VW Golf estate towing capacity

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Mar 14, 2005
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I do take what you say ,but the problem can be the people doing the road side checks who may not agree and the possibility of prosecution if they insist on the caravan makers figure. . The problem is also if they say you are over the MTLPM they can stop you moving on even if you are right and they are wrong. It is a minefield that is not easily sorted, unless the caravan makers use the chassis limit. Some makers quote an MTPLM which is stupidly low which could store up trouble for the users. .
The authorities can't just say "your over the MTPLM". They have to have the evidence of weight measurement to prove it.

Besides which I did meet a couple of VOSA road side inspectors at a business event several years ago, and I was impressed with their knowledge of how vehicle weights are assessed and compared to the various limits etc. Unfortunately they didn't discuss caravans at the time. I would be very surprised if they didn't know exactly what they could or couldn't use.

You may have noticed how on some occasions there is a concerted effort by the VOSA and the Police to do road side checks on certain types of vehicle. Its probably limited to a range of vehicles based on the particular knowledge of the inspectors at the site on the day.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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I do take what you say ,but the problem can be the people doing the road side checks who may not agree and the possibility of prosecution if they insist on the caravan makers figure. . The problem is also if they say you are over the MTLPM they can stop you moving on even if you are right and they are wrong. It is a minefield that is not easily sorted, unless the caravan makers use the chassis limit. Some makers quote an MTPLM which is stupidly low which could store up trouble for the users. .
It should not be an issue at a roadside check as they can probably only act if the maximum gross weight on the mandatory plate is exceeded or if the tyre loading is exceeded. I would think that the mandatory plate would be on the axle or somewhere else on the chassis. I doubt that in many cases if they could prosecute using the sticker on a body of a caravan.
I am not sure about trailers however I do think there is different legislation for trailers under perhaps 2200kg and this may include caravans?
 
Mar 14, 2005
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lutzschelisch.wix.com
When a trailer is hitched to a tow vehicle the whole outfit is a motor vehicle, which is why your car insurance covers the trailer whilst it it hitched.
No, when a trailer is hitched to a tow vehicle, the outfit consists of two vehicles. That the insurance companies handle things differently is their own business and has nothing to do with the technicalities of vehicle Construction and Use Regulations.

It should not be an issue at a roadside check as they can probably only act if the maximum gross weight on the mandatory plate is exceeded or if the tyre loading is exceeded. I would think that the mandatory plate would be on the axle or somewhere else on the chassis. I doubt that in many cases if they could prosecute using the sticker on a body of a caravan.
I am not sure about trailers however I do think there is different legislation for trailers under perhaps 2200kg and this may include caravans?
The statutory plate is either on the chassis or, more often, in the front locker, except in the case of recent Elddis and Buccaneer caravans where the NCC label and the statutory plate have been combined and are located by the door.
Legislation for all trailers between 750kg (which do not have to have an overrun brake) and 3500kg (above which they have to have their own independent braking system) is the same. Since 2014 they are all subject to whole vehicle type approval.
 
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Jan 31, 2018
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I have given a x simple version. I feel the same. It seems to be a complex mess and have never heard of anyone being prosecuted. Usually just asked to movexetuff. But my motto Stay under the tow capacity of the car. Simples.
 
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Nov 6, 2005
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No, when a trailer is hitched to a tow vehicle, the outfit consists of two vehicles. That the insurance companies handle things differently is their own business and has nothing to do with the technicalities of vehicle Construction and Use Regulations.
There may be a difference between UK law and that on mainland Europe - in UK law, a trailer becomes part of the towing vehicle when attached, that's why it must show the same registration number.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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lutzschelisch.wix.com
There may be a difference between UK law and that on mainland Europe - in UK law, a trailer becomes part of the towing vehicle when attached, that's why it must show the same registration number.
No, there is no difference between the UK and mainland Europe as far as technical requirements, for example those relating to weight limits, are concerned, nor are there any differences with respect to insurance coverage. Even though trailers are registered in their own right on the Continent and have their own number plate, the insurance on the towing vehicle will cover damage caused by the trailer so long as it is hitched to the car as a single unit. However, the trailer still needs its own third party insurance to cover possible damage caused by the trailer when it is not hitched. To my knowledge, that is not a legal requirement in the UK.
 
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