following on from my earlier posting re delamination, I have today removed the carpet from our caravan as we are replacing it and I have seen the repair which was done to our floor. There are small holes drilled at regular intervals which have been filled and then the whole area sealed. The floor generally looks in good condition and there is no sign of damp where the repair was carried out as the seal is colourless and transparent, so I am reasonably confident it was just hard traffic. Anyway the floor is now rock hard and well worth the expense to keep an otherwise good caravan in use. Good luck
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Sorry guys we are slipping into the world of fantasy here!

It is the original bonding of the laminated multyply wood that fails in a De-laminated floor - Hence the descriptive name???

Your cars windscreen is a laminated structure of glass and plastic to prevent shattering. Marine Ply (very close to what is used on caravan floors) is imensly stong because the various layers of wood ply are bonded together with the grain running in alternate directions.

What do you think a bonded floor is made of? (I ask of GW Metcalfe)

A caravans floor is made of a multiply stucture but over time the bond between the various layers of ply break down due to water ingress or wear. So my floor is a "bonded" floor as I understand all are.

The repair kits consist of an epoxy resin (stronger than what was available in years past) which you inject into predrilled holes so that the resin oozes throught the layers in the ply to appear in adjacent holes. You then plug these holes and move onto the next.

When the resin sets the laminated multiply structure is reformed and the repaired floor is probabaly stronger than when it was first produces thanks to the development of the epoxy resins rather than the glues that were used in the past.

This repair was coverred in one of the mags a litle while ago

Get a grip guys!!
Clive

Modern caravan floors, well going back at least a decade, are about 44mm thick. This is a lamination of two sheets of ply either side of a thick polystyrene layer (sandwich fashion). The technique of adhering several layers together is lamination. When the top one becomes un-stuck (un-bonded) due to whatever reason, then this is delamination. Lamination is anything that's layered together. No, the others aren't referring to the caravan walls.

"Get a grip guys"? Hmm. I should check the facts first Clive.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Ian

Can you please clarify what exactly has delaminated. I took it to mean the worktop, but everyone else has assumed the floor. They're probably right, but can you please clarify the area.

Thanks.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hi I have repared bonded floors by injecting 2 part glue ,drilling holes through the top sheet of plywood and injecting then placing weights on the floor to hold the plywood down on the polystirene sandwich. I jnow the purist will not agree but i also fixed 5 30mm x50 mm tanalised battons under the floor at the maximumm wear area holding it in place using 75 mm x 6 mm galvanised bolts ,bolt head inside ,washer and nuts outside I did the preperations {drilling etc}before i injected the glue then tightened the bolts up .It worked for me

One thing , do remove the carpet completely ,wear plastic gloves , and a face mask ,gogles etc ,remove any glue that comes up through the injection holes ,it sets like iron

Coljac
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hi Ian

Delamination is a serious problem NOT just cosmetic. In our previous, first, van (Avondale Malvern, which I bought privately and without much understanding, the floor delamination had caused the whole van to loose its structural integrity. The nearside wall bowed out. The first attempt at a repair by a dealer which consisted of him cutting out the top layer of flooring (!!??) failed. After a battle with dealer and Barclaycard, I'd used my credit card to pay, I got the cost of the first repair back from Bcard and had the floor repaired a second time by injection of resin at another dealer. The wall too, had to be strengthened and furniture refixed. That repair was a success but expensive! So whether you DIY it or get a dealer to do so FIX IT QUICK - Don't delay the floor is likely to get worse and can other effects as I found to my cost.

Regards Tim
 
Jun 23, 2005
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Hi Tim,

I've just bought my first van and like you I am where you were originally. The seller discovered last year that he had some delamination problem in part of the floor of the van. He had it repaired in the modern traditional way. The overall condition of the van to my(unknowledgeable eye) is very good and it is certainly dry throughout. But until after buying it I was unaware that the delamination problem can be caused by water ingress, instead believing that it was wear on the floor.

As soon as i can I intend to have it serviced to satisfy myself that everything is in order. I just hope I have'nt bought a pup.

If I have it will be an expensive experience.

Regards, Tony.
 
Jun 16, 2005
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Hi Tim,

I've just bought my first van and like you I am where you were originally. The seller discovered last year that he had some delamination problem in part of the floor of the van. He had it repaired in the modern traditional way. The overall condition of the van to my(unknowledgeable eye) is very good and it is certainly dry throughout. But until after buying it I was unaware that the delamination problem can be caused by water ingress, instead believing that it was wear on the floor.

As soon as i can I intend to have it serviced to satisfy myself that everything is in order. I just hope I have'nt bought a pup.

If I have it will be an expensive experience.

Regards, Tony.
Thanks everyone.The area has spread but it doesnt appear to have spread width wise (i.e.)underneath sink & wardrobe am gonna try Tradeweld Floor kit from The Glue People in Wimbourne as van is 1990 Swift Challenger & not worth spending too much on
 

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