Painting an interior wall at home?

Jul 18, 2017
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Our small 2 bed home needs a lick of paint and we have more or less decided that Farrow and Ball although very expensive may be the best option for a long lasting paint as unlikely we will be able to do any painting again. However if there is another good paint option at a lower price I am all ears!
We want to try and one small room first and see how we get on and if we cannot manage we will need to get in a professional painter obviously at a cost. The current coat of paint is magnolia and we probably will use the same colour or even a white paint around the home to make it a bit brighter. A bit unsure on colour.
I have read various reviews on paint brushes and rollers and must admit I am now more confused than I was previously. Any suggestions on rollers and paint brushes. It is probably OH that will have to do most of the painting as I am a bit limited with my arms,
Any suggestions or hints would be appreciated. Thanks.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I use Harris professional paint brushes and rollers. As for paint it is difficult to gauge quality but I steer clear of the pile em high canisters and if possible go for trade quality which in BS colours gives a good range of makes. Most recent decorating for lounge and kitchen has been Dulux and Leyland.
 
Mar 24, 2014
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I use Harris professional paint brushes and rollers. As for paint it is difficult to gauge quality but I steer clear of the pile em high canisters and if possible go for trade quality which in BS colours gives a good range of makes. Most recent decorating for lounge and kitchen has been Dulux and Leyland.
I would second the recommendation of the Harris professional brushes. I use the fine tip ones. You can get them at Screwfix. As for paints, I used B&Q's own brand for the kitchen and was very happy with the results, although I accept that the range of colours is more limited than some other brands. Unfortunately, I no longer have a Leyland Trade Paint Centre near me, which is where I used to get most of my paint from.
 
May 7, 2012
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I just buy the cheap ones in B&M and if they are hard to clean throw them out. Not environmentally friendly but they work and my skills in decorating are basic.
 

Parksy

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Nov 12, 2009
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When I was a painter and decorator after I packed in lorry driving I used Purdy paintbrushes and Harris washable rollers, but that was for commercial work and the tools were used every day.
Harris brushes are ok for a DIY project.
Our 2 man firm were Dulux approved decorators, and I'd always recommended Dulux trade emulsion paint, but to achieve a good lasting finish always apply 2 coats.
Matt emulsion is not difficult to apply, Silk needs a wet edge all the time to avoid roller lines so if using Silk emulsion allow enough time to apply a coat all in one session.
Top Tip:
With new paint brushes, use them to cut in around edges and to apply smaller areas of emulsion of a similar shade to the gloss before washing them and using them for undercoat and gloss / finishing.
If bristle loss takes place it's easier to remove loose bristles from wet emulsion than from wet gloss paint.
The bristle loss will have all taken place before you use the brushes to coat up the woodwork. 😉
 
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Sam Vimes

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Snap. Just about to start on some of our walls.

Over the years we've tried different paints and can't say there was much difference accept for the Eco Paint we tried last time around. Expensive but had no smell at all when applying. Not too sure about the colour fastness though.

This time we're using Isle of Skye paint - yes Skye has its own paint company. Usually it comes down to who has the colours we like, although Magnolia is Magnolia if that's what you want.

Skye paint covers well but it does smell strongly when applied and the smell hangs around for a couple of days but some very nice shades.

Cutting in always seems to take the time and I use a cutting in angled brush. I've tried low tack masking tape but that doesn't seem to work too well and even the low tack stuff can peel off some paint.

Main walls get the emulsion applied by roller and I tend to use Prodec products. You can get long handled rollers which are good for ceilings and outside walls.

For brushes its whatever we can get at a reasonble price.

Good luck.
 
Oct 21, 2020
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My advice would be to go to either a deluxe or crown trade centre.
Either will sell good quality paints and tools.
Make sure you let each coat dry properly, preferably overnight.

The water based paints for woodwork are easy to apply and durable.
We have deluxe satinwood on all our woodwork and it is so easy to use.

If you must use a farrow and ball colour, take a swatch of it to the trade centre and get them to scan the colour and replicate in a deluxe or crown version.

Kevin
 
Oct 8, 2006
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There are recommendations above about trade and DIY paints so it helps to know the difference.
Trade paints contain more pigment and less carrier (e.g. polyurethane in gloss paints) so that if there isn't much colour change the job can often be completed in one coat - saves the trade time and money.
DIY paints are the opposite so will often need two or even three coats but give a significantly superior gloss finish that will put up with hammer.

The secret of decorating is good preparation. Fill any cracks or similar and rub down smooth, wash walls and woodwork with sugar soap and then wipe over with clean water. Most wall emulsion paint applied with a roller will cover in two coats. Woodwork needs a modern acrylic primer/undercoat on it if there is any bare wood. If you are using oil based gloss then you need an oil based undercoat first: if you are using water based gloss then slap it on over the primer undercoat, but note that water based paints do not give the high-gloss finish that oil-based does, in fact it could often be called a satin finish.

For paints I agree with others: for wood paint especially gloss I use Dulux - it is so much better than any other. However for walls, particularly if you are using matt, Crown trade paint - notably the Heritage range - is much easier to apply and gives IMO a better and tougher finish. Whilst you are at the Crown Trade Centre you can by a roller tray with clear plastic inserts that fit inside it which you can throw away rather than spend an hour trying to clean the basic tray! Get a decent roller assembly and microfibre roller tubes to fit it. They are cheap enough that you can throw them away when you have finished; I use the white with blue trace line, or the greeny coloured type. Also consider a long handled slim roller which not only go behind radiators easily but a a boon when painting the wall in a window reveal. You should also have some clingfilm to roll around your brushes to save washing them and to stop them drying out overnight when you have a second coat to apply tomorrow. If using oil paints don't forget white spirit to clean up with.

I also agree about the Harris (grey handled) brush kits which again are cheap if you have to throw them away. Homebase also do some decent long handled brushes with a slightly slanted edge which make edge lining very easy - and they are inexpensive.

HTH.
 
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Jan 3, 2012
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I use to paint our bungalow and use Harris brushes and rollers but now we have hired a professional painter we pay him £12 per hour plus paint and what ever he needs so far he painted the kitchen and when we are away the lounge is next on the list .
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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I forgot that we would probably need to apply two coats so Farrow & Ball will probably be crossed off our list as that will work out very expensive. I was looking for a tough long lasting paint that does not mark easily and marks can be removed fairly easily i.e. something falling and knocking on wall. We have brick outer and walls made from that stuff where you punch it hard enough, you wil make a hole, plasterboard? .
Thanks for the tips regarding brushes as the last lot of paint brushes we bought a few years ago, the bristles kept parting company with the brush and sticking behind on the wall.
 
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Jun 20, 2005
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Dulux Trade every time . Trade paint has a far greater opacity than standard, as pointed out by Woodentop. Coverage per coat is better. The answer is self explanatory. A professional painter doesn’t want any “ come backs”.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I forgot that we would probably need to apply two coats so Farrow & Ball will probably be crossed off our list as that will work out very expensive. I was looking for a tough long lasting paint that does not mark easily and marks can be removed fairly easily i.e. something falling and knocking on wall. We have brick outer and walls made from that stuff where you punch it hard enough, you wil make a hole, plasterboard? .
Thanks for the tips regarding brushes as the last lot of paint brushes we bought a few years ago, the bristles kept parting company with the brush and sticking behind on the wall.
For kitchen in this house and our last I’ve used Dulux Easycare Washable and Tough. Where the dogs come in and shake required regular wiping down. It did the job very well.
 
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Oct 8, 2006
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We had a kitchen extension built about 4 years ago and decided to paint the walls a light/mid grey so it matched the new fitted part in the 'old' kitchen. We used Crown Trade Durable Matt in a colour known as RAL7047. It was recommended by the branch manager and he mixed a small pot of it f.o.c. for us to try. He said he sells more of that colour in any paint once the customer has tried it. It goes on like a dream - two coats - cleans very easily, doesn't scratch or chip, and whether rolled on (preferred) or brushed you cannot see any directional effects of lines/marks. RAL numbers are the Crown equivalent of British Standards.

Worth checking?
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Snap. Just about to start on some of our walls.

Over the years we've tried different paints and can't say there was much difference accept for the Eco Paint we tried last time around. Expensive but had no smell at all when applying. Not too sure about the colour fastness though.

Cutting in always seems to take the time and I use a cutting in angled brush. I've tried low tack masking tape but that doesn't seem to work too well and even the low tack stuff can peel off some paint.

Main walls get the emulsion applied by roller and I tend to use Prodec products. You can get long handled rollers which are good for ceilings and outside walls.

For brushes its whatever we can get at a reasonble price.

Good luck.
Not sure what you mean by "cutting in"? We were looking at a low tack masking tape for the "dusk" sheets we were going to use to prevent paint dripping onto the carpet. Which low tack masking tape is best?

Also when painting when you get to the join where the wall meets the ceiling, what is the best method to avoid accidentally painting the ceiling as cannot use masking tape there. Same applies with skirting at the bottom.

Keep the hints rolling in as learning a lot. Thanks.
 
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Nov 11, 2009
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Not sure what you mean by "cutting in"? We were looking at a low tack masking tape for the "dusk" sheets we were going to use to prevent paint dripping onto the carpet. Which low tack masking tape is best?

Also when painting when you get to the join where the wall meets the ceiling, what is the best method to avoid accidentally painting the ceiling as cannot use masking tape there.

Keep the hints rolling in as learning a lot. Thanks.
Any low tack tape should do, I’ve had non branded rolls from Screwfix, Wickes etc and they all do the job. To prevent the wall colour from going onto the ceiling I just use a good quality 1 inch brush, but have also used one of the paint edge protectors/shield, although I’ve found you do have to wipe it down every couple of uses otherwise the emulsion can go under. Best to do the ceiling first and cut it down to an inch or two onto the walls before doing the walls. Then I would emulsion the wallls where they join the ceiling or skirtings/architraves using a good quality brush. Then you can emulsion with a rolller almost up to those areas and cover areas applied by brush but avoiding contact with the ceiling/ skirtings etc.

Suspect Parksy with his professional background will put me right if I’m not using best practice. Then I will heed his advice next week when I start on a bedroom 😁

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Silverline-349035-Paint-Splatter-Shield/dp/B003TNULIG/ref=pd_lpo_2?pd_rd_i=B003TNULIG&psc=1

http://thepaintedsurface.com/how-to-cut-in.php#:~:text=Cutting-in, sometimes called trimming in, is a process,or break the looks of a painting project.
 
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Sam Vimes

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Sep 7, 2020
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Not sure what you mean by "cutting in"? We were looking at a low tack masking tape for the "dusk" sheets we were going to use to prevent paint dripping onto the carpet. Which low tack masking tape is best?

Also when painting when you get to the join where the wall meets the ceiling, what is the best method to avoid accidentally painting the ceiling as cannot use masking tape there. Same applies with skirting at the bottom.

Keep the hints rolling in as learning a lot. Thanks.
To me one example of 'cutting in' is when you're painting a wall and need to go into a corner - wall or ceiling. Cutting in involves using a 'cutting in' brush which has an angled top instead of the usual straight edge. You then carefully paint a 3 cm or so wide strip into the corner, then you can finish the rest more quickly with a roller or wider brush.

I use low tack tape on the glass around window frames and its very good in preventing overspills. Also use it on hardwood floors when painting the skirting. No good on carpet or other fabrics. Also not good on rough walls as the paint can creep underneath.

I've also used it when applying sealant around fixtures and worktops.

Recently I tried the low tack tape on the ceiling when painting a wall a darker colour. It worked well in preventing overspill but when removed took some flakes of paint with it from the ceiling.

My next test - still using a cutting in brush - is a home made paint sheild, cut from the top of a margarine tub. Very thin and cut straight. It'll be a few days before I try this but I'll try and let you know how I get on with it.


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Jul 18, 2017
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Thanks. I will probably order most of the stuff from Screwfix. I think I need about 2.5-3litres for the small room according to various calculations which allow 10% for wastage.

Going to order the following if correct;

Harris Trade Fine-Tip Brush Set 5 Pieces (7354X)
Harris cutting in brush 2” (5146X)
Harris trade 9” roller sleeves
Harris trade 9” roller frame
Harris 9” paint tray
No Nonsense 9” tray inserts 5 pack
No Nonsense sugar soap powder
Eurocell masking tape

Hopefully the list above is about right. Can't find a slim roller for doing behind radiators as they only due mini 4" rollers. Also looking for protective covering for our woolen carpets.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Did search on Screwfix for Dulux trade paint and it comes up with quite a number of options including satin wood, but all seem to be in brilliant white. Maybe better to buy paint elsewhere?
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Thanks. I will probably order most of the stuff from Screwfix. I think I need about 2.5-3litres for the small room according to various calculations which allow 10% for wastage.

Going to order the following if correct;

Harris Trade Fine-Tip Brush Set 5 Pieces (7354X)
Harris cutting in brush 2” (5146X)
Harris trade 9” roller sleeves
Harris trade 9” roller frame
Harris 9” paint tray
No Nonsense 9” tray inserts 5 pack
No Nonsense sugar soap powder
Eurocell masking tape

Hopefully the list above is about right. Can't find a slim roller for doing behind radiators as they only due mini 4" rollers. Also looking for protective covering for our woolen carpets.
Harris do large protection sheeting that is plastic backed. Alternatively Screwfix do the self adhesive clear sheeting that you see used at caravan dealerships to protect carpets.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Did search on Screwfix for Dulux trade paint and it comes up with quite a number of options including satin wood, but all seem to be in brilliant white. Maybe better to buy paint elsewhere?
Screwfix and Toolstation paint ranges are limited. Go to a paint Center or a large DIY store for best range of colours.
 
Oct 8, 2006
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Ditto for Crown Trade Centres, but neither Dulux or Crown trade paint is cheap.

It's always a good idea if it falls within your purview to buy British Standard colours so that you can get the same a few years down the road for touch up. An example is Dulux Conker (very dark brown) which Dulux no longer do in the DIY colour range, but go to the mixing desk and as it is a BS colour it is on their system (although the colour is not shown on the multi-shade slips they give out) and they can mix it for you.

For protection of carpets when painting the skirting, get a couple of rolls of 2" masking tape. Run this along the edge of the carpet and lay a dust sheet on top of it. You can also get curved plastic strip which will push down between the carpet and the skirting allowing you to slop it on and not worry about any spatters. Then when it has had 24 hours to dry (oil paint, 12-16 hours for water based) just pull the plastics out, touch up where necessary against the masking tape, and when that is dry remove the tape.

Simples.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Seems that Screwfix don't want my business. Added everything to basket which took about 5 - 10 minutes and went to pay and it states that my basket is empty???? Done that 3 times so now suspect a glitch in their systems.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Seems that Screwfix don't want my business. Added everything to basket which took about 5 - 10 minutes and went to pay and it states that my basket is empty???? Done that 3 times so now suspect a glitch in their systems.
Strange as I’m a regular at Screwfix and never had a problem with the website. Most things that are in stock I order and then walk up to the store and collect.
 

Parksy

Moderator
Nov 12, 2009
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A paint roller pole might be a good addition to your list Buckman, especially if you're going to paint more than one room.
The extension pole either slots or screws into the roller frame.
The pole is ideal for painting ceilings and the top part of walls, it could save you having to go up and down step ladders for much of the time.
They are sold at various prices, a mid range pole with a good locking mechanism should do the job.
Cutting in, as described earlier is the art of painting a surface edge such as where a wall meets a ceiling without allowing paint to stray onto the adjoining surface.
Cutting in brushes can be useful, and the trick is to load enough paint onto your brush to create a defined edge, press your brush onto the surface so that the trailing bristles drag and draw your brush along to create your line.
If you've never done it, practice the technique away from the edge that you want to cut in first.
 

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