Butane Bottle Level

Nov 11, 2009
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EH52ARH said:
Take the bottle out and give it a shake. If it feels very low I carry a spare bottle.

My approach too. Even the Calorlite with gauge doesn’t show low until it’s quite low. It drops down quickly. After a while you can begin to gauge gas usage.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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Poundland suitcase-airline weight-gauge, deduct tare weight from gross weight (stamped on the bottle), simples ;)
 
Mar 14, 2005
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There have been several systems aimed at giving the user an easy means of determining the state of the bottle.

One of the simplest, is strip of temperature sensitive liquid crystal. It is supposed to see a temperature difference between the liquified gas, and the vapour above it. This is based on the way the liquified gas uses the temperature of the liquid to boil the gas to produce vapour. The more gas being used cools the liquid portion, and the liquid crystal will change colour, showing the level of the liquid. If only small amount is being used, the temperature difference between the liquid phase and the vapour may not be enough to show a clear temperature difference. If no gas has been used for an hour or so the temperature will equalise so the indicator will not show the level.

Bottle pressure gauges. As has already been stated, these only really show when the bottle is near the end. This is because whilst there is any liquified gas in the bottle, the liquid will boil to replenish the pressure which is dependant on the temperature of the bottle. Only when the liquid has all boiler leaving just vapour, the pressure will drop as the vapour is used up.

Several attempts have been made to assess the depth of the liquified gas using ultrasonics. Using a transducer fitted to the underside of the cylinder, sonar pulse is emitted, and it's transmitted through the cylinder wall and into the liquid. When pulse reaches a change of density, some of the signal is reflected back. The time it takes to return to the transducer is proportional to the depth of the liquid. These systems can be fooled by reflections from the walls of the cylinder, so they need to be carefully set up.

LPG is almost always sold by weight. This is because the energy it contains is constant amount by weight. So the only way of accurately establishing the amount of gas in a cylinder is by weighing it, and subtracting the tare weight of the bottle. LPG bottles from reputable companies will always have their tare weight visible on the outside of the bottle.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Yes it was Vic, but I was prempting any bright spark the suggested the other methods, both of which can work but not as reliably as simple weighing.
 
Jun 2, 2015
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the only acurate way, as has been said (and rather drawnoutedly by Proff) is to weigh the bottle and deduct the tare weight (the weight of the empty bottle) from your reading.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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Fithawk said:
Thanks for all the reply’s. Carry on shaking it is then and maybe a trip to Lidl :whistle:

I would have saved up and splashed out on the digital LIDL one just for the kudos of carrying it around on my waist belt, gaining the envy of all my caravan counterparts .

I realised I couldn't afford a replacement battery when the original needs to be replaced :p
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Weighing is the best way !
But so called airline scales can vary in accuracy considerably - up to 1kg difference in my experience which is a lot if you are weighing a bottle contents nominal 6Kg.
So suggest you check the accuracy of any one you buy and note the error.
Easiest method is to weigh something like a 6 litre bottle of mineral water, or one or more 2 litre bottles of cola put in a thin plastic supermarket bag. You can ignorethe weight of bag and bottle - each litre will be near enough 1 kg,
You can still use this to weigh you gas bottle but remember to 'aim off' by whatever difference you found in the test weigh.
You also need to remember to weigh the new gas bottle when just bought as you cannot rely implicitly on the tare weight stamped on the bottle. The bottle will be filled by 'weight added' so you should be able to rely on the fill being what you have paid for.

I did it my weigh (sorry)
 
Apr 19, 2017
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RayS said:
.......as you cannot rely implicitly on the tare weight stamped on the bottle. The bottle will be filled by 'weight added' so you should be able to rely on the fill being what you have paid for.

I would certainly hope the tare weight marked is correct...or 'Weights and Measures' (as they used to be called) will soon be on the case :lol: (Just for anyone who doesn't already realise, the tare weight on the collar of traditional Calor cylinders is in lb/oz, so you need to do a bit of simple arithmetic).

FWIW, my (LIDL digital|) scales always indicate that cylinders are within 0.1kg (the scale resolution) of the expected weight, both full and empty.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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I'm sure you are right Vic particularly in UK. Most of my experience has been with Continental bottles where they may be a bit more relaxed about this sort of thing. I've had one on which the error on actual and stamped tare corresponded to about a week's worth of gas, and another where the fill was generous by about twice this much.
Running out is a bit more serious as we only have one nominal 12.5Kg bottle, but gas is so cheap in Spain it's no problem to change just before than just after ' empty' about £13.50 for 12.5 Kg earlier this year.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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I have managed to grab a few days away, on site right now and surprise! free wifi and it works perfectly, now that is nice for a £20.00 a night all in for 2, ehu etc.

Anyway, I am going to try out (and calibrate) my luxury Poundland luggage scales.

Hoping to put VicMallows in his place with his overly extravagant Lidl scales claims :silly: .

Will let you all know (not that you are very interested :lol: ).

Weather tomorrow is overcast, thereafter the forecast is rather good (and no! before you ask, my Poundland scales do not have a built in barometer).

Nice to get away though.
 
Jun 11, 2012
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Truma actually manufacture a device for checking gas bottle levels. Ive just googled gas bottle level checker which takes you to you tube all the demos on there .
Sir Roger
 
Nov 11, 2009
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ProfJohnL said:
You could also use the bathroom scales that you will be carrying for checking nose loads B)

That’s a far better approach as it would give the elderly their weight bearing excecise too :)
 
Mar 14, 2005
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otherclive said:
ProfJohnL said:
You could also use the bathroom scales that you will be carrying for checking nose loads B)

That’s a far better approach as it would give the elderly their weight bearing excecise too :)

And here's another thought, you could use them to weigh everything you buy so you know how much weight your adding to the caravan, And an absolute brain wave here, you could even take them home with you and stand on them so you can reach that shelf you put up 40 mm too highB-)

What can you do with your bathroom scales?;-)
 

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