Glue that is not glue?

Jul 18, 2017
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I want to stick to items together so that they will stay stuck to one another for a long time, but when it comes to separate the items it is not a hard job i.e. a Veneer / Formica does not lift and a good rub removes glue residue. Thanks.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hi Buckman, it will depend on what the two things being stuck together are made of.
And further:
What shape are the objects, how much surface area will be stuck, will it need to resist water, and or heat (how hot) Will it need to resist sunlight and what type of forces will it need to resist.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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It is to stick down a washbasin to a surface with Formica on top. The washbasin is more or less flat undernath and the glue would be there to stop it turning, but may have to be removed if at some point it requires a repair, modification etc. We have a washbasin that has very steep sides and is narrow making it difficult for me to wash my face etc. The new basin is wider and the sides lower and it is easier for me to access. If at some point in the future we need to sell the caravan, the original basin will need to be fitted and then Formica surface is exposed so any traces fo glue will need to be removed.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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In that case definitely be silicone. Does all you ask and seals it water tight to boot. Doesn’t the new basin have some sort of hold down from underneath?

John
 
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Jan 31, 2018
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Absolutely, bathroom silicone, clear or White to suit. Great stuff re moves with a knife or scraper and patience and you can buy silicone remover too if needs be but you can usually scrape it off Formica.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Go gently and thin on the silicon. Be sure you can cut around the joint and use silicone remover to clean up all surfaces.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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I would be using Copydex a natural latex, not a silicone.
The latex will serve well to stop water ingress, can be readily cut off with dental floss "cheese-wire" with zero damage risk and peels readily with just finger rubbing. It is aslo less prone to mildew.
 
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Jun 16, 2020
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I would be using Copydex a natural latex, not a silicone.
The latex will serve well to stop water ingress, can be readily cut off with dental floss "cheese-wire" with zero damage risk and peels readily with just finger rubbing. It is aslo less prone to mild dew.
You really don't want to get a mild dew on anything. :ROFLMAO:

Often these plastic sinks have a rounded edge profile ending in a small contact area. Literally bedding it in silicone gives a complete seal, overspill is easily cleaned off impervious surfaces.


John
 
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JTQ

May 7, 2005
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If all you require from the "glue" is to stop that turning is there not an alternative concept to glueing?
What about a tailored wood batten slipped behind it and against the side/back board, basically just an anti turn "key"?
A discrete short bit fixed on some mirror tape.

Or even plonk the basin down on a couple of strips of mirror tape; I fixed a mirror to the wall of our van back in 2008 with that brand of tape and it's still there 35,000 miles plus later.
 
Jul 18, 2017
1,488
228
5,435
If all you require from the "glue" is to stop that turning is there not an alternative concept to glueing?
What about a tailored wood batten slipped behind it and against the side/back board, basically just an anti turn "key"?
A discrete short bit fixed on some mirror tape.

Or even plonk the basin down on a couple of strips of mirror tape; I fixed a mirror to the wall of our van back in 2008 with that brand of tape and it's still there 35,000 miles plus later.
Thanks for the hint. Hopefully the basin will arrive today so I can really suss it out.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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On reflection, I would design for venting under the bowl rather than attempting to "seal" it down, particularly with a silicone on a work top surface in an application that by thats very nature will be bouncing about during towing. With a used worktop there could well be traces of polish, soaps etc that could act as release agents to any bond, if leaving the surface untreated so suitable for retrospective use.
 

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