Cost to buyer returning van to retailer

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Jun 16, 2020
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I could well be wrong, it’s not something I have studied. But clearly (to me), the crew cabs etc vehicle type would be a grey area. But I understand that it is lorries that are the problem as the suspension is so hard it can send damaging shock waves through the caravan chassis and body. Yes, commercial towers use lorries. How common it is I don’t know, but I am told they should have a special hitch which absorbs the shocks.

But bare in mind, all the above might be in my imagianation.

😁

John
 
Nov 11, 2009
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My uncle towed a caravan all over UK and into Europe with a 110 Land Rover Defender station wagon. It’s suspension was identical to the County version and was hard enough to dislodge tooth fillings. Can’t ever recall him saying his Caravan ever had a problem with its chassis. Damp yes but not chassis and he seemed to have the one van for many years.
 
May 7, 2012
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The problem from my limited experience of the claims is with the longer twin axle models where the stress actor from the harder suspension is the problem. One caravan engineer did say he was aware of even the Hobby caravans used by travelers having chassis problems due to the harder suspension on the Transits they tend to use. The smaller pick ups do not seem to be a problem in practice, but firms looking at the guarantee condition could still use it as they have a load bed and are basically commercial vehicles.
Basically the exclusion is in the guarantee, you know it is there so you are taking a risk, albeit I think a very small one.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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The problem from my limited experience of the claims is with the longer twin axle models where the stress actor from the harder suspension is the problem. One caravan engineer did say he was aware of even the Hobby caravans used by travelers having chassis problems due to the harder suspension on the Transits they tend to use. The smaller pick ups do not seem to be a problem in practice, but firms looking at the guarantee condition could still use it as they have a load bed and are basically commercial vehicles.
Basically the exclusion is in the guarantee, you know it is there so you are taking a risk, albeit I think a very small one.
Why wouldn’t the questioner ask the maker for clarification?
 
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Mar 14, 2005
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My uncle towed a caravan all over UK and into Europe with a 110 Land Rover Defender station wagon. It’s suspension was identical to the County version and was hard enough to dislodge tooth fillings. Can’t ever recall him saying his Caravan ever had a problem with its chassis. Damp yes but not chassis and he seemed to have the one van for many years.
Perhaps the harder vibrations broke down the joint mastic which caused the damp problems?
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Perhaps the harder vibrations broke down the joint mastic which caused the damp problems?
I could accept that on a Caravan and car of that vintage. How do we explain today’s damp problems when cars have better suspension and caravan makers have had 30-40 years to learn? Just a thought. 🤭
 
May 7, 2012
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Frankly the newer models are not built as well as the older ones. Having had eight caravans I do accept the current ones do no stend comparison with older ones.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Strange how many Baileys Swifts etc I see being towed by a large transporter with one on
the wagon.🤪🤪. And you pay for the delivery😥 Is that the start of latent damage🤔🤔
 

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