No milk or meat

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Mel

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Did you know that we can no longer take personal supplies of milk, milk products or meat across an EU border. So no more filling the fridge ready for a cuppa and a sarnie on arrival.
mel
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Yes on a previous post I mentioned it saying you will be okay with a Mars Bar and a bottle big Evian. Then on arrival find an Auchan, and don’t forget the dogs Canigou as it’s doubtful you will be able to take even their dried food either.
It could make a big difference to the supplies that caravanners take over with them. The positive is that the payload benefits. It’s neither certain what we can bring back here. My saucisson sec and cassoulet may be banned without a health certificate. But Cornwall should still be “ border free”

Our continental trips will end until the dogs are no longer with us, then back to hotels and BB.
 
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From Europa.eu

Rules when travelling from a non-EU country
If you travel to the EU from a non-EU country, you are not allowed to bring any meat or dairy products with you. You can however bring a limited quantity of fruit and vegetables as well as eggs, egg products and honey. Restricted quantities of fish or fish products are also allowed.

ProductAmount per personAdditional restrictions
Eviscerated fresh fishery products, or prepared or processed fishery products20 kg or 1 fish (whichever weighs most)
Fishery products from the Faroe Islands or Greenland
Goods, other than plants for planting and other than fishery products, coming from the Faroe Islands or Greenland Their combined quantity does not exceed the weight limit of 10 kg
Plants or plant products including cut flowers A phytosanitary (plant health) certificate is required attesting that the product is free from certain specific pests
Powdered infant milk, infant food and special foods required for medical reasonsNo more than 2 kg
  • do not require refrigeration before opening
  • are packaged proprietary brand products for direct sale to the final consumer
  • that the packaging is unbroken unless in current use
Pet food required for health-related reasonsNo more than 2 kg
  • are intended for the pet accompanying the passenger
  • are shelf-stable (do not require refrigeration)
  • are packaged proprietary brand products for direct sale to the final consumer
  • that the packaging is unbroken unless in current use
Products other than those described above which do not contain meat or milk (e.g. honey)2kgNone
Checks when entering the EU
When arriving in the EU you may have to undergo official controls by the authorities. If you are carrying any meat or dairy products, which you have not declared they will be confiscated and destroyed, you may also be fined or face criminal prosecution.

Other animal derived products and plants

You may carry animal derived products - when you are travelling in the EU. However, most EU countries have strict rules on carrying endangered animals or plants or products derived from them, and in some cases, you may need a permit. For example, you may only carry 125g of sturgeon caviar; you will need a permit if you can more than this amount.

To find out about a specific species, you should always check the EU wildlife trade reference database. You can also contact the CITES authority in your country to find out if the species you want to travel with needs a permit.

*******************

Seems petty to me for personal use. Also, I wonder if it is at all workable in the height of the season.

John
 
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Apr 2, 2020
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Did you know that we can no longer take personal supplies of milk, milk products or meat across an EU border. So no more filling the fridge ready for a cuppa and a sarnie on arrival.
mel
It would be good to know when we are able to travel to Europe again. We are totally fed up of Lockdown here in the UK
 
Apr 2, 2020
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From Europa.eu

Rules when travelling from a non-EU country
If you travel to the EU from a non-EU country, you are not allowed to bring any meat or dairy products with you. You can however bring a limited quantity of fruit and vegetables as well as eggs, egg products and honey. Restricted quantities of fish or fish products are also allowed.

ProductAmount per personAdditional restrictions
Eviscerated fresh fishery products, or prepared or processed fishery products20 kg or 1 fish (whichever weighs most)
Fishery products from the Faroe Islands or Greenland
Goods, other than plants for planting and other than fishery products, coming from the Faroe Islands or GreenlandTheir combined quantity does not exceed the weight limit of 10 kg
Plants or plant products including cut flowersA phytosanitary (plant health) certificate is required attesting that the product is free from certain specific pests
Powdered infant milk, infant food and special foods required for medical reasonsNo more than 2 kg
  • do not require refrigeration before opening
  • are packaged proprietary brand products for direct sale to the final consumer
  • that the packaging is unbroken unless in current use
Pet food required for health-related reasonsNo more than 2 kg
  • are intended for the pet accompanying the passenger
  • are shelf-stable (do not require refrigeration)
  • are packaged proprietary brand products for direct sale to the final consumer
  • that the packaging is unbroken unless in current use
Products other than those described above which do not contain meat or milk (e.g. honey)2kgNone
Checks when entering the EU
When arriving in the EU you may have to undergo official controls by the authorities. If you are carrying any meat or dairy products, which you have not declared they will be confiscated and destroyed, you may also be fined or face criminal prosecution.

Other animal derived products and plants

You may carry animal derived products - when you are travelling in the EU. However, most EU countries have strict rules on carrying endangered animals or plants or products derived from them, and in some cases, you may need a permit. For example, you may only carry 125g of sturgeon caviar; you will need a permit if you can more than this amount.

To find out about a specific species, you should always check the EU wildlife trade reference database. You can also contact the CITES authority in your country to find out if the species you want to travel with needs a permit.

*******************

Seems petty to me for personal use. Also, I wonder if it is at all workable in the height of the season.

John
Thank you for the updated information. Very helpful
 
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Petty or not, they are the rules that UK have been applying as part of our membership of the EU to others entering from non EU countries, so we really cannot complain. Although knowing us they were not probably very well enforced.

Other countries have similar rules. Flying to the US the entry forms, ask if you have been on a farm within seven days. I used to say “ no” despite having a small hobby outfit. Fruit, meat etc banned. In Australia there are very strict limits on what can be taken between states and airports have hoppers to bin your illicit apples (pommes) 😂

At least the dogs can have 2 kg for their personal use. On one trip we took 2x15 kg sacks of dried dog food, so as not to risk running out. We can eat “ foreign” but not the girls 😂
 
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It would be good to know when we are able to travel to Europe again. We are totally fed up of Lockdown here in the UK

My daughters ex has been working in the Netherlands but had to come back to UK at Christmas cannot go back as work permits aren’t available. He was earning €8000 a month installing telecoms for a Czech company supplying U.K. specialists into the Netherlands. Fortunately he’s still got his HGV licence for large artics which may give him a fall back if UK telecoms work isn’t available.
 
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I wonder if you would get away with something like Coffeemate?

Interesting question. But it might be hard to convince anyone it’s infant food. The post above does seem to prohibit “dairy” except for limited exceptions. But don’t try Peri Peri sauce. One was confiscated going from Gibraltar into Spain. The Spanish worker had taken it in with him as part of his lunch and was returning home into Spain. But that was probably just a bit of over zealousness by the border staff. Just stick to Mars Bar and Evian, but not Dairy Milk 🙈
 
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The rules might be inhibitive, but many countries have had some already in place. Switzerland have had a maximum meat allowance of 1 kg per person for years. We would go across to Germany for Meat twice a week.
 
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Petty or not, they are the rules that UK have been applying as part of our membership of the EU to others entering from non EU countries, so we really cannot complain. Although knowing us they were not probably very well enforced.

Other countries have similar rules. Flying to the US the entry forms, ask if you have been on a farm within seven days. I used to say “ no” despite having a small hobby outfit. Fruit, meat etc banned. In Australia there are very strict limits on what can be taken between states and airports have hoppers to bin your illicit apples (pommes) 😂

At least the dogs can have 2 kg for their personal use. On one trip we took 2x15 kg sacks of dried dog food, so as not to risk running out. We can eat “ foreign” but not the girls 😂

I thought ‘petty’ because it’s not long haul and benefits work both ways for holiday industries either side. In my experience, my observations are, that UK enforcement exceeds that of other EU countries.

I understand the reference to people traveling from outside the EU (as was). But haven’t we ‘negotiated’ reciprocal agreements. Is this something that has been, overlooked, ignored or rejected.

I understand the likes of Australia who try to prevent contamination entering their systems. But I remember the honesty bin 30 meters from the side of the road between states and in the middle of nowhere, nowhere to park and cars flying past. I don’t recall them at airports on internal flights. But perhaps I didn’t look.

Pet food allowance is only for health related reasons.

John
 
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Personally think there is a fair amount of press hype going on here and seeing is believing but tbh getting out of the EU has far more advantages than the disadvantages. If I go to Europe I won't take meat or milk but buy there and enjoy their wonderful produce as I enjoy ours.
 
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Nov 11, 2009
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I thought ‘petty’ because it’s not long haul and benefits work both ways for holiday industries either side. In my experience, my observations are, that UK enforcement exceeds that of other EU countries.

I understand the reference to people traveling from outside the EU (as was). But haven’t we ‘negotiated’ reciprocal agreements. Is this something that has been, overlooked, ignored or rejected.

I understand the likes of Australia who try to prevent contamination entering their systems. But I remember the honesty bin 30 meters from the side of the road between states and in the middle of nowhere, nowhere to park and cars flying past. I don’t recall them at airports on internal flights. But perhaps I didn’t look.

Pet food allowance is only for health related reasons.

John
I would assume that pets having to eat would be for their health, same as infants, but it could be an interesting point of discussion when arriving at the EU border check. I dare say that if uk stays aligned with EU regs and standards further negotiations could ease the restrictions.
 
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It might seem "petty" to you , but these rules were originally introduced in to prevent the spread of endemic dieses across country borders.

We travelled to Canada in 2007 and to help feed the children whilst en-route, we took some foil wrapped processed cheese triangles. We declared them, but we were still grilled about what they were for, They only let us in on the promise we would not visit any farms!

But just as example of how serious such things can get, Just look at how Covid has spread. It only take a few to ignore the rules and in C19's case it seized the opportunity and has caused havoc.

Whilst being able to travel to other countries (When the bans are lifted) may be considered our rite, we also have a responsibility to be considerate, and respect their sensitivities however petty they may seem.
 
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I would assume that pets having to eat would be for their health, same as infants, but it could be an interesting point of discussion when arriving at the EU border check. I dare say that if uk stays aligned with EU regs and standards further negotiations could ease the restrictions.

It could mean a vet specified diet! 😁

John
 
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It might seem "petty" to you , but these rules were originally introduced in to prevent the spread of endemic dieses across country borders.

We travelled to Canada in 2007 and to help feed the children whilst en-route, we took some foil wrapped processed cheese triangles. We declared them, but we were still grilled about what they were for, They only let us in on the promise we would not visit any farms!

But just as example of how serious such things can get, Just look at how Covid has spread. It only take a few to ignore the rules and in C19's case it seized the opportunity and has caused havoc.

Whilst being able to travel to other countries (When the bans are lifted) may be considered our rite, we also have a responsibility to be considerate, and respect their sensitivities however petty they may seem.

I thought petty for the reasons provided in #11. But fully accept and respect the reasoning for countries were no agreement or history of movement exists.

Other than that you have extrapolated far more than the word was intended to mean.

John
 
Jul 18, 2017
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We like our sausage and bacon for breakfast on weekends and we are not keen on most of the French sausage. Could never find bacon in France however no issue in Spain.
Also our dogs are fussy about food so not sure how to handle that one although we have managed in the past. Generally they eat Cesar foods.
 
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Tbh if visiting another country take nothing food wise and enjoy their food. That's my philosophy.

Exactly what we do, well mostly, in the past we have tried to take a supply of decent bacon. That would be taking the Micky from now on. But a small amount for, say breakfast for a couple of days.

John
 
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Mel

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I believe alcohol can still be transported. So will probably be survivable. ;) Assuming we are ever allowed to leave our homes of course.
mel
 
Nov 11, 2009
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We like our sausage and bacon for breakfast on weekends and we are not keen on most of the French sausage. Could never find bacon in France however no issue in Spain.
Also our dogs are fussy about food so not sure how to handle that one although we have managed in the past. Generally they eat Cesar foods.
Canigou is a good french fall back.
 
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I have always found that the Spirits in France and Switzerland have been cheaper than the UK. Our dogs food "Burns " can be found in LeClerc, or go to a vets and find all those specialised dog foods.
But as for real bacon, nothing akin to British bacon, not even Danish.
 
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