Mains Water

Jun 23, 2005
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I have been reading the posts about connecting main water but this may seem like a silly question but how do you connect the hose to the tap? We're away next week and have a fully serviced pitch so would like to connect the aquaroll to the mains
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Depends where you are. In Europe many taps have a male thread on the spout onto which you screw an adapter which has the standard garden hose type connector on the other end.

If the tap has a smooth spout, you use the type which is a rubber cone with an external hose (Jubilee type) clip and then converts to hose - just like you use for converting domestic taps for watering the garden.

Both types are available in Garden Centres, DIYs or in France - bricolage. They are so cheap that we carry a small bag of likely sizes and haven't been beaten yet.

Beware that some continental sites can sometimes have very high water pressure which can split hoses and/ or blow off the joints.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hello Ian,

Pleas forgive me if I'm covering details you already know. Ray has already pointed out that the water pressure in site taps is very variable, but you must assume that it will exceed the 1.5Bar that caravans are generally designed for.

As such it is essential that you have a pressure reducing/limiting valve between the pitch tap and the caravan.

There is am important difference between a pressure reducer and a flow restricter. A flow restricter simply narrows reduces the size of the pipe which limits the amount of water that can pass. When all the taps in the caravan are turned off, there will be zero flow, but as the restriction is still open the full pressure of the mains supply will be applied to the caravan. as this can easily exceed 6 Bar in the UK, it will almost certainly find the weak spots in a caravan and either blow a joint or at least leak.

A pressure reducer is an active device which changes the size of the restriction according to demand and which effectively limits the maximum pressure down stream of the device. At zero flow, the device completely seals the pipe and prevents excess pressure from reaching the caravan.

All proprietary direct mains connection kits will incorporate a pressure reducer.

One of the criticisms levelled at some of thees direct mains connections is that the maximum flow of water is sometimes less than the submersible pump.

An alternative and very effective solution is to fit a Torbeck valve (float valve) into a water barrel (Aquarol or similar). This is then connected to the site supply and keeps your water container full. You use your normal water pump to lift the water into the caravan. This entirely protects your caravan if the direct mains feed does reach a very high pressure, or if the site pressure drops very low.

Which ever system you choose, you should ensure the hose pipe you use is approved for use on a potable supply (i.e. drinking water). Many ordinary garden hoses are not manufactured for drinking water and may leech out undesirable chemicals in to the water. Avoid Yellow hoses and fittings, as these usually contain the very poisonous Cadmium.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Yellow hoses ........... cadmium!!! I was told that yellow garden hoses were no different from green drinking hoses as they are both lined with a pvc sheet and that green hoses were just a money making con. Which is correct?
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Dear Captain,

It is difficult to know if your question here is genuine or not because of your numerous frivolous postings else where. I will give you the befit of the doubt on this occasion.

I cannot tell you if it is a money making scam or not, but it is a fact that the yellow colouring in many plastic fittings is derived from cadmium. Regardless of the colour of the hose you should only use those that are rated by the Water Research Council (WRC) as being suitable for potable water.

Assume that if it does not carry a WRC approval it should not be used for drinking water.
 
Jun 9, 2005
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Hello Ian,

Pleas forgive me if I'm covering details you already know. Ray has already pointed out that the water pressure in site taps is very variable, but you must assume that it will exceed the 1.5Bar that caravans are generally designed for.

As such it is essential that you have a pressure reducing/limiting valve between the pitch tap and the caravan.

There is am important difference between a pressure reducer and a flow restricter. A flow restricter simply narrows reduces the size of the pipe which limits the amount of water that can pass. When all the taps in the caravan are turned off, there will be zero flow, but as the restriction is still open the full pressure of the mains supply will be applied to the caravan. as this can easily exceed 6 Bar in the UK, it will almost certainly find the weak spots in a caravan and either blow a joint or at least leak.

A pressure reducer is an active device which changes the size of the restriction according to demand and which effectively limits the maximum pressure down stream of the device. At zero flow, the device completely seals the pipe and prevents excess pressure from reaching the caravan.

All proprietary direct mains connection kits will incorporate a pressure reducer.

One of the criticisms levelled at some of thees direct mains connections is that the maximum flow of water is sometimes less than the submersible pump.

An alternative and very effective solution is to fit a Torbeck valve (float valve) into a water barrel (Aquarol or similar). This is then connected to the site supply and keeps your water container full. You use your normal water pump to lift the water into the caravan. This entirely protects your caravan if the direct mains feed does reach a very high pressure, or if the site pressure drops very low.

Which ever system you choose, you should ensure the hose pipe you use is approved for use on a potable supply (i.e. drinking water). Many ordinary garden hoses are not manufactured for drinking water and may leech out undesirable chemicals in to the water. Avoid Yellow hoses and fittings, as these usually contain the very poisonous Cadmium.
Thanks! I didn't know they were called Torbeck-got one from B&Q for about
 
Mar 21, 2006
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Dear Captain,

It is difficult to know if your question here is genuine or not because of your numerous frivolous postings else where. I will give you the befit of the doubt on this occasion.

I cannot tell you if it is a money making scam or not, but it is a fact that the yellow colouring in many plastic fittings is derived from cadmium. Regardless of the colour of the hose you should only use those that are rated by the Water Research Council (WRC) as being suitable for potable water.

Assume that if it does not carry a WRC approval it should not be used for drinking water.
Hi Do people drink water supplied to the caravan through the hose and aqau roll? we would never drink this water we use it for tea/coffee but would hold a small container in fridge or use bottle. As in my opinion to drink directly from the caravan tap you would need to clean the water system every trip.
 

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