Drilling glass in double glazed units???

Jul 30, 2007
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Hi.
Our conservatory has 7 X 3ftx4ft double glazed windows but unfortunatly,5 are now showing signs of condensation between the glass.
Weve had conservatory for over 20 years now so we have'nt done bad.
I do realise that probably the seals are gone so new replacements are in order but just wondering if any members here have tried gently drilling one of the panes of glass and inserting small rubber bungs (as caravan windows have) to be able to use a hair dryer from time to time to dry them out.
I realise this may only be a temporary fix and at sometime in the future new window units will be required.
Ive seen a few videos on You Tube and the results look quite impressive but wondering if anyone has actually tried it.
Ade.
 

JB1

Aug 4, 2022
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Check the glazed units you want to drill are not toughened if so you can’t drill, also bear in mind the glass is old so might break any way when you drill. You use a spade drill bit an water for cooling practice on a thin bottle or old bit of glass first. Good luck and safety gear.
 
Jul 30, 2007
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Many thanks JB1
No,the glass isnt toughend but...
I didnt take into account on the age of the glass....good advice.
Thanks again.
Ade
 
Jun 16, 2020
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The glass will almost certainly be toughened. Just look for the writing in one corner. Sounds like a hell of a lot of work for little or no gain to me.

My conservatory and most of my double glazing are well over 20 years old and have done really well. I have had to renew a couple of sections in the conservatory due to ‘blowing’. I was also going to put new panels in a bedroom, but the glazier said he could do a new frame for very little extra,

Over the last couple of years, I have had all my older windows and the conservatory panels replaced. This gave me the advantage of using modern ‘K’ glass, with a larger cavity and gas-filled. A job well done.

I also purchased a large tup of gasket (£70). And replaced the seals in all opening windows and doors. A time consuming job, but it did make a difference.

I think it was about £2,500. Not too sure, but I will check my files and add it to this post later.

John
 
Jul 30, 2007
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Although you say "A hell of a lot of work for little or no gain"....for people like ourselves with a limited budget,I thought my idea would "Tide us over"for a few more years.
Not lucky enough to spend a great deal like others.
All glazing units show no signs of having a toughened stamp.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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Although you say "A hell of a lot of work for little or no gain"....for people like ourselves with a limited budget,I thought my idea would "Tide us over"for a few more years.
Not lucky enough to spend a great deal like others.
All glazing units show no signs of having a toughened stamp.

I understand your logic but still think that it is a lot of work for little or no gain. Is your conservatory a habitable room?

In only my opinion, your suggestion would not be cost-effective.

If you have a limited budget, you would surely not wish to waste it.

How are you convinced that your units are standard glass? You say 20 years old, but toughened glass has been a legal requirement since 1996.

Since 1996, Regulation 14 of the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 has made the requirement for safety glazing in accordance with BS 6262 mandatory and retrospective.

(But that may not relate to smaller panels, so it is possible that your units escaped the legislation, so therefore could be standard glass).

My budget is also limited. I felt I spent wisely. But would have put up with the blowing if I could not have managed it.

In view of your comments, I will not hunt out the receipts.

John
 
Mar 14, 2005
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jondogoescaravanning.com
About two years ago one of my kitchen windows began to get condensation within the unit. Also my uPVC front door panel so I measured up the size I would need and ordered new units online. I used THIS company for replacement units. Give them sufficient notice and delivery charge can be free. Responsibility for correct measurements and fitting is down to the owner.
 
Nov 6, 2005
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Two of our windows have panels with condensation in - the only answer is replacement of the panels or complete windows - we don't have the budget for that at present but it's no hardship to live with it until we do - the benefits of double glazing are still there, even if reduced a little.
 
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Mar 14, 2005
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As RogerL has pointed out even if the double glazed unit have started misting, they are still going to be better ( from a thermal perspective) than on that been deliberately drilled and breached.

I also believe considering the age of the units, that they will be toughened or laminated units, so if you do attempt to drill them there is a great risk they will shatter.

On balance I'd suggest leaving well alone and save your pennies until they can be replaced.
 

JB1

Aug 4, 2022
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There is a company called something like cloudy to clear and they drill double glazed units use a cleaning fluid to clean the void to stop the unit being cloudy. Look them up on the net.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Ade, your thoughts are sound. Blown DG units mean the artificial vacuum between the two glazed panels has failed. Rather than drilling the glass , disaster imo , why not remove each panel and drill breather holes through the sealed ally type sides , ie between the panels of glass. It may or may not work but safer than drilling the glass
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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Drilling the glass though will not address the issue causing the misting, that is the edge seals, glass to glass, have failed so they breathe in moisture carrying air.
It will not be through the glass where the porosity is, that will be in the edges somewhere and possibly multiple places.
Remove them and resealing is necessary. With a need to pick a very low humidity warm day, presently challenging!
 
Nov 16, 2015
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There is a company called something like cloudy to clear and they drill double glazed units use a cleaning fluid to clean the void to stop the unit being cloudy. Look them up on the net.
Hi. JB1 I have used them, to replace my old (20 years) misted up DG windows, I told them that the windows were Kapafloat, they said I doubt it, but when they measured with their magic tool, apologised.
Good company and a good price.
 
Jul 30, 2007
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Thank you for all your valued replies.
Only reason I thought of drilling 2 holes in the glass,using a hairdryer to dry them out temporarily like caravan windows seemed like a good idea.....maybe not.
JTQ.....I did realise the cause of the misting/condensation is down to the seals on the edges.
Dustydog....good idea about the breather holes.
After all your advice....think I will leave well alone for the time being until funds allow us to replace the glazing units.
(Must do the lottery tonight) 👍
 

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