Dethleffs electric caravan!

Sep 4, 2017
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Battery comment - comparison.

BMW i3 Curb 1,200kg (2,645 lb) 22kWh (18.8kWh usable), LMO/NMC, large 60A prismatic cells, battery weighs 204kg (450 lb) driving range of 130–160km (80–100 miles) ~4h at 230VAC, 30A; 50kW Supercharger; 80% in 30 min

So if a modern 22kWh weighs 204 Kg, one can assume an 80 kWh will weigh roughly 4 times that ----806 Kg ???

Second comment: Not long ago the motor industry was telling us - Buy Diesel. Now Diesel is out, next story will be, buy electric. I cannot help but wonder is all this is about big business forcing us to spend more and more money to line their pockets. Just saying!
 
Feb 23, 2018
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I'm no mechanical engineer, but the idea of a powered axle on a caravan did occur to me (powered by the towcar) but I instantly dismissed it as being unfeasible; can a standard towbar take being pushed by a powered caravan? Would there need to be a special module in the car to tell the carvan what is happening electronically so it is all synchronised?... Obviously I was wrong.

I imagine the cost would be so high for this caravan (If it was launched at the moment) with Tesla levels of battery capacity that you would be better off buying a second electric car and keep your diesel for towing!
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Yes there would have to be some kind of control, but where it would located andcexactly how it would work is unclear.

I would not be unduely concerend about the strength of the tow bar fixings, after all they presently have to contend with pulling the caravan, and be sturdy enough to with stand the inertia of the caravan when braking heavily.

I do wonder if control technology from bicycle's would work, where the motor only assists the input to the pedels, but never takes the full load by itself.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Grey13 said:
Battery comment - comparison.

BMW i3 Curb 1,200kg (2,645 lb) 22kWh (18.8kWh usable), LMO/NMC, large 60A prismatic cells, battery weighs 204kg (450 lb) driving range of 130–160km (80–100 miles) ~4h at 230VAC, 30A; 50kW Supercharger; 80% in 30 min

So if a modern 22kWh weighs 204 Kg, one can assume an 80 kWh will weigh roughly 4 times that ----806 Kg ???

Second comment: Not long ago the motor industry was telling us - Buy Diesel. Now Diesel is out, next story will be, buy electric. I cannot help but wonder is all this is about big business forcing us to spend more and more money to line their pockets. Just saying!
The next few years re the motor industry will be interesting to say the least. The UK media reported last month large reduction in car registrations (20%+) but few mentioned that other countries were similarly affected. One principal reason was the new harmonised emissions test where some cars would just not pass it, so inventories have been run down by major sales campaigns prior to the regulations being enacted. Those model options may not appear again for buyers. Another factor was the dash for gas, or petrol. Again companies have ben caught cold be the down on diesels and cannot produce sufficient petrol models. One factor that wasn't mentioned is that if a makers fleet average fails to meet the EU levels then the company gets a heavy financial penalty on every additional car sold. For VAG this could add billions to their business costs and would undoubtedly meet consumer resistance via the rejection of higher prices. The trend towards petrol exacerbates this problem as petrol cars tend to emit more C02 than their diesel equivalent thus pushing the maker's fleet average higher. A friend in the motor industry tells me that al efforts are being targeted at hybrids and electric as the only way for motor makers to meet the emission targets, which are due to be reduced sometime in 2020.

2015 targets across a makers range were 130g/km. 2020 requires 95% of a makers range to be at 95gm/km, and 100% by 2021. The EU document shown in the link explains it. Even Brexit will not change things as if UK cars don't comply they cannot be sold in the EU. So best to buy your Aston Martin now :whistle:

https://ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/transport/vehicles/proposal_en
 
May 7, 2012
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My question if the towcar is far lighter than the caravan, is what happens if it is caught by crosswinds. Currently a conventional combination at those weights would be regarded as dangerous, so if this gets caught is it relying on the tow car to rescue it, as to me it probably could not.
I am also not sure how you would know if the power produced by the caravan would keep you within the towing limits as it might not be easy to work out what weight you are towing.
If stopped by the authorities how could you show you were towing within the cars limit?y
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Raywood said:
My question if the towcar is far lighter than the caravan, is what happens if it is caught by crosswinds. Currently a conventional combination at those weights would be regarded as dangerous, so if this gets caught is it relying on the tow car to rescue it, as to me it probably could not.
I am also not sure how you would know if the power produced by the caravan would keep you within the towing limits as it might not be easy to work out what weight you are towing.
If stopped by the authorities how could you show you were towing within the cars limit?y
Presently there is no UK legislation that would a trailer to provide or assist with motive power on the public roads. Special legislation had to be introduces to allow the infamous bendy busses to be used as technically the rear section was a trailer, and trailer are not allowed to carry passengers. I don't know if bendy busses had drive to teh trailer wheels, but I suspect not. It may be different in other parts of Europe and the world.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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ProfJohnL said:
Raywood said:
My question if the towcar is far lighter than the caravan, is what happens if it is caught by crosswinds. Currently a conventional combination at those weights would be regarded as dangerous, so if this gets caught is it relying on the tow car to rescue it, as to me it probably could not.
I am also not sure how you would know if the power produced by the caravan would keep you within the towing limits as it might not be easy to work out what weight you are towing.
If stopped by the authorities how could you show you were towing within the cars limit?y
Presently there is no UK legislation that would a trailer to provide or assist with motive power on the public roads. Special legislation had to be introduces to allow the infamous bendy busses to be used as technically the rear section was a trailer, and trailer are not allowed to carry passengers. I don't know if bendy busses had drive to teh trailer wheels, but I suspect not. It may be different in other parts of Europe and the world.
How do the seaside road trains get away with it? For years they have used a tractor dressed up as a railway engine towing six to eight trailers.
Was the bendy bus trailer powered?
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Dustydog said:
How do the seaside road trains get away with it? For years they have used a tractor dressed up as a railway engine towing six to eight trailers.
Was the bendy bus trailer powered?
Hello Dusty
I think I may have seen such multiple trailer devices, but the ones I have seen were not on the public roads, they ran along the esplanade or beach. so may have not have been required to meet road vehicle construction and use regs. It may also be their top speed was limited. It may be something to do with teh regs that cover show mens vehicles which do allow multiple trailers.

I'm grateful to OC for posting the Wiki link. Clearly some of the bendy busses did have motive power in the trailer section, and in some cases it was the only power, and it pushed the front section. But I do recall there was quite a big thing about them when they were first tried in the UK about them needing to have special provisions to run on our roads.

an inkling of what your describing, The seaside amusement multiple trailer train might have special dispensation I
 
Nov 11, 2009
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ProfJohnL said:
Dustydog said:
How do the seaside road trains get away with it? For years they have used a tractor dressed up as a railway engine towing six to eight trailers.
Was the bendy bus trailer powered?
Hello Dusty
I think I may have seen such multiple trailer devices, but the ones I have seen were not on the public roads, they ran along the esplanade or beach. so may have not have been required to meet road vehicle construction and use regs. It may also be their top speed was limited. It may be something to do with teh regs that cover show mens vehicles which do allow multiple trailers.

I'm grateful to OC for posting the Wiki link. Clearly some of the bendy busses did have motive power in the trailer section, and in some cases it was the only power, and it pushed the front section. But I do recall there was quite a big thing about them when they were first tried in the UK about them needing to have special provisions to run on our roads.

an inkling of what your describing, The seaside amusement multiple trailer train might have special dispensation I
Prof
You are right about rules having to be changed to allow bendy buses on public highways. There was a right to do in Bath with many objections but in fact on their designated routes which were from the centre to the two university they were very successful. But I don’t think they are used much if at all now.
 

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