Carlight casetta

Oct 3, 2018
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Hi all.
We have just recently brought a 1979 Carlight casetta and going through a few things and was wondering what something is by the side of the heater, thin metal thing with dial on top, any idea as we don't collect the caravan until next week.
Can anyone advise on what its is.
Thanks - picture borrowed from other site - similar to what is shown

 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hello andysworkshop

The item you have circled is a thermostat used to control the space heater. The model of heater is an SB1800 which had no thermostatic control, but the TH33 could be added to provide automatic control of temperature.

Its fully in keeping with the upmarket features of a Carlight.
 
May 7, 2012
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I think the prof is probably correct but if you want help and a definite confirmation I would try the Carlight owners Club who you might like to join as you have something special there.
http://www.carlightownersclub.co.uk/
 
Mar 14, 2005
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The SB1800 Is a room sealed gas heater. It has both it's air intake and exhaust under the floor of the caravan, it is a highly efficient heater, and when using it it is common to see water vapour wafting about under the floor. Some people mistakenly thought it was smoke. The heater has a manually adjusted gas regulating valve, but it is not thermostatic. Once set the heater will continue to produce the same amount of heat until it's adjusted or the gas runs out.

Truma produced a thermostatic regulator valve ( the TH33) which can be plumbed into the gas feed pipe to the heater. This would restrict the gas supply to the heater as the temperature of the wax filled phail warmed up. Crucially it did not completely stop the gas, so the heater would remain alight, but running at a reduced rate. If the temperature fell the TH33 would reduce the restriction on the gas allowing the heater to increase its heat output.

The set point of the TH33 could be adusted to suit the users prefered temperature regime.

I fitted several of these to customers caravans in the early 80s.

A word of caution. It is vitally important have the gas feed and burner feed pipes of the heater inspected annually, as legislation concerning the construction of the heater meant both these pipes could not be made of copper and had to be made of steel, and over time they will rust, even those with an epoxy coating. I believe replacement pipes are still available.

Another important point, is because the flue is below the caravan floor, the under caravan space must always have at least three open sides, and caution must be used if there heavy or drifting snow that might block it. That is one reason why the later and more Powerful models of the heaters had roof flues.

If the heaters flame goes out, a flame failure device will stop the gas flow, and it will need to be manually restarted.
 
Oct 3, 2018
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Thank you for the info.
Another question. we have not had a caravan before, how does all the lighting work without hook up and what do we need to work water pump and lights.
Thank you
 
Mar 14, 2005
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andysworkshop said:
Thank you for the info.
Another question. we have not had a caravan before, how does all the lighting work without hook up and what do we need to work water pump and lights.
Thank you

By 1979 most caravans will have a mixture of 12V dc and mains lighting. A few die hard models may have some gas lighting, but obtaining spare mantles may prove quite difficult these days. The mains lights will only work when you have hook up. The 12V dc lighting will need a battery, and there should be a proper ventilated stowage space for one in the caravan. The battery would be expected to be charged from the tow vehicle and the towing plugs should be wired for it. It worth mentioning the the fridge, which will also likely to be be three way powered, use mains when on Hook up, Gas when off grid, and 12V when being towed. However do double check the tow plug wiring in both plugs and sockets for battery and fridge operation as standards have changed. You can find lots of information about the latest wiring standards on line.

By 1979, there were quite a few 12V fluorescent lights being fitted, but by now teh fittings will have aged quite a lot. It would be worth looking to replace them with modern LED units, which will be far more efficient, and reliable.

Caravans with EHU (Hook up) will normally have a built in battery charger, but in 1979, most of the chargers were still very basic unregulated models. These must have a battery fitted to help smooth the chargers output, and to carry the peak loads when some items are used. There is also a danger from some unregulated models of charger they can overcharge a battery. I suggest you check the model you have fitted, and if its an unregulated output model, it may be worth considering replacing it with a more modern unit with multistage charging to prolong the life of the battery.

Water pumps - in 1979 even some upmarket vans (e.g. Castleton) had foot operated pumps! It's therefore difficult to know what you might have fitted in your caravan. Being a Carlight I anticipate it might have an electric water pump. there are the variations of Inboard or outboard, control system, of switched taps where every tap has its own micro switch which are linked in parallel to power the pump, or a pressure switched control system, and the type of pump either impeller, which tend to be exterior submersible pumps or positive displacement which are in board pumps, but becasue they reciprocate they can be relatively noisy, especially if they are mounted on a large wooden pane that can amplify the sound.

Water tanks, Up market models of caravan often used an inboard water tank as a selling point, so yours might have one.

P.S.
Don't be afraid to ask questions, and don't be shy about using the blue "Thank you" tab at the bottom of each answer
 

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