End of a holiday😥

Jun 20, 2005
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A very sad end to a lovely Bailey Senator Louisiana. Parked correctly on a lay . Son had just hitched up his vehicle , replacing parents broken down car. Another driver left the dual carriageway and hit the caravan. Not much left of it. Makes you wonder if anywhere is safe.
 

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Nov 30, 2022
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Some very lucky people there!

A brilliant testimony of why you should never, and I do mean never stand behind a vehicle when at the roadside (or between a car and trailer) That was one of the very first ever lessons I had when I started on Traffic Patrol.
It has certainly saved me from serious injury, or worse, at least 3 times over the years.

I have a theory why this sort of thing happens (especially on motorways at night) Drivers go into a semi sleep state, their brain "sees" a vehicle ahead on the road thats NOT "on the road" and they "tuck into" the same lane to follow it :rolleyes: . In many such instances there is never any indication of braking prior to impact, which I think does tend to support my theory. Doesn't make it any less traumatic fio those involved though.
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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Some very lucky people there!

A brilliant testimony of why you should never, and I do mean never stand behind a vehicle when at the roadside (or between a car and trailer) That was one of the very first ever lessons I had when I started on Traffic Patrol.
It has certainly saved me from serious injury, or worse, at least 3 times over the years.

I have a theory why this sort of thing happens (especially on motorways at night) Drivers go into a semi sleep state, their brain "sees" a vehicle ahead on the road thats NOT "on the road" and they "tuck into" the same lane to follow it :rolleyes: . In many such instances there is never any indication of braking prior to impact, which I think does tend to support my theory. Doesn't make it any less traumatic fio those involved though.
A good friend who was in the police walked between two parked police cars which had their blue lights flashing was severely injured and crippled for life when a drunk driver careered into the back of the one police car. Prior to hitting the rear police car, he also clipped another private car.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Some very lucky people there!

A brilliant testimony of why you should never, and I do mean never stand behind a vehicle when at the roadside (or between a car and trailer) That was one of the very first ever lessons I had when I started on Traffic Patrol.
It has certainly saved me from serious injury, or worse, at least 3 times over the years.

I have a theory why this sort of thing happens (especially on motorways at night) Drivers go into a semi sleep state, their brain "sees" a vehicle ahead on the road thats NOT "on the road" and they "tuck into" the same lane to follow it :rolleyes: . In many such instances there is never any indication of braking prior to impact, which I think does tend to support my theory. Doesn't make it any less traumatic fio those involved though.
Thank heavens no one was killed or seriously injured. Wrt your theory I remember years ago a Trathens double decker on the London to Plymouth route had an accident exactly as you described at night. There are too many such instance for it not to be a reasonable theory.
 
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Jun 20, 2005
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Some very lucky people there!


I have a theory why this sort of thing happens (especially on motorways at night) Drivers go into a semi sleep state, their brain "sees" a vehicle ahead on the road thats NOT "on the road" and they "tuck into" the same lane to follow it :rolleyes: . In many such instances there is never any indication of braking prior to impact, which I think does tend to support my theory. Doesn't make it any less traumatic fio those involved though.
Railways experimented with various rear red lights upgrading from the old paraffin ones. They found flashing red lights on a moving train gave better warning than solid on. Maybe a rethink is needed? That said I assume in this case and yours the hazard flashers were being used?
 
Sep 12, 2021
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Oh no!!!

Thank goodness no one was hurt.


We are going to Norfolk with our caravan in August, I am going to have to rethink our stop strategy to make sure we don't find ourselves open to this sort of incident.

Steve
 

JRT

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We rarely if ever stop in this type of layby unless forced to by something urgent or an emergency as in the the circumstances outlined in the OP.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Railways experimented with various rear red lights upgrading from the old paraffin ones. They found flashing red lights on a moving train gave better warning than solid on. Maybe a rethink is needed? That said I assume in this case and yours the hazard flashers were being used?
Flashing red on a push bike is very noticeable even in daytime. Some Wilts police cycle officers fitted flashing red on their bikes at a time when they weren’t considered legal. Sensibly the Nelson Touch prevailed. But would it have prevented this incident? Not known if hazards were flashing at the time of this incident, but even if not ,it’s not the norm to switch hazards on when coupled up in a lay-by.
 
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Nov 6, 2005
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Railways experimented with various rear red lights upgrading from the old paraffin ones. They found flashing red lights on a moving train gave better warning than solid on. Maybe a rethink is needed? That said I assume in this case and yours the hazard flashers were being used?
Similar reasoning for police patrol cars to use flashing red to highlight their position - but flashing red is illegal on ordinary vehicles.

Sadly, a caravan that's unhitched from its towing vehicle has no circuitry to operate the hazard lights - although that wouldn't be difficult to arrange using the onboard battery - if fitted.
 

Mel

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Mar 17, 2007
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In this instance the poor quality of caravan construction was a blessing. The outcome for the driver and any passengers could have been worse if the thing was sturdy.
Mel
 
Nov 30, 2022
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That said I assume in this case and yours the hazard flashers were being used?

I sincerely hope they were NOT being used!

Hazard flashers to warn of an obstruction on the highway and nowhere else.
Use in a lay-by can/is very confusing to approaching traffic, especially at night.
Rule 116 of tge Highway Code.

Hazard warning lights.

These may be used when your vehicle is stationary, to warn that it is temporarily obstructing traffic. Never use them as an excuse for dangerous or illegal parking.

Note the words "Obstructing TRAFFIC"

Vehicles in laybys are not obstructing traffic, thats why laybys exist, to prevent traffic being obstructed.
 
Nov 6, 2005
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I sincerely hope they were NOT being used!

Hazard flashers to warn of an obstruction on the highway and nowhere else.
Use in a lay-by can/is very confusing to approaching traffic, especially at night.
Rule 116 of tge Highway Code.

Hazard warning lights.

These may be used when your vehicle is stationary, to warn that it is temporarily obstructing traffic. Never use them as an excuse for dangerous or illegal parking.

Note the words "Obstructing TRAFFIC"

Vehicles in laybys are not obstructing traffic, thats why laybys exist, to prevent traffic being obstructed.
I'm sure you're right about the law - but most drivers would use hazard flasher if broken down on the hard shoulder of any conventional motorway - it warns other drivers that there may be pedestrians near the running lane - so I think most drivers will break the law in the interests of improved road safety.
 
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Ans so they should!

But that caravan and car were not on a motorway hard shoulder (which is basically a continuous, but unused lane alongside lane one.
This car and caravan were in a lay-by, off a dual carriageway, which isnt a hard shoulder but a designated pull of area.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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On motorways it’s not uncommon for drivers to put hazards on if the lane(s) are rapidly slowing, or stopped in order to warn following drivers it’s not just a normal braking action.
 
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Ans so they should!

But that caravan and car were not on a motorway hard shoulder (which is basically a continuous, but unused lane alongside lane one.
This car and caravan were in a lay-by, off a dual carriageway, which isnt a hard shoulder but a designated pull of area.
The risk of pedestrians very close to the running lane is just as great.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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On motorways it’s not uncommon for drivers to put hazards on if the lane(s) are rapidly slowing, or stopped in order to warn following drivers it’s not just a normal braking action.
As per Mr Plod's post, the driver is on the motorway and warning of an obstruction ahead so is legal using flashers.
 
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As per Mr Plod's post, the driver is on the motorway and warning of an obstruction ahead so is legal using flashers.
i know that it’s different on motorways compared to other roads, but Mr Plodd did not address running lanes, rather hard shoulder. The present guidance in the Highway Code is spot on.
 
Nov 16, 2015
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If I do an emergency brake , in my Santa Fe the Hazard warning lights illuminate until I cancel them., I must admit it really is a very strong brake operation.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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If I do an emergency brake , in my Santa Fe the Hazard warning lights illuminate until I cancel them., I must admit it really is a very strong brake operation.
My braking lights will flash under heavy braking at speeds above 30mph; so the handbook says.
 
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