Which drill?

Jun 17, 2011
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Hoping to move to screw in awning pegs having bought 15 from Aldi for £7.99. Now need a rechargeable drill. I have no idea what I am looking at. Advice please. We will use to put in the 15 and take them out, I still wind the steadies down. We often go off grid so won't have access to power. (Awning up and down only once per stay.)
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Get one with a lithium battery as they have longer lives than NiCad and generally are lighter for a given level of amp hour storage.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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Removing and driving screw in pegs can be power sapping, an 18v or 20v will be best suited.

18v and 20v outputs usually result in a pretty bigheavy drill, but will be mostly good for the job.

A single battery drill from say Aldi should be suitable and will be much less cost ly than a dual battery package, this should not be a problem if you are on EHU to keep the battery topped up.

Torque values are high on cordless drills but watch your wrists for unexpected shock loads, when it happens you will know what I mean :p
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Aldi currently advertising a 18v driver/drill at £49.99. Their kit us good.
https://www.aldi.co.uk/workzone-brushless-drill-driver/p/082864209100600?utm_source=Aldi&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=ProductImage&utm_campaign=NFSBDIY030818&sap-outbound-id=1D9844EA361C1B062F9289BD5DEFF6C87389A6D5
 
Mar 27, 2011
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Make sure drill has adjustable torque settings and start with it set on low number and gradually increase to required setting so that you don’t have to worry about sudden wrench to your wrist with unexpected shock as that can be quite severe and very painful.

BP
 
Jun 26, 2017
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Oh dear ...

I really hope that Aldii’s latest deal doesn’t mean that hard standings up and down the country are going to be (in some cases, even more) impossible to hammer pegs into because they’ve been obliterated by overzealous folk armed with their shiny new Makita drill and a handful of 300mm long SDS bits ! :eek:hmy:
 
Nov 11, 2009
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The Aldi drill does have electronic torque settings. I’ve found screw in pegs not to be very good on some sites especially if you aren’t on a made hard standing. If the substrate is rocky the screw finds it difficult to penetrate. I have standardised on rock pegs which have a coarse thread along the first section. They hold well in all conditions including grass. Using a steel hammer they go in without much effort and the hammers claw gets them out easily.
 
Feb 6, 2009
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I'm a little late to contribute to this topic.... :(
and I have only ever used my drill for drilling and as a superb screwdriver, so no experience of hammering things into hard standings (although the hammer function made short work of a concrete lintel which others drills had only managed to scratch

I bought it a couple of years ago from Screwfix,( they are still available) its made by Titan is quite light and small in form but very powerful and has been excellent in every way. I have other Titan equipment and it has all been of excellent quality. the drill cost £49 and comes with two batteries (18V) as standard and includes the usual nifty LED light that is so helpful when drilling in dark corners or at dusk!

The torque setting is easily adjustable ( so no sprained wrists!) and the Li ion battery charges in under an hour. I have only used the one battery so far and it doesn't seem to have deteriorated in the last two years. The second battery is still in its cellophane wrapper, as I thought I would keep it this way until the first reaches the end of its service life....this may be the wrong approach, but time will tell.!
Usual disclaimers, I have no connection with any of the folks involved ( other than as a happy customer.)

Regards to all, and always
Happy Caravanning
paws
 
Mar 14, 2005
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When you have a drill buy or make the long socket you need for the steadies - saves a lot of effort and grunting.
If you have a 'big' drill - 14v or above - check the torque setting before winding down the steadies as a big drill on top torque setting can lift the corner of the van and I know at least one instance where this has distorted a locker external door which was near the rear of the van.
 
Nov 6, 2006
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RayS said:
If you have a 'big' drill - 14v or above - check the torque setting before winding down the steadies as a big drill on top torque setting can lift the corner of the van and I know at least one instance where this has distorted a locker external door which was near the rear of the van.

Agreed - also be careful of using the high speed setting as many do. The screw thread of the steady runs through an alloy block, and a sudden stop winding up or down can split this, resulting in leg removal and at least the block needing replacement.
 

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