Plumbing help needed

Jul 18, 2017
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Our washing machine has a water protection box on the end and it sticks out away from the wall as the water outlet is horizontal. To hide the pipes we have a radiator type cover box so a bit of a hassle getting it flush to the wall.
Is there a elbow connection that we can can screw onto the existing water mains outlet and then connect the washing machine to the elbow connection? Most of the ones that I find seem to have a compression fitting which is no good to us. An elbow connection would be simpler than paying a plumber to fit another tap. The other option is a T connection as that will be parallel to the wall, but how do you block up the end that will not be used? Thanks for any advice.


Tap connection.jpg
 

Damian

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Mar 14, 2005
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Presumably the grey coloured box is the water protection box you refer to.
If so, to get it to sit against the wall, just slacken the chrome coloured nut on the water pipe and swivel the box towards the wall, retighten the chrome coloured nut.

Make sure you turn the water off first !!!
 
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Nov 11, 2009
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Our washing machine has a water protection box on the end and it sticks out away from the wall as the water outlet is horizontal. To hide the pipes we have a radiator type cover box so a bit of a hassle getting it flush to the wall.
Is there a elbow connection that we can can screw onto the existing water mains outlet and then connect the washing machine to the elbow connection? Most of the ones that I find seem to have a compression fitting which is no good to us. An elbow connection would be simpler than paying a plumber to fit another tap. The other option is a T connection as that will be parallel to the wall, but how do you block up the end that will not be used? Thanks for any advice.


View attachment 1209
What is the water protection box purpose. Is it to dampen down pressure peaks? New one on me that one.
 

Damian

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Just a question, what is the purpose of the protection box? As already said by otherclive, it is something I have never seen in any plumbing situation I have worked on and I can see no point to it for a washing machine supply.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Thanks good suggestion however it looks almost as if the original plumber used some sort of paste to make a good seal hence the green gunge normally associated with copper.
The next issue is the mains water tap which is in a very awkward position under the kitchen sink and at the back in a corner. Not sure why it is in such an awkward place unless it was easy to get to before the kitchen cabinets were moved and redone.
 
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What is the water protection box purpose. Is it to dampen down pressure peaks? New one on me that one.
From the manual. It is a double solenoid valve directly at the stopcock. In the event that the first valve is defective, the second one closes the inlet. The sheathed inlet hose also ensures the highest level of safety: in the event of damage to the inner hose, water flows down the outer sleeve into the floor tray. Leakages are detected and the water intake is terminated.
 
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If you can't turn off the stop tap in the house there should be one on the perimeter of your property (usually on public footpath) that one turns water off to your house. However some do tend to get stuck as they are not used much, if stuck contact water board
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Thanks good suggestion however it looks almost as if the original plumber used some sort of paste to make a good seal hence the green gunge normally associated with copper.
The next issue is the mains water tap which is in a very awkward position under the kitchen sink and at the back in a corner. Not sure why it is in such an awkward place unless it was easy to get to before the kitchen cabinets were moved and redone.
My father when he approached his nineties had a remote mains shut off fitted as he found it too difficult to access the direct mains tap way back under his sink cupboards. To shut off the mains there was just a button sited near to the front of the cupboard. Dead easy.

You can get wifi controlled ones via a phone app. That would appeal to the technocrats. Useful if you are 200 miles up the M6 and can’t remember turning water off.

https://www.screwfix.com/p/surestop-remote-stop-****-push-fit-15mm/48604
 
Jun 16, 2020
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Thanks good suggestion however it looks almost as if the original plumber used some sort of paste to make a good seal hence the green gunge normally associated with copper.
The next issue is the mains water tap which is in a very awkward position under the kitchen sink and at the back in a corner. Not sure why it is in such an awkward place unless it was easy to get to before the kitchen cabinets were moved and redone.

The stopcock was traditionally place there as legislation dictated that it should be placed as soon as the mains enter the building. It also states that it should enter 500mm inside the building but that seems to be largely ignored.

As OC says, a second valve can be fitted after the initial stopcock but in a convenient location.

To get to my stopcock needs a corner cupboard to be emptied and shelves removed, then to lie flat and squeeze in, then to hope it turns. I fitted a second one but before solenoid valves were available. I put in a half turn valve which comes up to spec. This has proved to be well worth it.

Your picture and description leave questions. Another picture showing a wider view would be useful.

With regards to Damians suggestion, even if paste has been used, loosening and swivelling is an easy job once you have isolated the mains.

John
 
Jan 3, 2012
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In our bungalow the stop tap is in the Bathroom in a small cupboard it in a accessible place and I hope you get the washing machine sorted .
 
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Thanks all. I will give it an attempt over the weekend, I guess OH will be the one that will need to crawl under the kitchen sink counter. LOL!
 
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My father when he approached his nineties had a remote mains shut off fitted as he found it too difficult to access the direct mains tap way back under his sink cupboards. To shut off the mains there was just a button sited near to the front of the cupboard. Dead easy.

You can get wifi controlled ones via a phone app. That would appeal to the technocrats. Useful if you are 200 miles up the M6 and can’t remember turning water off.

https://www.screwfix.com/p/surestop-remote-stop-****-push-fit-15mm/48604

My wife's aunt had one of these and I have to admit it worked a treat, and note it works on water pressure, there is no electrikery involved. It might be worth asking you water company if they will fit one f.o.c. - it is in their interest after all as it means a leak can be stopped very quickly.
 
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Just to add eventually got around to doing the job and all is okay now. Only took me several months and loads of excuses. LOL!
 
Nov 11, 2009
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The stopcock was traditionally place there as legislation dictated that it should be placed as soon as the mains enter the building. It also states that it should enter 500mm inside the building but that seems to be largely ignored.

As OC says, a second valve can be fitted after the initial stopcock but in a convenient location.

To get to my stopcock needs a corner cupboard to be emptied and shelves removed, then to lie flat and squeeze in, then to hope it turns. I fitted a second one but before solenoid valves were available. I put in a half turn valve which comes up to spec. This has proved to be well worth it.

Your picture and description leave questions. Another picture showing a wider view would be useful.

With regards to Damians suggestion, even if paste has been used, loosening and swivelling is an easy job once you have isolated the mains.

John

On the topic of mains shutoff, when we had the kitchen ripped out I was dumbstruck to see that the mains stopcock wasn’t the first item after the water inlet to the house. There were two takeoffs for boiler header tank and hot water header tank. That answered my query when I wanted to do some upstairs plumbing work. When i shut the mains isolator some water services were still live despite running them to drain down. Must have been like that since the previous owners had their kitchen refurbished or even from build. And we criticise caravan makers!!
 
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Jun 16, 2020
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On the topic of mains shutoff, when we had the kitchen ripped out I was dumbstruck to see that the mains stopcock wasn’t the first item after the water inlet to the house. There were two takeoffs for boiler header tank and hot water header tank. That answered my query when I wanted to do some upstairs plumbing work. When i shut the mains isolator some water services were still live despite running them to drain down. Must have been like that since the previous owners had their kitchen refurbished or even from build. And we criticise caravan makers!!

That is surprising as everyone knows that a stopcock goes first, it also makes installation easier. To have to use the street stopcock to add further take offs would mean the pipes would be full of water limiting the options of how to make a connection. The original location of my stopcock was almost impossible to get to. Having to lie in a corner cupboard.

Regarding street stopcock. When working on houses and needing to isolate the water on property built around 1890. During the 60‘s we would turn off the street stopcock. Problem would be it would isolate a complete side of a terraced street. We always had many irate women to deal with.

John
 
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Just a question, what is the purpose of the protection box? As already said by otherclive, it is something I have never seen in any plumbing situation I have worked on and I can see no point to it for a washing machine supply.
Meile use them on their appliances, I think it's called Aquastop. It's a hose within a hose so that if the inner hose fails, a solenoid switches and ensures that water doesn't escape. We had them on an old Meile washing machine, and on a dishwasher.
 
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