DashCams

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Jun 16, 2020
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Many don’t realise that if they submit videos of “bad” driving via the public portal to the police they may be called upon to act as a witness. This means giving a statement and if a case is pursued could in some circumstances be required to attend a court hearing.
Not all would, but if I were witness to an incident I would stand by what I saw. I am principled like that.

I once saw a car stopped at lights to turn right. A lorry pulled up inside of him. I was behind. The lorry driver got out and went to the elderly car driver who opened his window. Nothing was said, but the lorry driver simply punched the car driver. I wanted to get out, but the wife would not hear of it. But a lorry driver coming the other way came over and settled the situation.

I can only guess that the car had cut the lorry up further up the road. I saw the lorry turn into a depot just half a mile further.

I called the police with the details and numbers. I was asked if I would be prepared to be a witness in court. I said a definite yes. They told me that most people would not.

I did not hear anything further.

John
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Many don’t realise that if they submit videos of “bad” driving via the public portal to the police they may be called upon to act as a witness. This means giving a statement and if a case is pursued could in some circumstances be required to attend a court hearing.
That seldom happens because of the footage showing the incident. The "bad" driver can hardly argue against the footage and knows that they will probably lose in court and may face an even bigger fine.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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That seldom happens because of the footage showing the incident. The "bad" driver can hardly argue against the footage and knows that they will probably lose in court and may face an even bigger fine.
I did say “ may” in my post, but the portal isn’t a “snitch gate” where you just upload a video clip and then move on. You have to provide a raft of details to support your submission. That’s how it should given the video could lead to police action against another driver.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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I did say “ may” in my post, but the portal isn’t a “snitch gate” where you just upload a video clip and then move on. You have to provide a raft of details to support your submission. That’s how it should given the video could lead to police action against another driver.
Not exactly a raft of details. Your contact details and where the incident took place. Very simple actually as the footage will have a date and timeline in it. Not sure when you submitted your footage, but things have probably changed since?
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Not exactly a raft of details. Your contact details and where the incident took place. Very simple actually as the footage will have a date and timeline in it. Not sure when you submitted your footage, but things have probably changed since?
My dash cam was only fitted recently and I’ve not had any reason to upload any incident. But what I did do when it was first registered with Nextbase was to look at the process for uploading an incident video to the public portal. I selected the Wiltshire constabulary as the recipient force. Your force may be different but if not you have clearly understated the information required to make the submission. I copy a link. detailing the requirements for information.

 
Jul 18, 2017
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My dash cam was only fitted recently and I’ve not had any reason to upload any incident. But what I did do when it was first registered with Nextbase was to look at the process for uploading an incident video to the public portal. I selected the Wiltshire constabulary as the recipient force. Your force may be different but if not you have clearly understated the information required to make the submission. I copy a link. detailing the requirements for information.

This is for West Midlands police and is quite minimal. https://secureform.nextbase.co.uk/ Not sure if it takes you to our constabulary?
 

Sam Vimes

Moderator
Sep 7, 2020
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I'm no expert on legal matters but I'm pretty sure that Dashcam videos or stills might aid in an investigation but wouldn't qualify as submissible evidence in the event of a prosecution. They are too easy to modify.

It took me less than a minute to produce these two still images - videos would take a little more time. Obviously modified but with more effort better results can be acheived.

Before.jpgAfter.jpg
 
Jul 18, 2017
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For them it is probably easy to identify where a video has been manipulated. The digital watermark would tell them everything. Secondly if dashcam footage cannot be used as evidence this would create a big headache for many police forces who currently use it as evidence in prosecutions.
 

Sam Vimes

Moderator
Sep 7, 2020
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It's no that easy to tell if some videos/images have been manipulated and requires effort they may not wish to expend. Artificial Intelligence has made altering images all too easy and Deepfakes are often used to change the identity of people in scenes.

Digital Watermarking is one way of proving integrity of an image but I'm sure this is not a feature of many consumer grade cameras.

As I mentioned I believe the footage can aid an investigation but not used as actual proof i.e evidence
 
Jul 18, 2017
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It's no that easy to tell if some videos/images have been manipulated and requires effort they may not wish to expend. Artificial Intelligence has made altering images all too easy and Deepfakes are often used to change the identity of people in scenes.

Digital Watermarking is one way of proving integrity of an image but I'm sure this is not a feature of many consumer grade cameras.

As I mentioned I believe the footage can aid an investigation but not used as actual proof i.e evidence
You could be correct. I could be wrong, but with the police showing the suspect footage, more then likely the suspect will admit to the wrong doing if their identity can be confirmed. So no need for any footage.

Footage of a car doing something wrong and dangerous in front of you and if captured on a dashcam would be very difficult to use as evidence as no way to identify the driver.

I think that all the police can do is to send a letter to the registered owner of the vehicle in question asking for the identification of the driver. I think it is an offence if they do not respond. Once the driver has been identified, then they can be shown the footage and it is to be hoped that they own up.

However the crux of the matter is whether the police have sufficient resources to pursue what is, in their opinion, a minor matter?
 
Jun 16, 2020
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Here are the two videos I wanted to give the police, but could not as I had not included the segment before and after. Before I knew I needed to, I had deleted them.


OK not massively dangerous, but if the police had pursued it. Do you think the perpetrator would have disputed the evidence?

I would think that very few people would dispute the video evidence even though doctoring is possible. It may be they would need to prove a vindictive motive or conspiracy.

In my case, just getting the number plates obscured was a major job.

John
 
Jul 18, 2017
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We have had that sort of thing happen on more than one occasion on a roundabout. Worst was we were going straight over and in the correct lane and a car on our left instead of taking the first off entrance carried on around the round about and then cut across in front of us at our turn off as they continued around the round about.

In the small car that cut in front of us were five youngsters and the driver was a girl with ginger hair who also had freckles. We were in a Jeep Grand Cherokee so if we had hit them there woudl have quite a bit of damage to their car never mind themselves. This was before we had a dashcam fitted and one of the reasons why we had one fitted.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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We have had that sort of thing happen on more than one occasion on a roundabout. Worst was we were going straight over and in the correct lane and a car on our left instead of taking the first off entrance carried on around the round about and then cut across in front of us at our turn off as they continued around the round about.

In the small car that cut in front of us were five youngsters and the driver was a girl with ginger hair who also had freckles. We were in a Jeep Grand Cherokee so if we had hit them there woudl have quite a bit of damage to their car never mind themselves. This was before we had a dashcam fitted and one of the reasons why we had one fitted.
In some instances it is not incorrect for a car in the nearside lane to exit the island at exit 2, whilst a vehicle in the outer approach lane would be expected to exit at exit 3. If lanes are specifically marked then drivers should abide by the signage or road markings. When for example leaving a motorway with the van I would tend to stay in the nearside lane and signal right until passed exit 2 then signal left to exit at exit 3 for example. If there were specific road markings then I’d comply. It’s Rule 185 in the Highway Code.

IMG_3069.jpeg
 
Jul 18, 2017
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I have been driving for over 60 years so hopefully well aware of road rules etc. In this case all the entry roads onto the roundabout are 3 lanes and not two so if going straight across I woudl think that the middle lane would be the correct lane. still does not excuse someone on your left going cutting in front of you to exit the third or even fourth junction. They should have been on my offiside and not nearside.
 
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Jul 30, 2007
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Unless my eyesight is worse than I thought,I can only see 2 lanes approaching the roundabout in any directions.
I believe the nearside lane is to take exit 1 or 2.
Offside lane to take exit 2,3 or 4.
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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Unless my eyesight is worse than I thought,I can only see 2 lanes approaching the roundabout in any directions.
I believe the nearside lane is to take exit 1 or 2.
Offside lane to take exit 2,3 or 4.
I was obviously or maybe not for some, referring to the round about where my incident occurred and not OC's picture. :sneaky:
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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I have been driving for over 60 years so hopefully well aware of road rules etc. In this case all the entry roads onto the roundabout are 3 lanes and not two so if going straight across I woudl think that the middle lane would be the correct lane. still does not excuse someone on your left going cutting in front of you to exit the third or even fourth junction. They should have been on my offiside and not nearside.

If towing into a roundabout with our long caravan I would depending on the lane widths be inclined, where these are narrow, to take the left lane for all exits. Knowing how the van's far nearside corner would wipe out that lane anyway, so no not too bight an individual is tempted to use that lane.
Obviously I would be indicating I was intending going round up to the point where I was past the last exit to the one I was going to use where I would change the indication. Even then depending on how sharp that exit curve is I might well have to move way to the right across painted lanes to exit, but I would make my intensions clear.
I drive to suit what is possible with the vehicle/unit I am driving at the time. Just like with large HGVs I can't always keep the painted lanes.
I believe you need to drive alert to what others might potentially do, not simply assume what they are going to do, making allowances for everything that could, within my capabilities to do so.,
 
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May 7, 2012
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Many don’t realise that if they submit videos of “bad” driving via the public portal to the police they may be called upon to act as a witness. This means giving a statement and if a case is pursued could in some circumstances be required to attend a court hearing.
While this is possible the chances are minimal. Only cut and dried cases will normally be prosecuted and solicitors will normally advise clients to lead guilty having seen he footage, identification of a driver might be the one reason for a not guilty plea.
 
Jan 3, 2012
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Latest update brought a nextbase 522GW dashcam online from Nextbase just waiting for it to come just hoping it here before Saturday we are away again.
 
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