Caravan Security

Oct 3, 2013
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Coming home from holiday discovered the door lock barrel had come out and was lost.Could still lock/unlock the door.The dealer ordered and received a new barrel (to match the key number) and this was fitted in 5 seconds.If it takes 5 seconds to fit how long do you think it would take to overcome the lock and enter the caravan.
 
Aug 4, 2005
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Locks only deter honest people. Caravan doors and windows are pretty flimsy in general, someone who knew what they were doing could probably be inside most vans in a couple of seconds. Not an experienced burglar myself ( not even an inexperienced one) but I reckon it wouldn’t take me long to break into a caravan.
 
May 7, 2012
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I agree that the security on caravans is not good. The door has an aluminium frame which can easily be overcome so the lock is probably irrelevant. The windows are also pretty flimsy and no problem to anyone wanting to get in but anything reasonably secure would be too heavy so what we have is at best a compromise.
There are additional security items you can add to the door but at the end of the day you have to live with the risk.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Ironic too that the new generation vans are fitted with fancy locks for which you cannot buy just a new key - and dealer prices are extortionate.
Can't even get these keys cut in America (from where they originate) as I've tried only to find that the appropriate blanks are supplied only to the appropriate caravan makers.

All this would be pretty secure apart from the relatively flimsy frames and the fact that the hinge pins are easily accessible. Advent of battery powered portable angle grinders does not help either.
 
Oct 12, 2013
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bertieboy1 said:
Coming home from holiday discovered the door lock barrel had come out and was lost.Could still lock/unlock the door.The dealer ordered and received a new barrel (to match the key number) and this was fitted in 5 seconds.If it takes 5 seconds to fit how long do you think it would take to overcome the lock and enter the caravan.

You've jinxed me again this forum ! when ours went in for a service a few months ago , we asked him to have a look at the lock as it wad stiff , it just looked like they'd put WD4o in to it !
Anyway this morning was washing it plan was to take it back to the storage but not now) gone to get into it and the barrell has snapped and come out with my key ! :( sick as you can imagine .
I've managed to put it back in and lock it securely but waiting for the garage to open now. :angry:
 
Jun 26, 2017
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Hi Craig,

Save yourself a trip to the garage ...

The locks do need lubricating periodically, or it becomes difficult to insert and retract the key, meaning that you end up using excessive force and potentially inadvertently removing or damaging the lock.

As with all mechanical components, there are different schools of thought as to what type of lubricant to use, be it oil, silicon or petroleum (WD-40) based. Either way, if you just apply plenty of your preferred substance to the key and then push the key in an out a few times and lock and unlock the door it will make a world of difference. Also, if there has been a lot of friction within the pins, you may well find that the front disc face of the lock has become distorted and is no longer flat. This will also prevent the protective flap from returning to its protective position when you retract the key. A little gentle teasing with a small flat blade screwdriver should rectify this.

I Lubricate all the locks periodically, on the front locker, and the access doors to keep them in great condition.

Let us know how you get on ...

Edit: Are you sure the barrel has actually snapped ? - By design, if the key is inserted and the whole lock housing is rotated sufficiently, the barrel can be completely removed. This is normal and is no cause for concern. If you’ve now put the barrel back in, try lubricating and let us know how you get on.
 
Oct 12, 2013
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Yes it has snapped as when I've took the key out it's come out with the key & little metal bits are still in the hole !
I've managed to put it back in and secure it and its not a stiff lock , its a broken one . The garage is on route to my storage facility anyway so it's not out of my way .
 

Damian

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Mar 14, 2005
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Quote " there are different schools of thought as to what type of lubricant to use, be it oil, silicon or petroleum (WD-40) based"

I do wish people would stop referring to WD40 as a lubricant, it is NOT.(despite what the maker claims)

Secondly It should never come anywhere near a Hartal lock, unless you want to have problems.

None of the liquid lubricants are good for locks, the only safe lubricant is graphite powder.
 
Jun 26, 2017
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Damian,

Any substance used to reduce the friction between two mating surfaces is acting as a lubricant. Whilst WD-40 is certainly not my first choice (I much prefer to use it as a cleaner), it does have lubricating properties, although not very long lasting.
 
Jun 26, 2017
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I once had a similar issue to Craig’s with my van door lock whilst on site. It had become increasingly difficult to insert and retract the key since the van was new, but on this particular occasion, it was almost impossible. The lubrication provided by a quick squirt of WD-40 (being the only thing available at the time) onto the key made it work as smooth as silk in seconds. I now lubricate all the locks periodically with GT-85 (silicon based) and they work perfectly and smoothly.
 
May 7, 2012
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I have found the front locker locks get stiff and used a light oil on them with the locker open so that the oil can run down into the lock.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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Damian-Moderator said:
Quote " there are different schools of thought as to what type of lubricant to use, be it oil, silicon or petroleum (WD-40) based"

I do wish people would stop referring to WD40 as a lubricant, it is NOT.(despite what the maker claims)

Secondly It should never come anywhere near a Hartal lock, unless you want to have problems.

None of the liquid lubricants are good for locks, the only safe lubricant is graphite powder.

WD40 has gained a reputation way beyond for what it is useful for.

As Damain said, it is not a lubricant, it is a water dispersal fluid, in saying that, it does and will have 'temporary' lubrication attributes.

I use WD40 quite a lot, but I avoid it like heartburn as a lubricant or electrical contact cleaner etc., for what it is it is very good, but it is not a 'cure all'.

As a general use product it causes more grief than it is worth (it penetrateslubricates for a very short period oft time and then dries out, in drying out it usually exacerbates all of the problems that existed before it was originally applied.

WD40 has become so accepted as a panacea for all situations,so much so that I know that my comments will not at all be readily accepted.

WD40 has it's uses , used inappropriately it is a liability.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Spent a whole two weeks in France with our door lock broken. Door held in place whilst travelling with duct tape.
First introduced to WD40 when one evening travelling down the A48 towards Chepstow in heavy rain a lorry drenched my minivan and the engine came to a halt. I lifted the bonnet and was about to take the distributor apart and dry the plugs and coil. Just the a policeman stopped his car and came across. Oh damn just what I needed a document check etc. However he had a can in his hand which he directed at my engine. Crikey I thought it needs more liquid like a hole in the head. Anyway he then told me to give it a whirl on the starter. Amazing she fired up almost instantly. Since then it’s always been in my toolbox. I’ve even seen it sprayed using large pressure sprays for aircraft as they arrive back on ship. At times they would be dripping WD40. Guess environmental awareness makes such an approach a bit off script.
 
May 7, 2012
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Those of us who had early minis were well aware of WD40 and a similar product from Holts as the distributor cap was just behind the grill and damp was a constant problem.
 
Oct 12, 2013
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Locks totally gone , new one but only temporary fixed until full new set has been ordered . Swift unfortunately are on holiday shut down at the minute !!
 
Sep 4, 2017
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WD-40 is the trademark name of a penetrating oil and water-displacing spray. The spray is manufactured by the WD-40 Company based in San Diego, California. Wikipedia
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Grey13 said:
WD-40 is the trademark name of a penetrating oil and water-displacing spray. The spray is manufactured by the WD-40 Company based in San Diego, California. Wikipedia

They also make a range of other products too, all under the WD40 label. One earlier competitor was DWF. But I think Displace Water Fast has probably disappeared from the market place now.

Edit PS you can still buy DWF under the Castro’s label
https://www.castrol.com/en_au/australia/products/other-products/garden/dwf-multipurpose.html
 
Mar 14, 2005
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As with so many things in life, there's no such thing as a universal product, so it "horses for courses" WD40 has its place on the shelf.
 
May 24, 2014
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Craig, you werent by any chance at Lowdham Huddersfield a few days back. I was talking to a couple there who had a lock barrel stuck to their key, not amused at all was the gentleman.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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Craigyoung said:
Never using it again ! Gonna buy some decent lubricant

Craig,

It's not a panacea for everything but has many properties that some WD40 users expect of WD40.

It was not designed as a water dispersal agent or a lubricant but it has many attributes, worth checking out, not cheap but so very very versatile.

http://www.acf-50.co.uk/acf-50.htm
EDIT: try it on locks and electrical contacts etc. you will not be disappointed.
A half litre (goes a very very long way-years perhaps) including applicator can be had for £30.00, seems a lot, but worth every penny,
reliable protection for a relatevely small initital outlay.
 

Damian

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Mar 14, 2005
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Taken from a well respected website which listed 15 things WD 40 is good for, like spraying on shovels etc and these things it should not be:

But Don't Spray It On:
1. Door hinges. Sure, WD-40 will stop the squeaking, but it also attracts dust and dirt. Over time, you'll end up with ugly black streaks on your hinges.
2. Bike chains. WD-40 can cause dirt and dust to stick to a chain. Use bike-specific lubricants, which typically contain Teflon.
3. Paintball guns. WD-40 can melt the seals in the guns.
4. Locks. The spray can prematurely wear down the internal mechanisms, especially in the pin tumbler locks, in door locks and padlocks. Go for graphite powder.
5. iPods and iPads. WD-40 won't repair the Home button on these devices. In fact, the spray can cause the plastic to break down on the cover, and if some gets inside the electronics, it can damage plastic parts inside.
 
Jul 15, 2008
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I have a 23 year old Swift caravan owned from new. The original locks have had regular doses of WD40 and work beautifully :whistle:
Guess I've been doing it all wrong!
 

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