How to make sure you don't overload the caravan

smd

Mar 21, 2022
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I'm planning on using my caravan for the first time and I'm a bit worried I might end up overloading. Is there a specific way you load your caravan to prevent this from happening?
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Weigh everything that you want to put in the caravan. Don’t forget to allow for the battery and a second gas bottle if it’s not included in the MIRO. Movers aren’t included in MIRO so that’s part of payload, plus anything fitted as an extra by the dealer or previous owner. IE solar panels. I always used a spreadsheet to allow me to change the inventory payload for short v long trips and summer v winter trips. Fridge food, allow for any water in loo or flush. You have to be meticulous. Once you’ve sorted your payload then follow the advice for loading a caravan noting you need to achieve desired noseweight too.

When you’ve loaded the van to what you think is a suitable payload take it to a public weighbridge and have it checked.
 
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Mar 14, 2005
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Just a further note to Otherclives response:-

You need to know from the caravans data plate what the Maximum Technically Permitted Laden Mass (MTPLM) weight is. That is the absolute legal maximum your caravan can be when it's towed.

In theory if you know the maximum allowed weight (MTPLM) and you know the unladen weight or Mass In Running Order (MIRO) the difference is the maximum you can load into the caravan, and using OC's suggestio of weighing everything you should be able to stay within the MTPLM.

However the MIRO can never be exact, and even due to normal manufacturing tolerances, the actual unladen weight could be greater than the the suggested MIRO. This means for every kg the actual unladen weight exceeds the stated MIRO, the available payload reduces by the same difference.

For that reason do not be surprised if when you check if the overall caravan weight exceeds its MTPLM and it is necessary to remove some of the load you have added.

Just for clarity, the MTPLM is the maximum limit for the weight of the whole caravan, this means the whole caravan has to be weighed uncoupled from the car.
 
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May 7, 2012
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I would say start by weighing your caravan, either empty or with the essentials in it at a public weighbridge. This gives you a base figure and if there is a problem later the ticket will help you show that you have been sensible and tried to get it right. After that all you can do is weigh everything you put in and if away do keep an eye on if you are increasing this for any reason if you are near your limit. Once you have established things like the weight of the bedding and other things you always use, you can check only odd additional things on further trips
 
Oct 8, 2006
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Are gas bottles included in MIRO? I didn't think they were, certainly not with Bailey, neither is the standard fit solar panel nor I think ( may be wrong) is the spare wheel. For their MIRO Bailey specify that all water containers and the toilet must be empty - the fluid allowance that the NCC suggest is taken by the fluid in the central heating system! The only other things Bailey include in the MIRO AFAIK is the step, the EHU cable, and the winding handles.
 
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Nov 11, 2009
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Are gas bottles included in MIRO? I didn't think they were, certainly not with Bailey, neither is the standard fit solar panel nor I think ( may be wrong) is the spare wheel. For their MIRO Bailey specify that all water containers and the toilet must be empty - the fluid allowance that the NCC suggest is taken by the fluid in the central heating system! The only other things Bailey include in the MIRO AFAIK is the step, the EHU cable, and the winding handles.
My last Swift included one standard 6 kg steel gas cylinder, the spare wheel, EHU lead, water pump hose, no fluids, caravan documents, and the step In MIRO. The maker can advise or it may be in the handbook.
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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Are gas bottles included in MIRO? I didn't think they were, certainly not with Bailey, neither is the standard fit solar panel nor I think ( may be wrong) is the spare wheel. For their MIRO Bailey specify that all water containers and the toilet must be empty - the fluid allowance that the NCC suggest is taken by the fluid in the central heating system! The only other things Bailey include in the MIRO AFAIK is the step, the EHU cable, and the winding handles.
Gas bottles have been included in the MIRO since about 2011. On our caravan the gas allowance is 20kg. EHU cable is included in MIRO along with spare wheel. As we have an onboard tank the waste master is included in the MIRO. Our battery is also included in MIRO due to E&P system. Solar panel is also within MIRO.
 

Sam Vimes

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Sep 7, 2020
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For our Elddis the MIRO is the weight as it leaves the factory with an allowance of 2 x 10Kg gas bottles but excludes optional equipment.

The user payload is made up of personal affects and the factory installed optional equipment.

The weight of additional equipment added by the user/dealer such as motor mover and solar panels would be part of the use payload.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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Woodentops comment is classic example of why you cannot assume anything.
Spot on, but we know who has facilitated this confusion and I suspect the savvier quite accurately can work out why.
The UK's NCC, by directly avoiding and corrupting the application of the EU's directive aimed at clearly defining what is and is not in the MIRO.
 
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Mar 14, 2005
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Whilst I agree the water has been seriously muddied over the years on a number weight related issues, and some of the indicators do point to the NCC, trying to establish evidence of said meddling is actually very difficult, not only because no one in the industry will admit to being the instigator or having any control over the matter. and there is often no logic or supporting evidence to the change.

It's a bit like the magic circle.

However regardless of the industries inconsistencies on supplying data to the public, they still do have to comply with the UK's construction and use regulations which still mirror the EU's.
 
May 7, 2012
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One 6.5 kg gas cylinder is included in the MIRO for our caravan so if we carry two then you have to allow for this. I think this varies from one make to another so you need to read the handbook as ours certainly shows this and I assume others do as well. Even then the only real way to be sure on what you can carry is to weigh the caravan.
 
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Mel

Mar 17, 2007
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Get everything you THINK you need in one place. Now be completely ruthless. You probably don’t need half of it. How many plates, cups etc do you actually need? How many pots and pans? Clothes, gadgets and gizmos?
Cut it right down. Then weigh it.
mel
 
Jan 3, 2012
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We had one 6kg Propane toilet stuff and waste pipe/ service pitch connection and spare wheel 2 plates 4 cups (pots and pans do not take) sleeping bags . Aqua roll, EHU cable. awning , then weigh it
 
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Mar 14, 2005
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lutzschelisch.wix.com
The UK's NCC, by directly avoiding and corrupting the application of the EU's directive aimed at clearly defining what is and is not in the MIRO.
There is no EU directive defining what is and what is not in the MIRO. It’s an industry standard, BS EN 1645-2:2008, and even that is open to a certain amount of interpretation by the respective manufacturer. The only reliable way of establishing your starting point is to weigh the caravan empty.
 
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Nov 16, 2015
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After I had a rear panel replaced, I put back all our normal stuff that we carry, took the van to a scrap yard weigh bridge, got the print out, took the van home and removed about 40 kgs worth of non essential stuff to get the van below max weight. ie. Mini ironing board and iron, rotary clothes line, 20 music cds, 20 film dvd's, wooden chopping board, spare toilet chemicals. Spare gas bottle. Lots of little bits and pieces all add up.
 

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