Buying used caravan without a CRiS registration

Feb 13, 2020
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Hi,
I'm looking to buy a used caravan and was wondering what opinions there are on whether you would buy if it's not been CRiS registered. I understand that the scheme can only offer reasonable certainty, but without it, how would you know that it wasn't stolen, damaged or had finance on it? The 'reason' given for not being registered is that they are an import (it's a Go Pod) but wouldn't that be one of the first things you would do if you bought it from new?
Thanks in advance,
Clare.
 

Damian

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Mar 14, 2005
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The CRiS registration is only applicable to UK made vans, imports are not generally registered with CRiS unless the owner registers it, which many , like me, do not.

Many EU made vans do have their own registration document from the maker, so this is something you should ask about.

As for the question " wouldn't that be one of the first things you would do if you bought it from new ", the answer is no, as the CRiS database relies on new owners, after the first automatic registration for UK made vans, informing them of change, which many folk do not.

One of the main things to think about is the content of the advert, and who is selling it, where is it, and see as much documentation as possible.
If the van is at someones house. then in all probability everything is in order.
If the van is elsewhere, for instance can only be seen in a layby, or service station, then that kind of thing should ring alarm bells.
 
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Feb 13, 2020
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What's ringing alarm bells is that pics are in a dealership but seller is a private seller. I think that the pics are from the dealer they bought it from. After we bought our current campervan I spotted it 'for sale' again on another website, so I'm a bit cautious! I've always been used to being able to HPi check a vehicle. It just feels like there's a higher chance of being out of pocket than when I've bought a van.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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The CRiS registration is only applicable to UK made vans, imports are not generally registered with CRiS unless the owner registers it, which many , like me, do not.

Many EU made vans do have their own registration document from the maker, so this is something you should ask about.

As for the question " wouldn't that be one of the first things you would do if you bought it from new ", the answer is no, as the CRiS database relies on new owners, after the first automatic registration for UK made vans, informing them of change, which many folk do not.

One of the main things to think about is the content of the advert, and who is selling it, where is it, and see as much documentation as possible.
If the van is at someones house. then in all probability everything is in order.
If the van is elsewhere, for instance can only be seen in a layby, or service station, then that kind of thing should ring alarm bells.
I bought a used Trigano Silver import and the importers then previous owners had not registered it. But the sellers had all manufacturing documents, service sheets, insurance documents and putrchase invoice from importer, and it was at their house. They had also used it in France and Spain over the period 2009-16. So I satisfied myself that it was okay.
If you do go ahead make sure that it hasn’t been loaded up with kit that uses up its payload. Mine was somewhat of a hybrid and instead of 240 kg payload it only had around 40 kg. So a battery and gas bottle was all it could carry.

There’s a picture of the Trigano pop top in the Wannabee Caravanner thread. Must say it was beautifully made and watertight and towed well
 
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JTQ

May 7, 2005
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Go Pod co uk state that their imports are not Chris registered at source, it being something the buyer has to undertake themselves.

It points to the story being genuine. Is there no way the seller can furnish you with the original receipt, all but absolutely proving title?

With that I would tend to accept things, should I want a Go_POD, and its condition is good for the price you can buy it for. As the probability you will face is that will be the situation with any you try to buy second-hand.
I suspect the buying options second-hand are not extensive for such a way out niche model.


Edit: As it is sold through a dealer, I would explore with my Club's legal team, if paying a deposit via a credit card will gain you some legal protection, at least financially if the product later turns out to not be legit.
 
Last edited:
Nov 11, 2009
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Go Pod co uk state that their imports are not Chris registered at source, it being something the buyer has to undertake themselves.

It points to the story being genuine. Is there no way the seller can furnish you with the original receipt, all but absolutely proving title?

With that I would tend to accept things, should I want a Go_POD, and its condition is good for the price you can buy it for. As the probability you will face is that will be the situation with any you try to buy second-hand.
I suspect the buying options second-hand are not extensive for such a way out niche model.


Edit: As it is sold through a dealer, I would explore with my Club's legal team, if paying a deposit via a credit card will gain you some legal protection, at least financially if the product later turns out to not be legit.
Whilst paying the deposit to a dealer (over the £100) gets you Section 75 protection via a card. If it’s being sold via a dealer then CRA2015 is a far better protection. But the OP says it is being sold privately. There are web sites selling motorhomes that just act as marketing agents fir the seller. Near us there’s a well respected store that sells caravans either in their own right or on behalf of a customer ( on commission). But the sale terms vary dependant on the option offered.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Because caravans do not have to be formally registered in the UK it does make it harder to be totally satisfied about a seller's right to sell a caravan. All you can do is to be a careful about checking what documentation there is, Don't be rushed or pushed, after all its probably a big chunk of money your going to invest. If something does not seem right, and ask the seller. If the answers don't satisfy you, don't risk it and walk away.

Whilst we do have some of the best consumer rights if things go wrong, but they can be more difficult to invoke if you have not been diligent in checking before agreeing to purchase. Buyer beware.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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You are probably right Clive, but I am not legally up with all the nuances of how such transactions, where a dealer is involved, pan out. The dealer is "selling" in the wider sense, so I can't see he can be totally immune to the legalities of "selling".
That's what I would use my free readily available legal advice to explore and thus better understand.
 
Jan 19, 2002
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Worth having a look on the importers site - they have new and used (https://www.go-pods.co.uk/go-pods-shop/cat_1566671-3-PreOwned-GoPods.html) - I believe they are Preston direction so they are prepared to contact an owner in your locality who is prepared to allow you to view theirs. Also you can compare models and specs on both new and used - currently pods between about 8000 and 12000 used. The standard model comes with a tarp that fits into the small rail above the door, but it is worth finding one with the pop-up awning that also uses the rail and provides an enclosed space at the rear of the pod.
 
May 7, 2012
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I would go with Damiens point on the caravan has to be at the sellers address. If the photos are from a dealers then I would check the one for sale against these to establish it is the same one if possible. Given you cannot check if it is on HP or stolen then I would be wary as if it was then you could lose it.
If they bought it from a dealer then they should have a valid receipt for this. If they do not have one then they cannot prove ownership and I would avoid it.
 
Feb 13, 2020
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Thanks for everyone's advice. I think the fact that I was asking the question in the first place probably means that I'm a bit suspicious but with your suggestions of what to look for I think that I'll give this particular one a wide berth - it's a long way from us to go and take a punt on it being a good buy when you don't have enough information to go on. Unfortunately they are a bit niche but there are a couple a closer to home that would be a safer (but bit more expensive) bet to check out. Thanks for the advice on what to look out for.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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I believe you have made a wise decision Clare. Buying from a private person gives you very little protection if any at all. Buying from a dealer gives you all the consumer statutory protections.
 
May 7, 2012
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Not sure if it is the caravan involved here but someone on the C&CC forum was complaining about having trouble selling one of these. It does seem the problems raised here were spotted by others as well.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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You are probably right Clive, but I am not legally up with all the nuances of how such transactions, where a dealer is involved, pan out. The dealer is "selling" in the wider sense, so I can't see he can be totally immune to the legalities of "selling".
That's what I would use my free readily available legal advice to explore and thus better understand.
It is often suggested in this forum the CRA only applies to businesses. This isn't actually true. The way the legislation is written it refers to sellers and not specifically formal businesses. Consequently and in theory all the provisions of the act should apply to all private sales as well as retail sales.

The reality is somewhat more practical, and you are more likely to get full redress from a business becasue as a business they are deemed to have more focused experience on the products the sell and should be more able to describe a product accurately (even secondhand items) than a private seller might. So for caravans, things like the ability to find and recognise damp issues, the capability to sort out electrical and gas installations etc should be in the purview of a dealer more so than a private seller.

In the 1970's, One of my relatives decided to buy a lawn mower. He saw an advert for a private sale in the newspaper and he contacted the phone number to arrange to go and view the mower. He spoke to man who agreed he could come the following day, He would not be there but he would tell his wife to expect him.

When he arrived the lady of the house agreed there was a mower for sale and she pulled the mower out of the shed for him to see. It was the same make and models as described in the advert, and was in good but used condition. He thought the price was very reasonable. So he paid cash and brought it home.

A few hours later he received a phone call from a man who was very angry. He accused my relative of taking the wrong mower. It transpired that his ***** wife had pulled the wrong **** mower out of the shed and it should have been an identical but much older one he had put in the *****garage. He told my relative to return the ******mower. However because of the mans rude approach and other unmentionable things he called his own wife whilst on the phone, my relative was reluctant and stood firm on the deal he had struck. The man finished the call by the man saying he'd be *****contacting his solicitor.

A few days later my relative received a solicitors letter asking for the mower to be returned so it can be replaced with one the man had intended to be sold. My relative contacted his own solicitor, who said the matter falls under what constituted the sale of goods act of the time , and in his opinion the sale was conducted correctly within the terms of the act and legally there was no need to accede to the request.

He cited :
The goods were publicly advertised and identified at an address. The lady at the address had the same surname name and address as on the original purchase bills from a local garden shop, so that was evidence of title to sell.

She had access to all the keys to get the mower out of the shed where it was kept, and there was no other mower in sight. The goods exactly matched the description for both make and model and the fact it was used.

The price being asked seemed fair less than the models of the same age in the shops, so the contract was agreed and completed as title passed to my relative.

A copy was duly sent to the man, and no more was heard.

We always speculate what condition the older mower was actually in and whether my relative would have bought it? We also wondered what the relationship between the couple was like afterwards?

The point is the relevant law applied to this private sale, just as much as if it had been a trader involved. It was in fact this case that alerted me to the consumer rights and how it all actually works.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Ray is absolutely correct. The Consumer Rights Act came into force on 1 October 2015 and covers the purchase of goods, digital content and services including new and used cars from official dealers (it doesn't apply to private sales) as well as servicing, repairs and maintenance work. Products must be: Of satisfactory quality.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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To avoid waking up in the van at 3..am some morning in future and wondering whether it is all legal, suggest you scratch this one and start again .
 
Jan 3, 2012
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This was a Few years ago we brought our Seasonal Caravan from a dealer he had Sold it from new to a buyer locally the service book was stamp up but the buyer had forgotton to Registered CRIS . i brought it with the understanding the dealer had supplied and Sold it from new and i got a letter from the buyer confirming this ..
 
May 7, 2012
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A seasonal one is a bit safer I think as being on a site for a long period you are almost certain to be who you say you are. You should still do an HPI check though.
 
Jan 3, 2012
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This was a few year ago Also the caravan dealer did a HPI check i forgot to mention and that was fine also i did CRIS it came back me as the first owner .
 
Jan 3, 2012
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A seasonal one is a bit safer I think as being on a site for a long period you are almost certain to be who you say you are. You should still do an HPI check though.
Just look at the paperwork there was aHPI check by the caravan dealer who Sold it to me as well Ray
 
Jan 3, 2012
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Also we Sold the Seasonal Caravan and the new buyer was very happy with it and we put the money down on the Touring Caravan we have now ..
 

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