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If you have an outside aluminum table that is painted, how long would you expect it to last before it starts to corrode. Bubbles are coming up through the paintwork on the edge of the table and the paint is not broken anywhere. Could this happen in less than the space of a year?
 
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If you have an outside aluminum table that is painted, how long would you expect it to last before it starts to corrode. Bubbles are coming up through the paintwork on the edge of the table and the paint is not broken anywhere. Could this happen in less than the space of a year?
I will tell you next year as our aluminium table was only purchased in August. The chairs are now in the garage and the table is under a tarpaulin strapped tight. I must admit I wasn’t that keen on buying it but occasionally OH gets her way. My concerns mirrored yours. I have a protective cover unused that’s not required as I preferred the tarpaulin.

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It is supposed to be an outdoor table so thought no need to cover it. I thought aluminum is supposed to be quite robust especially if coated with paint. Only the top is aluminum. The legs seem to be steel?
 
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It is supposed to be an outdoor table so thought no need to cover it. I thought aluminum is supposed to be quite robust especially if coated with paint. Only the top is aluminum. The legs seem to be steel?
Aluminium is robust but I wouldn’t lay a bet on the paint coatings lasting long term. Then it becomes another task to restore it. Give me wood any time. But I guess we have good old CRA 2015 to fall back on 😱Sorry couldn’t resist
 
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Aluminium is robust but I wouldn’t lay a bet on the paint coatings lasting long term. Then it becomes another task to restore it. Give me wood any time. But I guess we have good old CRA 2015 to fall back on 😱Sorry couldn’t resist
I will update you at some point. (y) :)
 
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Your tables will NOT be Aluminium, but an Aluminium Alloy. Aluminium on its own is too soft a material, but does have the ability to create it's own protective surface as does Copper, ie the Greenish / brown sheen.
Unfortunately the protective surface is what is you are seeing lifting the paintwork. Normally a chromate protective paint is used on top of a chemically clean alloy surface prior to final painting.
The tables are probably made from a much used Chinesium alloy.
 
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Your tables will NOT be Aluminium, but an Aluminium Alloy. Aluminium on its own is too soft a material, but does have the ability to create it's own protective surface as does Copper, ie the Greenish / brown sheen.
Unfortunately the protective surface is what is you are seeing lifting the paintwork. Normally a chromate protective paint is used on top of a chemically clean alloy surface prior to final painting.
Mine has aluminium legs (alloy) but if Buckmans has steel legs I hope the two metals where they join are isolated from each other or there are ideal conditions for galvanic corrosion.
 
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Your tables will NOT be Aluminium, but an Aluminium Alloy. Aluminium on its own is too soft a material, but does have the ability to create it's own protective surface as does Copper, ie the Greenish / brown sheen.
Unfortunately the protective surface is what is you are seeing lifting the paintwork. Normally a chromate protective paint is used on top of a chemically clean alloy surface prior to final painting.
The tables are probably made from a much used Chinesium alloy.
Thanks learn something new everyday. The description for the table clearly stated that the top is aluminum. Does that mean our aluminum ladder is also made from an alloy?

Mine has aluminium legs (alloy) but if Buckmans has steel legs I hope the two metals where they join are isolated from each other or there are ideal conditions for galvanic corrosion.
I have heard of this issue with aluminum?
 
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Thanks learn something new everyday. The description for the table clearly stated that the top is aluminum. Does that mean our aluminum ladder is also made from an alloy?


I have heard of this issue with aluminum?
Your ladder will most certainly be of an Aluminium Alloy, as I mentioned Aluminium is very soft, when aircraft skins were first made they were made of Alclad, Aluminium Alloy with a very thin skin of Aluminium as this has self protecting properties. .
Dissimilar metal corrosion, ( Galvanic reaction) will cause a whitish powder to form, at the joint.
On Underwater items , Boats, Oil and gas platforms, outboard engines, a zinc plate will be attached which will corroded quicker than the main body of the item it is attached to.
OC might give more information on this.
 
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I am really chuffed with the replies as learning a lot. I used a table as an example, but with Hutch's replies I will be honest and highlight the true nature of my problem. I apologise if you felt I misled you initially, but I needed to gain some input first.

In mid August last year I purchased our current Jeep second hand and it is brilliant to drive etc. It had done less than 7k before an issue was spotted. In early Aug this year I bought a snow foam kit to wash down the car myself. On doing so I noticed bubbles on the leading edge of the the bonnet. The picture shows one bubble, but on closer examination there are a number of other very small bubbles.

The Jeep franchised dealer from whom we bought has tried their best to fob me off insisting that I should be doing all the running around and finding approved Jeep bodyshops. Basically denying all responsibility! Some that thinking was quickly rectified by myself and eventually they gave me a list of approved body shops, but I was still had to chase around. I have kept a copy of all correspondence relating to the issue.

The hood is supposed to be an Aluminum alloy and is bonded to a steel frame. Apparently there is a bi-metal reaction that maybe causing the bubbles. A body shop expert has examined the bonnet and because there was an earlier repair, the metal is now too thin to repair and a new bonnet is required at a cost of over £3000!

The approved body shop who examined the vehicle on two different occasions used different people and they all agreed that it was probably a manufacturing defect and an incorrect primer may have been used. They went onto state that they have had other Jeeps through with a similar issue.

The approved body shop has stated that due to the repair and current amount of corrosion, the fault would have been there at at time of purchase and they have supplied this in writing. I am beginning to suspect that the supplier may have had the repair done off the books to sell the vehicle which is why they were dragging their heels or maybe the previous owner had the repair done prior to trading in the vehicle.

Due to lack of action from supplier and finance house, the matter has now been escalated to FOS who have agreed we have a case. In the meantime we also contacted Jeep UK direct as the Jeep is supposed to have a 7 year panel warranty for corrosion but weirdly only if the are shows signs of pitting!

I also found out that the dealer had not submitted any claims to Jeep UK although the dealer indicated they had progressed the claim to Jeep UK. They are not answering emails to confirm or deny.

Jeep UK will be contacting the body shop to verify whether it is a manufacturing fault or not, but i strongly suspect it is due to the number of posts littering various Jeep forums.

We do not want to be paying out over £3k for a vehicle that was not even a year old from purchase date when the issue came to light. If the go ahead is given and bonnet is replaced, maybe earthing the steel frame would help. Not sure if a zinc plate somewhere would help?


Bonnet bubble1.jpg
 
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With your problem being where it is, it is very possibly started by a minute stone chip, getting under the paint and starting the corrosion.
I remember you mentioned the paint problems after you bought the car.
But if this is supposed to be a common problem there could be a manufacturing problem . Especially at the edge of the bonnet.
Rather than replacing the whole bonnet, I would have thought a rub back to bare metal and a respray would have been a better and cheaper idea.
Where are our car restorers ? They should be able to give a much better reply than myself.
 
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Your ladder will most certainly be of an Aluminium Alloy, as I mentioned Aluminium is very soft, when aircraft skins were first made they were made of Alclad, Aluminium Alloy with a very thin skin of Aluminium as this has self protecting properties. .
Dissimilar metal corrosion, ( Galvanic reaction) will cause a whitish powder to form, at the joint.
On Underwater items , Boats, Oil and gas platforms, outboard engines, a zinc plate will be attached which will corroded quicker than the main body of the item it is attached to.
OC might give more information on this.
I gave up when the copper under hull sheathing fell off🤣
 
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With your problem being where it is, it is very possibly started by a minute stone chip, getting under the paint and starting the corrosion.
I remember you mentioned the paint problems after you bought the car.
But if this is supposed to be a common problem there could be a manufacturing problem . Especially at the edge of the bonnet.
Rather than replacing the whole bonnet, I would have thought a rub back to bare metal and a respray would have been a better and cheaper idea.
Where are our car restorers ? They should be able to give a much better reply than myself.
Confirmed by body shop definitely not started by a stone chip as paint is not broken and the issue is more obvious under the bonnet and right along the leading edge of the bonnet.
 
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Update. The manufacturer has agreed to pay 75% of the cost of the bonnet replacement. I think this confirms that it is a manufacturing fault and that the fault was there prior to us purchasing the vehicle last year, Now to get the dealer to pay the balance may be a battle?
 
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Update. The manufacturer has agreed to pay 75% of the cost of the bonnet replacement. I think this confirms that it is a manufacturing fault and that the fault was there prior to us purchasing the vehicle last year, Now to get the dealer to pay the balance may be a battle?
Good outcome so far. Hope the dealer picks up the rest of the bill.
 
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This is unbelievable! The Ombudsman ruled in our favour and the finance house agreed to pay the 25% balance.

As I had supplied two quotes the Ombudsman, they requested that finance house contact the preferred body shop and authorise the repair. The Jeep finance house are refusing to respond defying legislation and leaving everyone high and dry.

Ombudsman is now escalating the matter.
 
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Any possibility there is moisture in the ‘well’ where the gas jet is sited? This has happened to me on my rectangular 3 ring hob. Once the pan rest and the elements of the hob have been removed a dry with kitchen towel has corrected the problem.
I think you posted in the wrong thread?
 
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Thankyou / you are correct / not sure how that occurred but I have copied to the correct thread and now deleted from here! Maybe the mods can now delete this and your prompt from here!
 
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Sounds like a good outcome! I've been restoring classic cars for 35 years and some of the galvanic corrosion I have seen between steel and aluminium panels is incredible. Bodging up corrosion before a sale has been common in the car industry for years.

A few years back (1990's) my ex-brother-in-law worked in the bodyshop of a Ford main dealer and they had a lot of Ford Escorts come in for wheel arch corrosion repairs to be done under warranty. The customers were all told that "all of the rusted panel would be cut out and replaced with a new wheel arch and fully rust proofed etc". As soon as the car was in the body shop they were instructed to "fill it and paint it".
 

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