Removing glue residue from a window

Oct 4, 2006
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I know that this has been covered before but cannot find the topic. Blue residue from a sticker needs to be removed. Can someone tell me the best way to do this? Many thanks
Roy Horridge
 
Nov 11, 2009
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RoyHorridge said:
I know that this has been covered before but cannot find the topic. Blue residue from a sticker needs to be removed. Can someone tell me the best way to do this? Many thanks
Roy Horridge

I’ve used Sticky Stuff Remover soaked on to a piece of kitchen roll. Then gently keep wiping it until the residue is removed. Then wash the window with warm water and washing up liquid.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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EH52ARH said:
Not keen on WD40 due to the stuff in it, it can melt plastics, try using "Blue Tack

""Just like there are many metals, there are many plastics that are very different from one another. Overall, plastics can be divided into two basic groups:

Crystalline: Polypropylene, Polyethylene, Polyester (all types), Nylon

Amorphous: Polycarbonate, Styrenics (including ABS), PVC

The main ingredient in WD-40 is a light kerosene-like mineral oil, which is hydrocarbon based. Amorphous plastics and hydrocarbons don’t play well together: hydrocarbons will attack the chemical structure of amorphous plastics, breaking them down - essentially trying to “melt” them. In particular, Polycarbonate (PC) and Polystrene (PS). they are two named plastics on the WD-40 “do not use on these” list.

Crystalline materials are unaffected by the hydrocarbons in WD-40, you can spray them as much as you wish.""

The difficulty is knowing which type of plastic you have. :whistle:
 
Feb 23, 2018
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otherclive said:
EH52ARH said:
Not keen on WD40 due to the stuff in it, it can melt plastics, try using "Blue Tack

""Just like there are many metals, there are many plastics that are very different from one another. Overall, plastics can be divided into two basic groups:

Crystalline: Polypropylene, Polyethylene, Polyester (all types), Nylon

Amorphous: Polycarbonate, Styrenics (including ABS), PVC

The main ingredient in WD-40 is a light kerosene-like mineral oil, which is hydrocarbon based. Amorphous plastics and hydrocarbons don’t play well together: hydrocarbons will attack the chemical structure of amorphous plastics, breaking them down - essentially trying to “melt” them. In particular, Polycarbonate (PC) and Polystrene (PS). they are two named plastics on the WD-40 “do not use on these” list.

Crystalline materials are unaffected by the hydrocarbons in WD-40, you can spray them as much as you wish.""

The difficulty is knowing which type of plastic you have. :whistle:

Interesting. With the exception of Airsream, aren't all modern caravan windows made of Acrylic?
 

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