Caravan movers

Mar 30, 2005
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Have tried a forum search but can't find any threads - please, advice needed - what are the pros and cons of the various power driven caravan movers on the market? We have a single axle Bailey Pageant (1350 kg) and our storage pitch is quite tight to get in & out of, plus moving on & off pitches - what would you recommend and why? Does a mover drain the 12v battery badly? Or does it need its own power supply?

Thanks for your help
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Only you can decide if the fitting of any kind of mover is worth it! You need to balance the benefits/drawbacks of each system against you own perceived or real needs. However can I raise some of the issues that you might consider before taking a decision?

Generic types - There are basically two types of movers currently available.

Those that fit to the front of the caravan A frame (ball hitch or jockey wheel), that have their own battery,

And those that fit to the caravan chassis and drive the caravans own main wheels.

Availability- The A frame types need to be fitted to the caravan each time you want to use it, and it must be removed for towing. So If you want the mover on-site you must make provision for carrying it and its battery in the car or caravan and in doing so consider if you would need to lift it in and out. The chassis types are fitted and stay with the caravan at all times.

2) Weight - The chassis types are heavier than the A frame types thus reduce a caravans payload capacity by a greater margin.

3) Effectiveness - Regardless of the type of mover in use it is a physical fact that the pulling or pushing force (Drawbar) is directly related to the weight (Down force) on the driven wheel. A frame types have only their own weight and the nose weight of the caravan, whilst the chassis type benefits of the weight of the whole caravan on its driving wheels. This simple fact has a major impact on the safe usage of the mover.

The amount of drawbar required is dependant on the surface conditions, so having a clear understanding of the land types it will be used on is essential and will affect the type of unit you choose. If your need is to be able to move a caravan over hard flat surfaces, then the A frame types will perform quite adequately. For rough or uneven ground the chassis type will be more effective

4) Safety- Consider a flat surface leading to a downward ramp. On the flat surface either type of mover will move the caravan with safety. But starting down the ramp the weight of the caravan will start to push the mover, and could cause it to skid and loose control. The A frame units are more prone to this problem than chassis units

5) Cost- In general, the A frame types area cheaper than the chassis types, but cost isn't everything, so it is vitally important that you consider the job you will be asking the system to perform.
 
Mar 30, 2005
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Only you can decide if the fitting of any kind of mover is worth it! You need to balance the benefits/drawbacks of each system against you own perceived or real needs. However can I raise some of the issues that you might consider before taking a decision?

Generic types - There are basically two types of movers currently available.

Those that fit to the front of the caravan A frame (ball hitch or jockey wheel), that have their own battery,

And those that fit to the caravan chassis and drive the caravans own main wheels.

Availability- The A frame types need to be fitted to the caravan each time you want to use it, and it must be removed for towing. So If you want the mover on-site you must make provision for carrying it and its battery in the car or caravan and in doing so consider if you would need to lift it in and out. The chassis types are fitted and stay with the caravan at all times.

2) Weight - The chassis types are heavier than the A frame types thus reduce a caravans payload capacity by a greater margin.

3) Effectiveness - Regardless of the type of mover in use it is a physical fact that the pulling or pushing force (Drawbar) is directly related to the weight (Down force) on the driven wheel. A frame types have only their own weight and the nose weight of the caravan, whilst the chassis type benefits of the weight of the whole caravan on its driving wheels. This simple fact has a major impact on the safe usage of the mover.

The amount of drawbar required is dependant on the surface conditions, so having a clear understanding of the land types it will be used on is essential and will affect the type of unit you choose. If your need is to be able to move a caravan over hard flat surfaces, then the A frame types will perform quite adequately. For rough or uneven ground the chassis type will be more effective

4) Safety- Consider a flat surface leading to a downward ramp. On the flat surface either type of mover will move the caravan with safety. But starting down the ramp the weight of the caravan will start to push the mover, and could cause it to skid and loose control. The A frame units are more prone to this problem than chassis units

5) Cost- In general, the A frame types area cheaper than the chassis types, but cost isn't everything, so it is vitally important that you consider the job you will be asking the system to perform.
Thanks - really helpful for clarifying the issues. Can't myself see the point of an A frame mover for us as one of the advantages would be manoeuvring on sites and making space to take the A frame type along with us seems an added hassle. We shall pursue further.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Anna

there are, I think, 3 suppliers for movers which fix to the chassis - Truma, Powrtouch and Reich.

Truma doesn't have a 'soft start' but Powrtouch and Reich do - this enables you to inch the van about to make hitching up simple. Powrtouch has a 5 year guarantee, Reich is 2 years. The motor on the Reich is away from the wheels, so it is a little more out of road spray. We chose the Reich simply as we were mpore impressed with it at the Caravan Show we attended in Birmingham. I don't think there's much between them at the end of the day.

As to draining the battery, we have a 110 battery and we've never had any problems with power, but then we always use sites with electric hookup and we charge the battery and overnight before any trips, but that's mainly to cool the 'fridge.

We have a Bailey Ranger 510/L which is lighter than yours but is too heavy for me and my wife to push with comfort, with our weak backs, especially on wet grass. Our drive is awkard to navigate and we couldn't (even if I were skilled in reversing) use the car to help, so it is invaluable for us and we can then park within an inch of a wall. For us, its the best thing (after the 'van) that we have bought.

Hope this helps.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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We have the Carver (Truma) and used it without draining the 85 amp hour battery as we also have the van battery on charge at home ,on tow and on site.We now have a 110 amp hour battery but notice no difference as we use it.No doubt if we used no hook up we would see an advantage.

If I was purchasing again I would go for the Truma with its soft start,five year warranty,home fitting and possibilty of factory recon/demmo units (according to postings on websites)

I have reservations about the Reich as it sticks out further and seems lower thatn the other two makes.

I have met one couple whose Reich had contacted the kerb and puctured the tyre and read of another who had similar kerb contact that wrecked the mover
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Anna, probably shouldn't say this on this forum (!), but the current issue of Caravan magazine has an article on movers this month, including the fitting of one. I don't have one as yet, but I imagine the time will come! I have never met anyone who does not regret having one fitted.

Gary
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Anna - we bought a Mr Shifta as our driveway is only 7'9" wide, and our van is 7'3", so precision reversing is essential to get the van in & out, which can't be done with the car as the road is too narrow. Our van is also 1300kg, and the driveway is on a very slight incline. The Mr Shifta works fine on the tarmac surfaces, but wouldn't cope on wet grass etc, for the reasons John says. Look at the classifieds in PC and the CC mag, there's normally loads for sale 2nd hand for about
 
Apr 11, 2005
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I had a mover fitted to caravan. it has worket well. At one site i use it for ten mins. It seemed to still have a lot of power it the batty. I got inflaterbull jocky wheel for caravan the over wheel seemed to dig in to the gravl on sits and put stran on the a frame. It work a lo0t deter with it on.

I woood not be with out the mover now days.

good look mark
 
May 25, 2005
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Hi Anna, We have now had two c'vans with motor movers installed. The first was a Truma and now we have a Powrtouch. They both drive the caravan wheels, but where the Truma has only a one year guarantee with no cover for worn out rollers - the Powrtouch come with a 'no quibble' 5 year guarantee that even covers the rollers. We don't have any problems with the battery although I would suggest you install a heavy duty leisure one.

We initially had a test drive of the motor mover that is powered by its own battery and is fitted to the jockey wheel bearing. This proved useless as the weight and slope ratio stripped the rubber off the wheel completely. And we nearly lost the van down a 3' drop whilst the salesman tried to stop it.

Hope this helps.
 
Jan 19, 2008
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I have had a Carver/Truma mover fitted from the first time I bought a caravan due to the slope on my drive with a wall next to it. The road outside my bungalow also slopes so it would be nigh on impossible to reverse the van onto my drive. With the mover it is easy but best of all I can park it nose first making it more difficult for thieves because theres no way they could push it up the drive. It as never drained my battery and makes hitching up so easy. I have tried to think of anything negative about them but I can't so go for it Anna, you won't be disappointed.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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beleive me the chassis type(powrtouch is the one i chose) is a must,as have said on other threads if you can afford it, buy it, you will not regret it, they are absolutely brilliant. battery drain will only occur with very very excessive use,something you will probably never encounter.
 
Aug 6, 2005
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Hi i am looking also for a mover i am only considering the chasis type and was wondering which make would be best to go for, a friend who we know recommended the powrtouch one and i think the general feling on this thread is powrtouch also, i have rang and asked them to send me the literiture though the post, so when it arrives i can read though and hopefully order one, i was told to get the one with the extra powerful motor and as it is quite bumpy at my storgae compound thought this would be a good idea, i am also hoping to get the van at home down a narrow ten foot passage with a tight turn, if anyone has any input to this and how good or not so good it is please let me know.

Thanks
 
Mar 14, 2005
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i can only say, ive got a powrtouch mover and im extremely happy with what ive bought,i also opted for the heavy duty model, as that is what i was recommended for my van.like many other powrtouch mover owners, i have not heard anyone as yet, have any serious problems with their mover.and if a fault should arise, by the sounds of what little has arisen has been rectified immediately by the company.the choice is yours
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hi All,

Does anyone have experiance of the Rhyno Caravan Mover? They are a chassiss type unit and they seem to be a lot cheaper than the Powertouch etc. I am just wondering if they as good
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Agree with the other satisfied Powrtouch users. Go for the heavy duty one if your van is above 1200Kg. Make sure the battery connections are really good if a DIY job - the quick release type may or may not provide good low resistance contact - me i prefer two good sized bolts. Despite the instructions, i mounted my control unit vertically - i.e. on the inside wall of the van, as the locker also contains water pipes and any loose connection could flood the control unit.

I've had a couple of minor problems - my own fault - and powrwheel have been excellent with the required bits arriving first class post next day and free.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hi All,

Does anyone have experiance of the Rhyno Caravan Mover? They are a chassiss type unit and they seem to be a lot cheaper than the Powertouch etc. I am just wondering if they as good
After looking at the Rhyno web site my first comments would be that yes it may be cheaper than the others but it looks it as well. I personaly would need to hear a few report before I would shell out any cash on one
 

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