Second Lockdown 😥😥😥😥😥😥😥

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Mel

Mar 17, 2007
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Due my second test later today, my wife got hers yesterday at a different centre. I did ring to see if I could get one moved so we were both there at the same time but they could not manage that. No problems first time round and hoping all goes well today.
It is really easy to get a box of tests for home use. They are also easy ( if a little unpleasant) to do. You then report the results on line. This would save you both going to a centre.
Mel
 
Nov 11, 2009
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This post reminded me that I needed to test today. So I got the box of tests out. In a bitter and unfortunate irony; the tests have “Made in China” clearly printed on the box. 🤔😀
Mel
Well I know someone who will not be putting that one up his nose 😂
 
Mar 14, 2005
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We hear how well the vaccination programme is going and I believe that it has achieved 50% of of the eligible population and that is wonderful, and it has at least allowed a wider range of activities to take place. I have seen many caravans being readied a fair number on the roads.

But C19 is still out there, and there are still people who for one or more reasons have not had a vaccination or developed a immunity, many of those will be fit younger people for whom the risk from covid seems to be less severe, but they are still carrying and can spread the virus.

Even those who have built up an immunity can still have some capacity to spread the virus without necessarily becoming ill themselves.

Until we have reached a much higher level of vaccination in the population or we have found effective ways of identifying and shielding those who remain at high risk, it is still very important to keep social distancing and identifying those who are infected and quarantining.

In that context even with LFT's producing false positives, it is far better to err on the side of safety than to stop doing them. Not only will it help to control the spread of the virus it is building up a very valuable data base which even with the errors provides a lot of useful information to help us better understand patterns of spread, and what factors affect our response to it.

But testing is also still important becasue whilst in the UK we do have an advanced vaccination programme, some other countries do not. and becasue every new person infected introduces some new material to the viruses RNA the potential for significant new more virulent or resistant strains is ever present.

To control any infection you have to break the chain of transmission, which is why vaccination is often a useful tool, but its not as effective as preventing a host spreading the infection in the first place. In a lot of far eastern countries it has become culturally common place to see people on the streets wearing masks. This is actually more about stopping the spread of an infection rather than preventing the wearer catching one.

Covid-19 is now well embedded in the ecosphere of the world, and I think for the foreseeable future mankind will need to use vaccines to minimise infection rates. But just as with influenza the version of the vaccine will need to change to try and keep pace with new variations of the virus over time.

Second best to preventing infection, is the ability to manage it symptoms to render it less dangerous. In teh case of C19, its effects are far wider ranging than the likes of influenza, with multiple organ failures which is one reason it has been such major incident. All health services have have had to apply multiple therapies to help patients and we are still learning about what the virus does to us, and how best to relieve the symptoms.

We are also discovering more about the longer term side effects of the virus. These are also going to impact the cost of providing health care of the long term.

Considering the cost to life and quality of life and the fiscal cost of supporting sufferers, we do need to continue to take all reasonable precautions such as masks to limit the spread, and testing to monitor any spread and to catch it as soon as possible.

PJL
 
Jul 18, 2017
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My wife's niece developed Covid 19 over the weekend and was taken by ambulance to the hospital. She was sent home yesterday and told to stay at home and rest. Her live in boyfriend has taken himself off to the pub to see his mates. No wonder they cannot control the virus.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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We hear how well the vaccination programme is going and I believe that it has achieved 50% of of the eligible population and that is wonderful, and it has at least allowed a wider range of activities to take place. I have seen many caravans being readied a fair number on the roads.

But C19 is still out there, and there are still people who for one or more reasons have not had a vaccination or developed a immunity, many of those will be fit younger people for whom the risk from covid seems to be less severe, but they are still carrying and can spread the virus.

Even those who have built up an immunity can still have some capacity to spread the virus without necessarily becoming ill themselves.

Until we have reached a much higher level of vaccination in the population or we have found effective ways of identifying and shielding those who remain at high risk, it is still very important to keep social distancing and identifying those who are infected and quarantining.

In that context even with LFT's producing false positives, it is far better to err on the side of safety than to stop doing them. Not only will it help to control the spread of the virus it is building up a very valuable data base which even with the errors provides a lot of useful information to help us better understand patterns of spread, and what factors affect our response to it.

But testing is also still important becasue whilst in the UK we do have an advanced vaccination programme, some other countries do not. and becasue every new person infected introduces some new material to the viruses RNA the potential for significant new more virulent or resistant strains is ever present.

To control any infection you have to break the chain of transmission, which is why vaccination is often a useful tool, but its not as effective as preventing a host spreading the infection in the first place. In a lot of far eastern countries it has become culturally common place to see people on the streets wearing masks. This is actually more about stopping the spread of an infection rather than preventing the wearer catching one.

Covid-19 is now well embedded in the ecosphere of the world, and I think for the foreseeable future mankind will need to use vaccines to minimise infection rates. But just as with influenza the version of the vaccine will need to change to try and keep pace with new variations of the virus over time.

Second best to preventing infection, is the ability to manage it symptoms to render it less dangerous. In teh case of C19, its effects are far wider ranging than the likes of influenza, with multiple organ failures which is one reason it has been such major incident. All health services have have had to apply multiple therapies to help patients and we are still learning about what the virus does to us, and how best to relieve the symptoms.

We are also discovering more about the longer term side effects of the virus. These are also going to impact the cost of providing health care of the long term.

Considering the cost to life and quality of life and the fiscal cost of supporting sufferers, we do need to continue to take all reasonable precautions such as masks to limit the spread, and testing to monitor any spread and to catch it as soon as possible.

PJL
Your hypothese is based on the fact that if people test positive on a LFT then they take the correct action which is to isolate, take a PCR and await the result. From the evidence of T&T a large percentage of those who tested positive with a PCR did not in fact self isolate. Same with travellers coming from abroad who were supposed to self isolate. The ONS and Kings University ongoing sampling give a more realistic value to community infection rates as do local NHS and Public Health data. Winding down the T&T at the time that HMG is exhorting us to take two LFT tests a week seems highly illogical to me.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Your hypothese is based on the fact that if people test positive on a LFT then they take the correct action which is to isolate, take a PCR and await the result. From the evidence of T&T a large percentage of those who tested positive with a PCR did not in fact self isolate. Same with travellers coming from abroad who were supposed to self isolate. The ONS and Kings University ongoing sampling give a more realistic value to community infection rates as do local NHS and Public Health data. Winding down the T&T at the time that HMG is exhorting us to take two LFT tests a week seems highly illogical to me.
I quite agree.

I had to go food shopping yesterday, the shop wasn't over busy, but there was a group of four people who obviously knew each other who were all going round the shop with no face masks - well not quite true, one of them had a mask on, but completely under his chin.

The disregard some people have not just for the rules but for the safety of others is alarming. and it is this sort of activity that is likely to undermine the efforts of everyone else.

This is why public health needs to keep testing.

We see the Indian variation as a serious threat, and there will be others around the world. It only takes one person to carry a resilient strain into a vaccinated population, then we could be back to 2020.

The longer there are people who have not received a form of effective inoculation the chances of a more resilient strain arising increases.
PJL
 
Mar 27, 2011
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I’ve had my first jab 11 weeks ago or it will be 11 weeks tomorrow and I’m getting the 2nd jab first thing tomorrow, got back from our 5 night trip to slimbridge today, had fabulous weather, mostly just chilled as it was so nice but managed a few meals at the pub just outside the camp which was great, nice walks and all was great apart from I had a flat battery on the Kuga, and had to get green flag out, he tested the battery and it was passed it’s usable life so a trip to KwikFit and I was £168 lighter, I should have changed it previously as I knew it wasn’t in the best condition as the stop and start hadn’t kicked in for a while, nice to have it back working once the battery was replaced, I had forgotten what a pain it was being on a none serviced pitch and filling and emptying soon lost its appeal, thankfully next 2 trips are both fully serviced, but even with no on pitch services we still had a great time.

BP
 
Jul 18, 2017
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I quite agree.

I had to go food shopping yesterday, the shop wasn't over busy, but there was a group of four people who obviously knew each other who were all going round the shop with no face masks - well not quite true, one of them had a mask on, but completely under his chin.

PJL
I would have thought that the shop would have asked them to leave. Was it one of the main supermarkets?
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Our grandsons partner had an appointment in Bristol yesterday afternoon and caught the train. The guidelines are only to sit near window seats and leave the aisle seats clear. Easier said than done when the train was packed and folks were sitting in aisle seats and standing in the aisles.
She cancelled her appointment and got off in Bath and caught the bus back home. The bus was virtually empty.
So much for social distancing and enclosed spaces. She did say though that the greater majority were wearing masks. Perhaps the trains are being used to test concepts just like Liverpool clubbing and gigs. But without any controls on the test protocols. Forget that hypothesis, just a Hen Down.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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💉🥵🥵🥵Kev must here. First night away N Yorks and wearing heavy duty waterproofs🌨🌨🌧🌧🌧💦💦💦
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Thanks BB. As long as the rain stops☔☔. With the grandkids till Monday so will need a rest🤪🤪🤪
 
Apr 20, 2009
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💉🥵🥵🥵Kev must here. First night away N Yorks and wearing heavy duty waterproofs🌨🌨🌧🌧🌧💦💦💦
Dont worry Dusty, it's been like it here all day today and still coming down, sending it up to you tomorrow, enjoy your break.
 
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Jan 3, 2012
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They're not over yet - all over-50s and vulnerable are going to be offered a booster this autumn - and it's possible another jab next year to cope with all the new variants.
Actually i forgot about the booster jab this autumn i will be in that group thanks for reminding me :oops:
 

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