What is it with MIcrosoft

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JTQ

May 7, 2005
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for those of you that say use my phone, my phone only makes calls, sends texts and photos,no internet and don't want it.
To send you a text message, an SMS, to your mobile does not involve any "internet" [mobile data].
They are only texting you a code number simply as any other message others send you.
 
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Jun 16, 2020
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Isn’t Buckman referring to the card reader that you insert your debit card into if you want to set up a new payeee, or pay a significant amount to an exiting payee. It gives you a code on laptop or computer screen. You input it into the card reader. The card reader gives yo another code that you input to the computer. The codes are random generated. Extra security is then inputting the new payees details for a confirmation check. Get on full stop out of place and you get a warning that the new payees account cannot be completely verified.
Could very well be. I have one of those readers. But generally use alternative methods.

John
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Latest update,spoke to a neighbour who suggested get MS to send code by e mail to wifes account,which they did,obviously not too concerned with sending code to random account,put in the code on my notification, then asked confirmation of personal details, ok so far then asked memorable question, ok so far then asked for details of last 3 emails sent including subject matter and e mail addresses that I had sent them to,I can't remember all that but anyway pressed submit and they then e mailed wife again to say account was now useable.
In answwer to previous question,I am using Chrome as browser, click on outlook, and enter e mail and than enter password, which is the way I have used for years without a problem, for those of you that say use my phone, my phone only makes calls, sends texts and photos,no internet and don't want it.
In answet to Bluetonic, MS are not protecting me, I have entered my email and password into Outlook correctly, I have jumped through their hoops, and even though they say the account is working it is not.
My understanding is that g mail is operated by Google, is that correct, and while it is a short term pain to change,I can soon notify my contacts book,and even weed out some of the senders from which I regularly get spam.
GMail have security aspects too. In one of my above posts I included a description of how MS can tell when you are more than 300 miles away ( or less I suspect) and then seek additional security confirmation. What makes you think Gmail or Yahoo would not have equivalent systems. The obvious answer is stick with MS but include your mobile number to receive security confirmation codes by text. Once received you input it into your laptop. Not that good in having someone elses email to receive security confirmation codes other than as a fall back, as you cannot guarantee they will be 100% available.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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With Apple, if I log on from a strange machine, I get a warning message telling me that someone is trying to access my account from near Daventry. 93 miles away!

John
 
Jan 3, 2012
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I paid for a canopy awning through outlook.com and Paypal and they wanted me verified it was me so they sent me a text with a code to my mobile and i put it in and it was paid
 
Mar 14, 2005
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So decision made,will wait till we get home,invest in new Chromebook and switch to g mail.While I appreciate all the suggestions from you all,my main thrust remains, I could access all my more sensitive accounts but not e mail even though I entered user name password etc, even used security information,if it rains might go and see how much a Chromebook is over here,although would need to be big saving to make it worthwhile.Added bebefit won't keep getting updates, as i understand it they are done automatically in the background
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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Would cost nothing however to address the original issue, simply by electing to have any and all security codes sent as text to your mobile.

Plus, I think, most if not all mobiles can still receive calls & texts free of charge in the EU.
 
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Nov 11, 2009
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I don’t know what version of Windows you are using but Windows 10 can have updates installed automatically in the background. Although for some specific updates Windows does seek the users permission prior to updating. When I departed Windows 7 for Apple even that version could be set to automatic background updates. My current Apple devices are set to automatic but all three ask permission prior to installing. I wonder if you have an update setting wrong on Windows ?

If you are planning a change of device it’s worth looking at Apple. Three generations of our family are all Apple, me being the last having to be dragged along. But the hardware is very reliable, software between my three devices is seamless and Apple updates rarely cause any issues, and if they do the issue is sorted very quickly.
 
Sep 26, 2018
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The fundamental problem is that the OP has set up effectively 2 factor authentication with MS. The underlying principle with 2 factor security is that the 2 factors are "something you know and something you have". The "something you know" is his password, the "something you have" is his home phone, rather than his mobile phone.

The simple fact is that Outlook has detected a French IP address is trying to access his email. AS others have said, MS is looking after his security, to try to stop him becoming yet another victim of yet another scam
 
Nov 11, 2009
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The fundamental problem is that the OP has set up effectively 2 factor authentication with MS. The underlying principle with 2 factor security is that the 2 factors are "something you know and something you have". The "something you know" is his password, the "something you have" is his home phone, rather than his mobile phone.

The simple fact is that Outlook has detected a French IP address is trying to access his email. AS others have said, MS is looking after his security, to try to stop him becoming yet another victim of yet another scam
I would imagine a Chromebook will use similar security for GMail as I use both Hotmail and GMail on my Apple devices. If I go into my Google account for any reason I am notified on my Hotmail account that my Google account has been accessed at what time and where. Also the Google account has 2FV, as do most of my accounts that could cost me money if things went wrong. PCv forums I have to trust 👍
 
Nov 11, 2009
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So decision made,will wait till we get home,invest in new Chromebook and switch to g mail.While I appreciate all the suggestions from you all,my main thrust remains, I could access all my more sensitive accounts but not e mail even though I entered user name password etc, even used security information,if it rains might go and see how much a Chromebook is over here,although would need to be big saving to make it worthwhile.Added bebefit won't keep getting updates, as i understand it they are done automatically in the background
Make sure if you do go for a Chromebook that it isn’t a brand new “ old” model as the Google support updates may not be contained for as long as you think.

 
Nov 6, 2005
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The fundamental problem is that the OP has set up effectively 2 factor authentication with MS. The underlying principle with 2 factor security is that the 2 factors are "something you know and something you have". The "something you know" is his password, the "something you have" is his home phone, rather than his mobile phone.

The simple fact is that Outlook has detected a French IP address is trying to access his email. AS others have said, MS is looking after his security, to try to stop him becoming yet another victim of yet another scam
The fundamental problem was setting up the home phone as the 2nd security location and then expecting it to work away from home. If the OP had set his mobile phone as the 2nd security location, it would have worked smoothly.
 

Sam Vimes

Moderator
Sep 7, 2020
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So decision made,will wait till we get home,invest in new Chromebook and switch to g mail.While I appreciate all the suggestions from you all,my main thrust remains, I could access all my more sensitive accounts but not e mail even though I entered user name password etc, even used security information,if it rains might go and see how much a Chromebook is over here,although would need to be big saving to make it worthwhile.Added bebefit won't keep getting updates, as i understand it they are done automatically in the background
Good luck if you decide to go with a Chromebook and switch to gmail. Personally I wouldn't recommend it and I think you'll find that it will be just as tricky for you and you'll have a new learning curve to negotiate. Security issues will still remain and you will still get updates which will often change how things work.

Using Gmail still requires username and password and you should turn on 2 factor authentication/verification - in which case you still have the same situation about receiving the code. 2FA codes ideally need to be sent to a different device to the one your logging on and a mobile phone is ideal for that if your using your laptop to log in.

Anything to do with Google raises questions of privacy - more so in my opinion than Microsoft or Apple.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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The fundamental problem is that the OP has set up effectively 2 factor authentication with MS. The underlying principle with 2 factor security is that the 2 factors are "something you know and something you have". The "something you know" is his password, the "something you have" is his home phone, rather than his mobile phone.

The simple fact is that Outlook has detected a French IP address is trying to access his email. AS others have said, MS is looking after his security, to try to stop him becoming yet another victim of yet another scam
We have used Outlook in France and Spain and have been been queried or sent a verification code so maybe this is something new as it is the first time I have heard of this. I am wondering if it is the provider of the service and not MS that is requiring the code?
 
Nov 11, 2009
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We have used Outlook in France and Spain and have been been queried or sent a verification code so maybe this is something new as it is the first time I have heard of this. I am wondering if it is the provider of the service and not MS that is requiring the code?
No it’s now the software providers along with other organisations like banks, credit card companies etc in order to reduce the likelihood of fraud. It’s a pain but unfortunately necessary.
I don’t know about Chromebooks but at one time android phones could be waiting a long time before an operating system or security update was issued. This was because Google would issue the update but the phone manufacturer didn’t issue it for installation to the users. Some could be waiting 12 months or longer. My old Windows phone like Apple had/have the updates directly from Microsoft or Apple, whereas Android phones don’t, except for the Pixel which is Google’s own phone. So they are always running the most up to date software.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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We have used Outlook in France and Spain and have been been queried or sent a verification code so maybe this is something new as it is the first time I have heard of this. I am wondering if it is the provider of the service and not MS that is requiring the code?
Then possibly you are not opting in for the higher level of security on offer; not something I would comfortably be doing.
 
May 11, 2021
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So decision made,will wait till we get home,invest in new Chromebook and switch to g mail.
Why do you want a new Chromebook just to get an email account? I have a Gmail account and access it through various devices, none of them Google (iPhone, iPad, Windows laptop, Macbook). As many people have pointed out, you need to set up and understand how two-factor authentication works; many systems now use it. I fear a change of mail provider is only going to cause you more strife than fixing the one you have. I have had a Hotmail account for 22 years and it works fine however and wherever I access it. I also have a Gmail account for backup and alternative mail needs. I also have an ISP-provided mail account that I never use, plus one that comes with my TV account, again never used.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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No it’s now the software providers along with other organisations like banks, credit card companies etc in order to reduce the likelihood of fraud. It’s a pain but unfortunately necessary.
I don’t know about Chromebooks but at one time android phones could be waiting a long time before an operating system or security update was issued. This was because Google would issue the update but the phone manufacturer didn’t issue it for installation to the users. Some could be waiting 12 months or longer. My old Windows phone like Apple had/have the updates directly from Microsoft or Apple, whereas Android phones don’t, except for the Pixel which is Google’s own phone. So they are always running the most up to date software.
On our Samsung phones we always got regular updates and they were android phones and never got asked for verification code. Only time I get asked for verification code is for banking and very occasionally when logging into our grocery account. No issue with that as it is necessary security.
I do not have Outlook on my phone as only have Gmail set up for a forum and do not use Windows on my phone. I keep that for my laptop use only.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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On our Samsung phones we always got regular updates and they were android phones and never got asked for verification code. Only time I get asked for verification code is for banking and very occasionally when logging into our grocery account. No issue with that as it is necessary security.
I do not have Outlook on my phone as only have Gmail set up for a forum and do not use Windows on my phone. I keep that for my laptop use only.
But do you know the date Google first issued the updates, thats where there has been criticism of the Android phone makers. They also add quite a lot of their own software on top of Android OS so that too will require updating. Such delays in the “ pipeline” don’t happen with Microsoft, Pixel or Apple devices. I don’t know about Chrome OS other than it’s largely a web based system with minimal processing power in the device, most activity being carried out on the web/ cloud. But it should be secure 👍
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Then possibly you are not opting in for the higher level of security on offer; not something I would comfortably be doing.
Apologies I do not understand your reference to higher level of security as surely that is with the bank or organisation and not down to the individual?
 
Jul 18, 2017
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But do you know the date Google first issued the updates, thats where there has been criticism of the Android phone makers. They also add quite a lot of their own software on top of Android OS so that too will require updating. Such delays in the “ pipeline” don’t happen with Microsoft, Pixel or Apple devices. I don’t know about Chrome OS other than it’s largely a web based system with minimal processing power in the device, most activity being carried out on the web/ cloud. But it should be secure 👍
I have no idea as only within the past 6 months I have been using Google very occasionally and not noticed anything. Unless desperate I avoided using Internet connection for apps like Google or websites as had limited data.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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For life's serious emails I use a Proton Mail free account.
Gmail for stuff of very little importance or more importantly potential impact.

Apologies I do not understand your reference to higher level of security as surely that is with the bank or organisation and not down to the individual?
Not only banks, as exampled by the OP Outlook also can require a second level of security, again as in the OP's case a phoned code.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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I would advise the OP not to change their email address, particularly if it's a business account. Unless it has been hacked and has some spam. Instead, just look at and improve the present security.

I was forced to change an address due to hacking. It has taken a couple of years to move it over. (Could have been quicker if I worked at it). I now have an apple account with zero spam. Which is most likely more to do with me being more careful than anything different with Apple.

When I was at work we got very little spam. I asked IT about it. It was all down to the control they had. Same with internet sites. Many were blocked. If I really needed it I would have to make an official request to have it unblocked.

John
 
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Sam Vimes

Moderator
Sep 7, 2020
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Apologies I do not understand your reference to higher level of security as surely that is with the bank or organisation and not down to the individual?
Not entirely true. While these organisations will have a high degree - although not always perfect - levels of security, the user has to play their part. Having poor password management is the users responsibility. As is having memorable data which cannot be guessed from social networks.

Organisations such as banks that offer verification codes may have this as an option that the user has to setup and if you don't do so then that's your risk.

Make sure your Anti-virus software is up to date and check the security settings in your browser of choice. If you must use social media be careful what you post - and on forums - because its available for the world to see.

Much more fraud is taking place these days by phishing emails and social media and social engineering. Preventing these malicious attempts to steal your information is largely down to the end user. Check the emails are from a genuine source. Don't open suspicious emails and don't click on unknown links in emails or web pages.

More and more we're seeing security checks with our online transactions and these are there for a reason. If you don't take advantage of them then 'caveat emptor'
 

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