One for the photographers on here

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Jun 16, 2020
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Let me know if anyone wants to see my classic photos of….
The floor
My right foot
My thumb
Random photos out of focus of the sky
Some stunning photos that should have squirrels or birds in them but don’t


Steve
I can recommend a free app called “Get Sorted”. Which makes getting rid of the junk a bit easier.

John
 
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I can recommend a free app called “Get Sorted”. Which makes getting rid of the junk a bit easier.

John
Why not just use the phones Select option in its Photos app. Select all those you don’t want and then delete. On iPhones they remain in Recently Deleted 30 days just in case you want to recover that shot if your knee. 😂
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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Way back in the early days of microprocessor design a study showed that only 20% of instructions got used 80% of the time. This lead to the development of RISC microprocessors.

So your 20% coverage of the manual is about right. But you have to hope it's the right 20% 😉

In fact you can apply the 80/20 rule to many things in life.

Arguably manuals are not intended to be "read", 100%, in any sense like a novel, IMO they are a reference tool.

One of the most tedious facets of my life was been involved in technically editing and approving the things. Simply reading them has to be easy, compared to trying to see if you can "mis read" them.

In more recent times it became a bit of a family joke, with comments on me reading them particularly deeply, maybe some hidden sympathy for those involved in the production?
 
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Nov 11, 2009
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Arguably manuals are not intended to be "read", 100%, in any sense like a novel, IMO they are a reference tool.

One of the most tedious facets of my life was been involved in technically editing and approving the things. Simply reading them has to be easy, compared to trying to see if you can "mis read" them.

In more recent times it became a bit of a family joke, with comments on me reading them particularly deeply, maybe some hidden sympathy for those involved in the production?
The manuals for my two LUMIX cameras are enormous. I don’t use the cameras across their range of capabilities but if I had to carry them with me I would be paying excess baggage charges. So I have them downloaded onto my IPad for reading. Although to be honest the nett effect is mostly to put me to sleep. 😴
 

JTQ

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Many will be accessible online, Panasonic being good in this regard.
I have PDF digitised or downloaded most of the manuals for everything we have, kept with scan of the purchase receipt, on my home Network Attached Storage [My Cloud]. So these are readily available where I can get a data internet connection. Digitised makes searching an easier task, and PDF editing can strip out to just the English version, printing in multi languages in itself a mega bulking of the hardcopy version..

Though simply asking Google if some issue needs explaining, usually has a selection of answers, often directly focused on the same point that you are needing to understand.
 
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Many will be accessible online, Panasonic being good in this regard.
I have PDF digitised or downloaded most of the manuals for everything we have, kept with scan of the purchase receipt, on my home Network Attached Storage [My Cloud]. So these are readily available where I can get a data internet connection. Digitised makes searching an easier task, and PDF editing can strip out to just the English version, printing in multi languages in itself a mega bulking of the hardcopy version..

Though simply asking Google if some issue needs explaining, usually has a selection of answers, often directly focused on the same point that you are needing to understand.
Ditto but on ICloud.
 

Sam Vimes

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Wonky horizons and verticals are quite common and most post processing software will have easy tools to correct this. As for grid markings on the camera, these tend to be visible on the rear LCD screens which is not something I use very often as I much prefer an optical viewfinder.

My Canon dSRL has a built in 'spirit level' which can be displayed on the rear screen. Not only will it indicate if the camera is level but also indicates the pitch i.e lens pointing down or up. I only ever use this if the camera is on my tripod.

Exposure of some scenes can be tricky with digital just as it was with film. In built exposure 'meters' do a fairly good job. Some scenes however can have a wide tonal range which the metering sort of averages out and often the shadows might be too dark or the highlights too light. As Woodentop refered to - landscapes can have bright skies and dark forgrounds, so how do you get the best exposure.

Years ago when working with film I would Dodge and Burn a print being exposed in the enlarger. In other words blocking off areas that didn't need as much exposure while allowing the rest to have more. In the digital world most post processing software has similar techniques but its always better to get the best you can when actually taking the shot. If the detail in highlights is burnt out you'll never get it back.

I used to use Graduated Filters. A piece of glass/plastic that is opaque but in varying degrees along its length. Imagine smoked glass which is dense at one end and clear at the other. This fitted onto a holder on the front of the camera and you could position it accordingly so that skies for instance would have the denser area and the foreground the clearer.

Its a lot of faffing about but it worked really well but not much use when faced with a charging Rhino. :)

The digital world software also has the same feature which allows you to recreated graduated exposure across an image. Not only that it can adjust colour, contrast, saturation, sharpness and so on. It works well with RAW images but can be limited with Jpegs.

As Woodentop also refered to you can also use a technique crudely described as 'expose and recompose'. This is where you point the camera at a specific area you want the exposure to be calculated from and then fix this in the camera. Either with an Exposure Lock button or by half pressing the shutter - then moving the camera back to frame the image how you want it.

Half pressing the shutter button is easy but you have to remember it also locks in the focus, which using the AE Lock button doesn't.

Of course the big thing that gets refered to especially with Smartphones is HDR which is where the camera attempts to capture a wider tonal range by taking multiple shots at different exposures and blending them together. I've tried this with my dSLR but never been happy with the results.
 

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