Feb 13, 2022
553
407
1,135
Visit site
Nice handy bit of kit. I thought I would invest in one after water in socket shenanigans. At least then I can test it prior to a trip to ensure no issues. It's a bit pricy at £39.99 for what it is, a bit of plastic with some LEDs mounted and connected to a trailer lead, but never mind. I can envisage how I would knock my own up, but don't really have that much time on my hands to muck around with. There are cheaper ones, but I think the ones without a lead are a bit naff as they still require a second person, whereas I can just sit in the car and watch it "live". Worth the money I feel compared to the potential inconvenience of not having one if ever I have problems. Obviously I will still check lights on back of caravan every time I hitch up!

Happily, I can confirm that all my pins are working correctly.
 
Feb 13, 2022
553
407
1,135
Visit site
Sorry, Chris, I think you have wasted your money. Plug the caravan in and just check your lights.

Well each to their own. But having had water ingress issues already, I'd prefer to be able to check the electrics are working properly without necessarily having to drive to the storage yard, especially if I get more issues. I don't want to wait until the day I am going away to discover the electrics are not working correctly.
 
Nov 16, 2015
10,930
3,220
40,935
Visit site
I suppose thats fair enough, once you get used to your towbar electrics and are confident in them, you might put the tester in the box in the back of the car, marked "Caravan Bits".

Mines full of 2 x7 pin to 13 pin adaptors, and visa vera. Spare plugs etc.
Good luck for this weekend.
 
Mar 14, 2005
17,932
3,298
50,935
Visit site
Sorry, Chris, I think you have wasted your money. Plug the caravan in and just check your lights.
For some people it might be a waste of money, but it could pay for itself if it avoids having to go to a professional fitter to diagnose the problem who might well charge £40+ per hour.

If nothing else it can help to eliminate the car or the trailer as the location of a fault, and it can be done single handedly.

A couple of years back I had a problem with the heater vents inside the dashboard of a car, where the flap that diverted the cabin air through the AC unit was not actuating. I knew exactly what it was and how it should be fixed, but I was not personally prepared to do it as it needed the entire dashboard stripping out to access the components. I approached a company and asked them to quote to do the work, but I baulked when they told me there was a £50 charge just to connect it to a diagnostic ODB reader, and they wouldn't touch the job without doing that. Needless to say they didn't get the job.
 
Jul 8, 2020
412
146
4,735
Visit site
I have been towing since passing my test as a teenager and i would say from my experience 99% off light issues are from the trailers/Caravans etc not the towing vehicle.

But every one likes a gadget and if it does save time and effort why not eh (y)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bluetonic

JTQ

May 7, 2005
3,400
1,216
20,935
Visit site
Sorry, Chris, I think you have wasted your money. Plug the caravan in and just check your lights.

Plus, that technique checks not only the functioning of the towbar's electrics but also the caravan's and with it the bulbs, though potentially denies adding to the clobber this hobby seems to gather.;)
"I have to confess to liking gadgets". Chris, here, with caravanning your opportunities will be boundless!

If there is a history of towbar electrics issues and the van is not there, it is understandable, but in that position, I could as easily use the trailer board, more a multipurpose bit of clobber we do have. Though again only testing the car.
 
Last edited:

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts