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taking Rottweiler cross to France

May 5, 2005
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have adopted a rottie staffie cross, have DNA report, organised pet passport and rabies injection test. Understand these are on dangerous dogs list in France, she is a real softie though and well socialised, expat forum suggests muzzle and short lead is sufficient for visiting, has anyone else done this or got advice
 
Feb 17, 2018
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I am watching this post with interest, as we would like to visit the Normandy landings, but will not go, unless we can take Bella.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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DeliDave said:
have adopted a rottie staffie cross, have DNA report, organised pet passport and rabies injection test. Understand these are on dangerous dogs list in France, she is a real softie though and well socialised, expat forum suggests muzzle and short lead is sufficient for visiting, has anyone else done this or got advice
Easily found on the web. Rotweilers and Staffies are banned in France. The authorities dont go by DNA testing it is down to what the dog looks like, and the decision of the official.

You would find it neigh on impossible to visit campsite and again it is the owners decision and interpretation of what looks like a banned dog.
 
Jan 31, 2018
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Disgusting. if you think these dogs are dangerous you are looking at the wrong end of the lead. Statistically there are far more dangerous dogs out there . If you delve deeper the Staffy thing seems to actually mean Pitbulls BUT there are exemptions for visiting dogs and a muzzle is enough. Apparently! Lots of internet chitter on it and conflicting evidence-think we need more info if anyone out there can provide definitive advice but in the mean time we won't be going to France.
 
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Sep 5, 2016
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I lnow people like their dogs but on site I don't like them next to me espicially a rotweiler no matter how cuddly and sft it is , if the french do not want the type of dog in their country then adibe by their laws,
 
Nov 11, 2009
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camel said:
I lnow people like their dogs but on site I don't like them next to me espicially a rotweiler no matter how cuddly and sft it is , if the french do not want the type of dog in their country then adibe by their laws,
When we took our dogs to France they were always tethered when on site. Apart from La Tournerie near Montignac where we had a choice of pitches that were enclosed. Trouble was Springers clear four foot sheep fences without any problem if they see a rabbit or one of us coming back from the block. :) On with the tethers!
 
Nov 21, 2019
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Hi, unfortunately Rotties and Staffies are on the banned breeds list for France, along with many other countries.
It may be possible to take them into France, but usually they require pedigree papers.

There is some more information and links on these blogs.

https://worldwidewalkies.blog/2018/02/16/killer-caterpillars-gunmen-chien-interdit-8-things-you-need-to-know-about-taking-your-dog-to-france/

https://worldwidewalkies.blog/2018/02/09/travelling-from-the-uk-to-europe-back-with-dogs/

I have clipped this excerpt from the Pet Travel Website which suggests that Rotties might not need pedigree papers. https://www.pettravel.com/immigration/France.cfm

France prohibits the import of the following breeds without pedigree certification: Staffordshire Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers or Tosa. These breeds must be a registered pedigree. Crossbreeds are not permitted. Mastiff and Boerbull breeds and their crosses may not be imported.

American Staffordshire Terriers, Staffordshire Terriers and Japanese Tosas can be imported to France as class 2 guard dogs only with pedigree papers. Rottweilers may also be imported as class 2 dogs without pedigree papers.

Owners of class 2 dogs must conform to import regulations above. Owners must have insurance to protect against liability. Your dog must receive approval from the local town council, have a detention permit, have behavioral evaluations and be leashed and muzzled when in public.

Mastiffs and Boerboels are not permitted.
 
Jan 31, 2018
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We absolutely don't need France! Saves worrying about vets and rabies jab then-he starts to quiver if we even drive in to the village where the vets is! Can't help it if the French have no taste.
 

Parksy

Moderator
Nov 12, 2009
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camel said:
I lnow people like their dogs but on site I don't like them next to me espicially a rotweiler no matter how cuddly and sft it is , if the french do not want the type of dog in their country then adibe by their laws,
Everyone has a point of view about dogs on holiday parks or campsites Camel, but if you had read Deli Dave's original query you would see and accept that he is attempting to discover what laws if any could potentially affect his trips to France with his dog.
He is using this forum try to to find out exactly what law he needs to abide by.
 
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Nov 16, 2015
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Hi DeliDave, This site https://petolog.com/articles/banned-dogs.html, points to the fact that Staffie X are a type 2 classified dog,

Our Labradoodle , a first Generation,, so a real Mogerl, when he was young we used a head harness and the French thought it was a muzzel and would not come near him, so it was better to not use it. He is now on his second Passport. . If your going to caravan with the dog, send them a photo of yourself and the dog, and see if the site owners are happy to accept you both, Good luck.
 
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Nov 16, 2015
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Grizzly, We have Dutch friends who have a seasonal pitch At Montoil sur Mer, they have a Douge de Borgoine, (spelling) very similar to Bella, but at times they have problems in the local town, as Sarah, the dog, was very protective, and classed as a type 2 dangerous dog. I hope this helps.
 
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Feb 17, 2018
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Camel
I agree if the french do not allow those breeds then so be it, they miss out on the money i would spend in their country..

Bella has a pedigree longer than my arm, and is from pure german stock, again you can not judgea breed, without knowing the dog. Certain dogs do misbehave, it is not the dogs fault but the owner, and to genaralise about a breed is not an exact science, just hearsay.
 
Mar 2, 2010
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Sorry for disappearing , have had an email from French Tourist Office, Rottweilers and crosses are Class 2, allowed in France but must be muzzled and on lead in public places,transport and thoroughfares. Am taking email and translation with me. if anyone in similar situation needs a copy, feel free to contact me through Mods,
Thanks Steve (Parksy)
 

Damian

Moderator
Mar 14, 2005
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feel free to contact me through Mods,
With the new Forum platform there is no need to contact each other via the Moderators.
Just click on the users name or avatar and a pop up will appear with a button "Start Conversation"
Fill in what you want to say and send...…..it is the Personal Message facility.
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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About 3 years ago we were on a campsite in France minding our own business. The wife had taken our dogs for a run on the beach and was returning when a large dog that was inside a motorhome and not on a lead, flew out the door and attacked our Yorkshire Terrier for no reason causing a few injuries and cost at vet was in excess of £200. The owner of the dog did pay most of the costs but where leaving on the same day so we were unable to get any further costs.
The dog was a cross shepherd collie type dog. Seems that other dogs could be just as dangerous no matter where they are. Campsite owner advised us that he had told the couple with the dog that they were not allowed back on the campsite.
 

Damian

Moderator
Mar 14, 2005
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Seems that other dogs could be just as dangerous no matter where they are.
I often wonder when people will realise that no matter how docile your dog may be, it has, as they all do, have a trigger point where they can turn in an instant and follow their defence and attack mode.
The problem is, until that trigger is activated, no one knows what it is, and then it is too late.

Also, just because one dog appears to like every other dog, many other dogs do not like suddenly being approached by an unknown animal, not every dog likes every other dog !!

I have had dogs for a very long time, mainly large breeds, like my Great Dane, but also Bullmastiffs, Mastiffs, Lurchers and more recently Boston Terriers.

Individually they like most things, especially people and are not bothered by other dogs, but when we are all out together, it is a different matter, they are a pack and act as such, and because I know how they act, they are never off the lead when walking together.

But, often a loose dog will run towards us and that is seen as a threat by the pack and as they cannot use their Flight mode and run away, as they are on leads, they go into fight mode and should the loose dog get within reach, they will bite.

I have the advantage of having a local farm where I am the only person allowed to take the dogs onto for exercise and working, but even so, some people who do not have permission get onto the land and let their dogs off the lead, and then get very abusive when told in no uncertain terms to go away.

When they are working and a loose dog appears then they see that as prey and act accordingly, but to educate some people is impossible, but big vets bills seem to resonate and focus their minds.
 

Mel

Mar 17, 2007
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Well put Damian. It seems that increasingly dogs are being regarded as people or children; and folks forget that they are animals and therefore respond accordingly when triggered. I love my dog but she is a collie and a classic collie trait is to get grumpy with any dog that is in her face. If they ignore her, she ignores them. No good me being sentimental about it; I have to manage it.
Mel
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Well put Damian. It seems that increasingly dogs are being regarded as people or children; and folks forget that they are animals and therefore respond accordingly when triggered. I love my dog but she is a collie and a classic collie trait is to get grumpy with any dog that is in her face. If they ignore her, she ignores them. No good me being sentimental about it; I have to manage it.
Mel
One of my Springers was called “ Mrs Grumpy” by family and friends she was/is absolutely fine with people and my grandchildren. But she suffered from spontaneous rage and would attack other dogs without any normal warning signs. So if I saw other dogs she was always put on a lead in good time. But the number of owners that would encourage their dogs to go towards her and “say hello” was infuriating. If someone has their dog on a short tight lead and pulled in tight it should be pretty clear they don’t want other dogs coming up to it.
Anyway Mrs Grumpy still has to be watched even at 13 years old. But now she just curls her lip and bares teeth or just stands and tolerates interlopers. I put her traits down to the fact that prior to me rehoming her she was kept in a small backyard and bullied by two Sharpei. But she’s fine with my other Springer and my daughters Springer too.
 
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