Tips on touring

Feb 23, 2018
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I've just booked a 2 week touring holiday of North England & Scotland which will see us staying at 5 caravan sites. This is actually the first time that I have properly 'toured' as all previous caravan holidays have been out and back affairs. Does anyone have any hints or tips for making the process (packing/prepping/hitching etc) easier or more efficient? We will be moving on every 3 days or so; we don't have an awning so this will save on time/marriage.

Thanks, Paul.
 
Dec 13, 2017
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Take some folding crates so you can easily move items between van and car. Heavy tins etc can really mess up your loading. We keep things like that in a crate in a cupboard so we can easily shift weight about. Also, time your toilet flush filling, water roller filling and any other on-board water servicing so you do not fill it up then a couple of hours later, waste all that water to drain it away again. Depending on how close you are to weights, decide if you want to drain and re-fill the hot water etc each time you move.

If you use a drill for the steadies etc, take the charger. If you wind a lot it may go flat!

Lastly, get a big holdall for cables etc so you do not waste ages getting things folded and coiled exactly back into the custom-fit, slightly too small thing you usually put them in. One big bag with your cables, wheel chocs, locks, steady drill etc chucked in the back of the car saves weight and faff if moving on every couple of days.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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Not much of a tip I admit, but use supermarkets (one at the outset of the journey) for 3 days supply, you don't need to carry enough for the entire trip. You will not run out or starve :lol: .

Stop in at convenient supermarkets along the journey for next 3 day supply, saves money, saves weight and if you are anything like us you won't be buying much because you took too much stuff in the first place :huh: .

Beer. wine and spirits are the exception of course (do not run out it will spoil your adventure :p )

Even in Scotland we have enough stores for top-ups to survive without calling the emergency services.

Fill your vehicle with fuel before setting out to your next destination, peace of mind if things go awry.

Have a great trip and a great holiday :) .
 
Feb 23, 2018
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Mark31415 said:
Take some folding crates so you can easily move items between van and car....

...If you use a drill for the steadies etc, take the charger. If you wind a lot it may go flat!..

Lastly, get a big holdall for cables etc so you do not waste ages getting things folded and coiled exactly back into the custom-fit, slightly too small thing you usually put them in. One big bag with your cables, wheel chocs, locks, steady drill etc chucked in the back of the car saves weight and faff if moving on every couple of days.

Thanks Mark... Some good tips. We have one folding crate which was used for washing-up in another camping outfit. I don't take my drill with me as it is too heavy being the older NiMH batteries not Lithium-ion, so would definitely need the charger. I think an Ikea bag in the boot would serve me well for dumping the EHU cable and other items during the connecting journeys.
 
Feb 23, 2018
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Anseo said:
Not much of a tip I admit, but use supermarkets (one at the outset of the journey) for 3 days supply, you don't need to carry enough for the entire trip. You will not run out or starve :lol: .

Stop in at convenient supermarkets along the journey for next 3 day supply, saves money, saves weight and if you are anything like us you won't be buying much because you took too much stuff in the first place :huh: .

Beer. wine and spirits are the exception of course (do not run out it will spoil your adventure :p )

Even in Scotland we have enough stores for top-ups to survive without calling the emergency services.

Fill your vehicle with fuel before setting out to your next destination, peace of mind if things go awry.

Have a great trip and a great holiday :) .

Thanks Sir Haggis, We always take food with good intentions, which are then spoiled by a trip to the supermarket! A few hundred miles added to the tins in the pantry :p .

I think running out of fuel is my biggest fear... especially when towing. I have plotted the journey on google maps with suitable fuel/comfort stops planned out as best I can but will brim the tank prior to departure.

Looking forward to the trip as one side of my family is from South Lanarkshire, but it's been 6 years since I last visited Scotland (Oban) and 15 years since my last tour (via B&Bs).
 
Sep 29, 2016
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CustardAvenger said:
Anseo said:
Not much of a tip I admit, but use supermarkets (one at the outset of the journey) for 3 days supply, you don't need to carry enough for the entire trip. You will not run out or starve :lol: .

Stop in at convenient supermarkets along the journey for next 3 day supply, saves money, saves weight and if you are anything like us you won't be buying much because you took too much stuff in the first place :huh: .

Beer. wine and spirits are the exception of course (do not run out it will spoil your adventure :p )

Even in Scotland we have enough stores for top-ups to survive without calling the emergency services.

Fill your vehicle with fuel before setting out to your next destination, peace of mind if things go awry.

Have a great trip and a great holiday :) .

Thanks Sir Haggis, We always take food with good intentions, which are then spoiled by a trip to the supermarket! A few hundred miles added to the tins in the pantry :p .

I think running out of fuel is my biggest fear... especially when towing. I have plotted the journey on google maps with suitable fuel/comfort stops planned out as best I can but will brim the tank prior to departure.

Looking forward to the trip as one side of my family is from South Lanarkshire, but it's been 6 years since I last visited Scotland (Oban) and 15 years since my last tour (via B&Bs).

Sounds very much like you have been carefully planning and looking forward to your trip.

I am wishing it will all go as planned and that you have a wonderful experience (it is possible in Scotland).

Have a great time :)
 
May 7, 2012
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If you are going in to the more emote areas of Scotland do remember that fuel stations can be few and far between. I would make sure that you keep the tank well topped up to be safe.
We do not use the folding crates but Tesco Big Green Bags and the like from other stores. They will hold roughly the same but being flexible fit into spaces better and if you want to unpack your clothes into the wardrobe or drawers and lockers take up next to no space when folded. IKEA bags sound right for this.
 
Feb 23, 2018
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Raywood said:
If you are going in to the more emote areas of Scotland do remember that fuel stations can be few and far between. I would make sure that you keep the tank well topped up to be safe.
We do not use the folding crates but Tesco Big Green Bags and the like from other stores. They will hold roughly the same but being flexible fit into spaces better and if you want to unpack your clothes into the wardrobe or drawers and lockers take up next to no space when folded. IKEA bags sound right for this.

Do you keep clothes on hanging rails when travelling? I've not had hanging space available before; kept clothes in an IKEA bag on hangars for travelling on our first trip in the new van, then onto the rail when pitched. Not sure if they would all just fall down along with the rail if they were hanging for the journey.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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CA, you can buy caravan specific hangers, or fit the type of hangers used in hotels, this sort of thing:
https://www.hangerworld.com/adult-clothes-hangers/anti-theft-hangers/black-plastic-hotel-security-hanger-44cm.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkYLAkLLa2wIVDhQbCh2Fpg6-EAQYAiABEgIWevD_BwE

I put a length of foam pipe insulation on the hanger rail and this makes a snug fit for most ordinary hangers, never had any hangers drop off yet.
 
Feb 23, 2018
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Anseo said:
CA, you can buy caravan specific hangers, or fit the type of hangers used in hotels, this sort of thing:
https://www.hangerworld.com/adult-clothes-hangers/anti-theft-hangers/black-plastic-hotel-security-hanger-44cm.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkYLAkLLa2wIVDhQbCh2Fpg6-EAQYAiABEgIWevD_BwE

I put a length of foam pipe insulation on the hanger rail and this makes a snug fit for most ordinary hangers, never had any hangers drop off yet.

Thanks... hadn't thought of pipe insulation. I'd seen that convoluted pipe stuff which some caravans/motorhomes have included.

The hanging rails in my Sprite are domestic wardrobe style oval bars and are hung on the open top brackets. I have taken them down for towing as I thought they would fall out. May need a way of securing the bar.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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CustardAvenger said:
Anseo said:
CA, you can buy caravan specific hangers, or fit the type of hangers used in hotels, this sort of thing:
https://www.hangerworld.com/adult-clothes-hangers/anti-theft-hangers/black-plastic-hotel-security-hanger-44cm.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkYLAkLLa2wIVDhQbCh2Fpg6-EAQYAiABEgIWevD_BwE

I put a length of foam pipe insulation on the hanger rail and this makes a snug fit for most ordinary hangers, never had any hangers drop off yet.

Thanks... hadn't thought of pipe insulation. I'd seen that convoluted pipe stuff which some caravans/motorhomes have included.

The hanging rails in my Sprite are domestic wardrobe style oval bars and are hung on the open top brackets. I have taken them down for towing as I thought they would fall out. May need a way of securing the bar.

I looked at the custom made caravan hangars but they came in too large a pack and seemed heavy. So having due regard for payload conservation I use the foam pipe insulation which works a treat.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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Custard Avenger,

Try the pipe foam insulation and with a few items on the hanger rail I think you will find the rail and clothes will stay in place.

If it ain't broke - don't fix it ;) .
 
Nov 16, 2015
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CA, we had some left over curtain rail Loops, the cloths hanger fit into the small holes. these work well. Always carry Cloths in the wardobe and in the lockers, just warry about loading .
 
Feb 23, 2018
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Thanks to everyone who has responded. I welcome any more useful tips!

The suggestions made have really helped. Being able to pack once where possible will save time and stress when trying to vacate a pitch (especially with 2 weeks worth of clothing). Keeping the 'set-up' items in the car between locations and using crates to transfer heavy tins etc to the car will also speed things up.

I don't think there is any way to speed up the pre-tow checks and other due diligence during hitching, but I think if I get the initial packing right, we will keep the faff to a minimum.

Thanks, Paul.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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If your wardrobe bars fit into open brackets you may be able to stop them jumping out by either putting a small screw with a few washers or a plastics crew cover on it into the wall immediately above the rail, or put a cable tie round the bracket with the rail in place and pull the cable tie up really tight. Then try the pipe insulation on the rail itself, again you can secure with cable ties.
Another trick is to cable tie a rod of appropriate length to the main rail after hanging the clothes in place. ( or use velcro tapes)This will discourage the hangers from jumping off. Fasten clothes to hangers by doing up neck buttons or putting the hanger dead through the label etc.
Finally a full rail is better than a half empty one.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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Hi Paul, I am on a pitch just now, just checked and my hanger rail is just like yours it seems, I am only using the pipe wrap and nothing else to secure the rail and all working just fine.
 
May 27, 2014
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Maybe obvious however fuel up at the supermarket - fuel in rural Scotland is damn expensive - remember to remove the breakaway cable when unhitching the caravan
 
Feb 23, 2018
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Anseo said:
Hi Paul, I am on a pitch just now, just checked and my hanger rail is just like yours it seems, I am only using the pipe wrap and nothing else to secure the rail and all working just fine.

I have a load of left over pipe insulation in the garage. Will try a hangar to see if it fits!

RayS said:
If your wardrobe bars fit into open brackets you may be able to stop them jumping out by either putting a small screw with a few washers or a plastics crew cover on it into the wall immediately above the rail, or put a cable tie round the bracket with the rail in place and pull the cable tie up really tight. Then try the pipe insulation on the rail itself, again you can secure with cable ties....

I had already though of cable ties (new van so loathe to make holes!) but will combine the advice and cable tie the Pipe insulation onto the bar for a belt and braces approach!

Thanks Paul.
 
Nov 16, 2015
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EH52ARH said:
CA, we had some left over curtain rail Loops, the cloths hanger fit into the small holes. these work well. Always carry Cloths in the wardobe and in the lockers, just warry about loading .

20180617_222451.jpg
 
Nov 16, 2015
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CustardAvenger said:
EH52ARH said:
Handcuffed to the BBQ, thats a wooden spoon for stirring the porridge.

Actually have a boatload of those curtains rings from Dunelm curtain poles. Sadly most of my hangers aren't suitable.

We have so many we could use them as Ballast in a sail boat, then the boss will want different curtains, in the house.
 

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