12v tyre pump for caravan

Mar 14, 2005
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My 20 year old 12v tyre pump expired recently and I’m looking for recommendations for a new one please.
Needs to be able to inflate to at least 65psi /4.5bar in reasonable time on standard caravan tyre which some units meant for cars just won’t cope with
 
Nov 11, 2009
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It was good for a SUV with 33 inch tyres and I’ve used it for other tow cars too. Useful if the cars tyre pressures change between loaded/ towing and solo. So you need to reduce on arrival and inflate prior to leaving. As a fall back I used a cycle pump the vertical high pressure type trackside floor pump that goes to 120 psi. Useful for adjusting van tyres when the car cannot get close.

PS edit. sorry I omitted to say that it was a Sealey compressor that I used bought for an off road SUV where you could be adjusted tyres during the day dependant on terrain, so not the most practical for day to day use.
 
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JTQ

May 7, 2005
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I like Clive use a cycle track pump which I carry for our bikes, to top up both the car at its 45 psi and caravan at 65 psi; it easily achieves this for the small loss corrections that occur away from home. Mine is the earlier version of "THIS" quality model.

For home use I have a 12 Volt DC pump, but a high performance one that draws far too much current [30Amps] for use from cigarette lighter type sockets, so needs access onto the battery.
RING RAC 900
 
Feb 23, 2018
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I've owned the Ring RAC635 tyre inflator for a few years: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00OP0WZGI/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_

Has been great, and copes with the 60-odd PSI caravan and car spare pressures with no issue. (it did blow the fuse for the caravan 12v sockets! Rookie mistake I suppose) I use it quite frequently to top off the car and caravan tyres as needed rather than spending £1 a time at the local garage.

My only gripe is that it screws onto the Schrader valve rather than being a clamp-on lever style; this means air is escaping as you fumble to quickly unscrew.
 
May 7, 2012
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I managed to get a Black and Decker model from Lidl before the lockdown. Not as versatile as I had hoped as it can only be charged from the cars cigarette lighter but looks robust and well made.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Thanks everyone, just what I wanted to know. particularly good to know a bike pump will be ok for top ups and save all the hassle of getting car near enough to use electric compressor for just the odd few psi’s
 
Nov 11, 2009
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The bike track pumps are very good and better even than a foot pump if you are on uneven or soft ground.
 
Mar 24, 2014
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When my Michelin inflator died (after struggling to inflate my caravan tryres) I decided to go for something heavier duty. I chose the Ring RAC 900, which I have seen used by roadside recovery units. I also managed to find it as a Flash Deal on a certain online retailer which knocked 20% off the price, which took the edge off the price. Very happy with it so far.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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The bike track pumps are very good and better even than a foot pump if you are on uneven or soft ground.
Yes, and track pumps are designed to achieve the very high pressures [160 ish] some cycles require, whereas the automotive foot pumps are designed for cars, where typically sub 40 psi is required.
The foot pump shifts more volume of air, but will become a hard push down by the time it reaches 65 psi, more than I could entertain doing, whereas with the track pump it is way below its rating at 65 psi.
 
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Feb 23, 2018
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...The foot pump shifts more volume of air, but will become a hard push down by the time it reaches 65 psi, more than I could entertain doing, whereas with the track pump it is way below its rating at 65 psi.
I gave up with [car] foot pumps as the last 2 I had before getting the RAC635, both went in the bin because the hoses split. The gauges on them also never worked and they were unstable, often rolling over. Plus they were awkward to store in the car, unlike the inflator

...I chose the Ring RAC 900, which I have seen used by roadside recovery units...
Wow... looks like a proper air-compressor. Is it not a bit unwieldy?
 
Mar 24, 2014
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I gave up with [car] foot pumps as the last 2 I had before getting the RAC635, both went in the bin because the hoses split. The gauges on them also never worked and they were unstable, often rolling over. Plus they were awkward to store in the car, unlike the inflator



Wow... looks like a proper air-compressor. Is it not a bit unwieldy?
It's not too bad. You need to connect it directly to the battery, but the curly hose is long enough to reach where you need to get. The built in pressure meter is a bit hit and miss, but I am usually using a separate one any way. The good thing is that it is fast, and doesn't show any strain even when doing the caravan tyres.
 
Sep 26, 2018
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I bought an AirHawk digital, which is both rechargeable and powered from 12V. It looks a bit like an electric drill. Pumps up to 110psi and is much better to use on the motorbike than the bigger jobs. Can thoroughly recommend. The digital gauge works as well as my calibrated gauge does
 
Mar 14, 2005
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I;ve bought the Ring pump and while it works fine and the connectionion is much easier that the lever type, the display is nothing like as clear as it appears in the ads or video reviews and is almost unreadable on a bright sunny day. Also, the same button is used to select psi/ bar etc as to set inflation pressure, You are supposed to hold it for about two seconds when setting the latter but it is very easy to change the former while doing so, and hence the set pressure may not be what you want, and is only shown in the top line of the diplay which is small and indistinct.
So suggest you do not rely on this and always check with another gauge after inflation. Great idea but like so many things obviously not tested in real life situations.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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My only gripe is that it screws onto the Schrader valve rather than being a clamp-on lever style; this means air is escaping as you fumble to quickly unscrew.
There's a knack to minimise the air loss when releasing this type of coupling:

Whilst the collar is fully screwed on, grab the hose close to the collar and push it axially towards the valve to keep it engaged whilst you unscrew the collar. Keep the pushing .

Whilst you begin to unscrew the collar. At first the collar will be stiff becasue it was tight on the valve, but it should then become easier as it loosens.

As the collar moves up the valve thread it will eventually begin to interfere with the end of pumps hose, at which point, pull the hose gently and continue to unscrew the collar until it's disengaged.

There may be a small puff of air as you change from pushing to pulling but it will very small and shouldn't cause a measurable pressure drop.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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I;ve bought the Ring pump
Which of the various RING pumps?
The RAC 900's gauge is IMO very clearly read.

There may be a small puff of air as you change from pushing to pulling but it will very small and shouldn't cause a measurable pressure drop.
There, is of course going to be all the compressed air held within the hose that vents, so there will be that puff. The puff you get does not mean it is necessarily any air from the tyre escaping.
I agree that using your technique helps minimise that, in my case I suspect doing so is somewhat second nature.
The hose venting off occurs with both the screwed connectors and clip-ons.
 
Jan 3, 2012
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Ring RAC610 12V pumps up to 300psi from (Euro Car Parks )
it pumps up Football & Bicycles or even larger vehicles
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I don’t trust any of my inbuilt gauges from electric, track or barrel foot pumps. So I just inflate to slight over pressure and then check with gauge. Of which I have electronic Ring, TireTek mechanical and PCL pen gauge. OCD or what ?
 

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