Painting newly plastered walls

Jul 30, 2007
864
75
18,935
Hi.
Just had our (previously artexed)hallway,landing and stairs plastered.(its now dry after 2 weeks)

For the first coat,im going to use some watered down white emulsion.

I would imagine it may need a second coat and was wondering if I could mix a small amount of the top coat with this coat to help the final coat(the end result) to this 2nd coat to help it to cover the white.

Not sure if I've worded this correctly,but hope you understand.
1st.coat....watered down white
2nd.coat....white with a hint of the final coat included
3rd.coat....The final coat.
 
Nov 11, 2009
8,969
1,118
30,935
Hi.
Just had our (previously artexed)hallway,landing and stairs plastered.(its now dry after 2 weeks)

For the first coat,im going to use some watered down white emulsion.

I would imagine it may need a second coat and was wondering if I could mix a small amount of the top coat with this coat to help the final coat(the end result) to this 2nd coat to help it to cover the white.

Not sure if I've worded this correctly,but hope you understand.
1st.coat....watered down white
2nd.coat....white with a hint of the final coat included
3rd.coat....The final coat.

That will be absolutely fine. I ve got 10 litres of Valspar in the downstairs cloaks waiting to be applied. My wife thinks that the lounge should be smartened up for Christmas. :( Might give its go after we return from Norfolk but not with any great enthusiasm I must admit. My kids and grandkids pay decorators to do such jobs, cannot imagine why?
 
Jul 30, 2007
864
75
18,935
Many thanks otherclive.👍

I'm hoping that the 3rd coat will be the final one and not have to do a 4th to cover the plain white.

Going to do 1st.coat tomorrow then continue each afternoon when I get home from work.

I'm not really a diy person,and would prefer to pay a professional to come and do it but moneys a bit tight at the moment😔
Thanks again
 
Jun 16, 2020
531
172
435
What you have described is how it is done traditionally and will be fine. The watered down coat really gets into the plaster and forms a bond. otherwise the paint can lie on the surface and even shed.

You may want to look at the newish breed of paints. But here is Valspar's suggested way. Just like what you have suggested.

John
 
Jul 30, 2007
864
75
18,935
I'm just wondering if I could do 1 watered down undercoat,then 2 top coats.
Maybe newly plastered walls need 2 undercoats......I'm not sure🤔
Just missed your post Jcloughie.
Thank you.
 
Jan 3, 2012
2,682
383
20,935
We also have a decorator who did our bungalow out four years from top to bottom including the doors he had it done a lot quicker then i could do it ,
 
Nov 11, 2009
8,969
1,118
30,935
I'm just wondering if I could do 1 watered down undercoat,then 2 top coats.
Maybe newly plastered walls need 2 undercoats......I'm not sure🤔
Just missed your post Jcloughie.
Thank you.
I would make the second coat a bit more than a hint of final colour as I often find that eve with what I think is a modest colour change I finish up having to put three coats of full colour on. But I must say after using Valspar 500 and 700 the coverage is very good. I guess that you get what you pay for.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GeorgeandAde

Parksy

Moderator
Nov 12, 2009
10,639
606
40,935
The 50 / 50 diluted first coat is called the mist coat and the new plaster will absorb a lot of it.
The mist coat will seal the plaster and two rollered on top coats after the mist coat should be sufficient.
 
Jul 30, 2007
864
75
18,935
Will have to tell the wife to go careful with the first watered down coat because of the mess😂😂
 

Parksy

Moderator
Nov 12, 2009
10,639
606
40,935
Will have to tell the wife to go careful with the first watered down coat because of the mess😂😂
Don't load the roller with too much paint, roll off the excess into the paint tray and cut in to the edges with a good quality brush.
Matt emulsion will cover without showing an edge from the brushed surface.
You need to keep a wet edge at all times if using silk emulsion paint, so brush cut in for a couple of metres and roller the wall while the edge is still wet.
Top Tip:
Buy top quality paint brushes and use them to cut in for the emulsion before washing thoroughly.
This will get rid of any loose bristles.
You can then use your brush to apply undercoat and gloss without annoying loose bristles spoiling the finish.
The emulsion and gloss need to be either light or dark colours for each brush, you can't mix them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GeorgeandAde
Apr 20, 2009
4,818
101
20,735
I would make the second coat a bit more than a hint of final colour as I often find that eve with what I think is a modest colour change I finish up having to put three coats of full colour on. But I must say after using Valspar 500 and 700 the coverage is very good. I guess that you get what you pay for.
I didnt get what I paid for!!
The well known DIY store that sells it told me I would only need one coat
(told them I was changing from a lighter colour to something a bit darker)
Took TWO coats and really could have done with a third!! And at there prices they were not getting my money for a third lot. (Mrs didnt notice!)
Gone back to Dulux,. far superior in my opinion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Parksy
Oct 8, 2006
959
101
18,935
I would toddle along to your local DIY shed - the one that used to be Aussie owned is a good start - and get some microfibre rollers, either green or blue (mottled.) They put the paint on much better than most other rollers and spray almost nothing. The only thing I have found better is Mohair but they are much more expensive and very difficult to clean, whereas microfibre, well you just chuck it when finished. You can however keep them from going dry by wrapping them in clingfilm overnight.
If you-know-who doesn't have any in stock then redirect yourself to a branch of the paint manufacturer trade outlet - name related to a large tiara? - and get them there. They also do a plastic roller tray (yes I know you have one) but they sell packs of five thin but rigid plastic inserts for them - something like £3.50. When finished you just throw the insert away. Saves an awful lot of time cleaning up!
 

Parksy

Moderator
Nov 12, 2009
10,639
606
40,935
Homebase and Crown Decorating Centres?
You're allowed to name retail outlets as long as it's not in connection with complaints.
Screwfix is also good for things like disposable roller sleeves.
 
Oct 21, 2020
57
26
85
Crown centres are great value, ask them for a friends and family discount card, the paint you buy there is proper stuff and is far superior to the large tubs / cheap price offered in some well known places.
For new plaster, the mist coat should ideally be a 50/50 mix of non vinyl emulsion. Let it dry properly and you are sorted.
The risk you have if not using a mist coat is the paint coming off in sheets during future redecs, it’s one of the most common issues I come across in my role as a Construction Director when new home owners decide to paint their Interiours as soon as they move in (general consensus is to avoid vinyl based emulsions until after 6 months or so).

Kev
 
  • Like
Reactions: Parksy
Jun 20, 2005
11,631
425
40,935
I’ve always used Dulux Trade paints obtainable from Dulux colour centres. Their trade paints have a much higher specification than standard . The opacity for example is at least twice normal. Ask a professional decorator. They always use Trade paint. No come backs and better long term coverage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: otherclive
Jan 3, 2012
2,682
383
20,935
i would agree with Dusty brought Dulux paint for walls, ceiling and doors it seems to go further in my opinion .
 
Jul 30, 2007
864
75
18,935
Well......thats the first coat done🤗

Paint everywhere....lol

In a couple of days,I'm going to do the ceilings before the first main coat goes on the walls.

Exciting stuff isn't it......not🥴
 
Jun 16, 2020
531
172
435
Exciting .. not, I agree, since March I have done the whole house.

All ceilings, all walls including some papered. Wardrobes fitted in one room.

Now knackered, but still the hall floor to finish.

Good luck


John
 
  • Like
Reactions: GeorgeandAde

Parksy

Moderator
Nov 12, 2009
10,639
606
40,935
I’ve always used Dulux Trade paints obtainable from Dulux colour centres. Their trade paints have a much higher specification than standard . The opacity for example is at least twice normal. Ask a professional decorator. They always use Trade paint. No come backs and better long term coverage.
After a heart attack put the brakes on my suitability to drive articulated lorries I started a small decorating business with a partner.
We became Dulux Approved decorators, getting recommendations from Dulux to potential customers.
We always used Dulux Trade emulsion and other Dulux trade paints where appropriate and the emulsion invariably covered in two coats (plus the aforementioned mist coat on new plaster).
Crown paint gives a nice solid coloured finish but the paint didn't go as far as Dulux paint and it required more effort to apply than Dulux, which mattered when coating up three or for rooms a day on retirement flat and sheltered housing refurbs.
 
Jul 30, 2007
864
75
18,935
Yes I'm using dulux as well.

I gave up the lorry driving as well about 4 years ago due to persistent pain in my left knee(which led to a full replacement last year).

I do miss being out on the open road but don't miss the standards of driving and traffic build ups at peak times.

Well.....still got ceilings and approx.2 topcoats on the walls to do......ive got spare rollers etc.. if your at a loose end
Parksy😂😂
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Parksy
Jun 16, 2020
531
172
435
Trade paints v contract paints.

Might be wrong, but I think that Trade paints are the top end as described in earlier posts. But I think that contract paints are named to con people into thinking they are buying what the trade uses. But in reality it’s cheap stuff they are selling off.

I could very well be wrong, just seeing if anyone else thinks the same.


John
 

Parksy

Moderator
Nov 12, 2009
10,639
606
40,935
Trade paint has more pigment, contract paint usually means a large amount of d-I-y paint in a plastic tub at the cheaper end of the spectrum. It's not particularly durable.
 
Jun 16, 2020
531
172
435
Trade paint has more pigment, contract paint usually means a large amount of d-I-y paint in a plastic tub at the cheaper end of the spectrum. It's not particularly durable.
That’s what I thought. Naughty really as the unknowing could easily buy contract paint thinking it was what contractors use.

John
 
  • Like
Reactions: Parksy

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts