• Please use the Forgot Your Password option to login to your account on the new platform.

I love my Cadac but..........

May 24, 2014
2,412
56
11,735
I love my Cadac but there are times when it just isnt convenient. When the weather is bad, or you get back to the grocklebox in the dark, its handy to have something useable in the awning, aka electric. I know many of you use the George Foreman but which one carries the greatest punch (pun intended). There are so many different ones, steel or aluminium, grill and melt, or just grill. which ones do you guys recommend and why. Any other makes worth a quick shufty?

As we are off to Corran/ Bunree shortly and the winds there can be horrendous, the Cadac is a non starter for that trip.
 
Nov 16, 2015
5,451
130
11,735
I am going to follow this thread, as i am finding carting around the cadac to be a bit of a pain. Last time out used it once in a week. 🙁
 
Feb 13, 2020
99
29
85
We've never taken anything but the portable gas bbq, sat on a multi-use camping table. Rain or shine (to be fair, its usually 'shine') breakfast and/or evening meal is cooked on it. Because it has a high and low rack, i prefer it to something like a one-level Cadac. Theres also no 'assembling'.
 
Mar 14, 2005
12,522
143
40,735
Perhaps its a sign of the times, look how many fads have phased in and out use. Sometimes it when new equipment becomes available it usurps older tried and tested methods

We used to make a lot of use of a pressure cooker, then when hookups became more common, we switched to a slow cooker. BBQ 's were superseded by gas powered ones, partly driven by sites becoming more fire safety conscious or concerned for their grass.

Its noticeable how the number of times Cadac'c get mentioned has reduced in recent years, have they had their time? If so what's coming over the horizon to take you all by storm?😃
 
Nov 11, 2009
6,912
263
25,935
Perhaps its a sign of the times, look how many fads have phased in and out use. Sometimes it when new equipment becomes available it usurps older tried and tested methods

We used to make a lot of use of a pressure cooker, then when hookups became more common, we switched to a slow cooker. BBQ 's were superseded by gas powered ones, partly driven by sites becoming more fire safety conscious or concerned for their grass.

Its noticeable how the number of times Cadac'c get mentioned has reduced in recent years, have they had their time? If so what's coming over the horizon to take you all by storm?😃
We had a Prestige Hi dome pressure cooker since our kids were tots. They are now mid forties. It was always the last thing my wife brought out to go in the car. Okay if caravanning but darned inconvenient if camping. Anywayv2 years ago she decided she wanted a new stainless steel one as they are “healthier”. I offered to renew the seals on the old Prestige Hi Dome. But lost that one. So a new Tower pressure cooker was purchased. It now cannot be used on account of a safety warning and recall. Such is progress.
 
May 24, 2014
2,412
56
11,735
To answer Prof, I dont think for a minute Cadacs have had their day. During the summer weeks, ours is used daily, often twice a day for breakfast and evening meal, and looking around the sites, the number of units using a cadac or similar tends to support that.
However, the Cadac does have limitations. Its isnt safe to cook in the awning for obvious reasons, although I have seen some do it. It isnt great standing outside with an umbrella trying to cook when the weather is bad, and in the winter, I would much prefer to cook under cover, hence some form of ELECTRIC appliance.
As Hutch says, it can also be a bit of a pain carting it around, especially the larger ones with all their kit and attachments, sometimes you just want to travel light.

The question was aksed "whether we had cookers in the caravans". Well of course we do, but I prefer to cook outside. I personally dont like the smell of stale cooking impregnating the furniture, bedding or wardrobes. We use our caravan cooker rarely, and on that subject, the shower never. If I am paying for a site with facilities, I will use them.
 
May 7, 2012
4,718
100
20,735
We have a Cadac bought using the special offer on the CAMH website which looked too good to miss. I agree it is a bit big for carrying around but there are only two of us normally so room is not a big problem. We used it successfully last year when we had guests and could sit outside the caravan in the sun and socialise and we have also used it for barbecues at home.
We are happy with our purchase and it seems to have improved our caravanning.
We had used disposable ones a couple of times before but they were not anywhere near as good.
 
Feb 13, 2020
99
29
85
The question was aksed "whether we had cookers in the caravans". Well of course we do, but I prefer to cook outside. I personally dont like the smell of stale cooking impregnating the furniture, bedding or wardrobes. We use our caravan cooker rarely, and on that subject, the shower never. If I am paying for a site with facilities, I will use them.
It just shows how we all differ. We never use the cooker/hob for anything other than say, warming a pie, or a tin of beans, as we also don't want cooking smells pervading everywhere. On the other hand, we very rarely if ever use site facilities. While we may also have 'paid for them' (if we aren't just in a field with a tap and waste disposal), we have also 'paid' a whole lot more for the facilities in our 'van. Which are always at least as clean as site washrooms, and a great deal more convenient at 3 am when you need a pee!
 
Feb 13, 2020
99
29
85
Ah, thats different. That IS acceptable.
I will concede i have used the showers abroad maybe twice during the day when its hot. To save refilling the barrel if the tap isn't close. But otherwise, its our own washroom every time.
But i know people who will neither use the cooker - for anything, or the loo/shower either. Which begs the question, why have they got a caravan at all? If its just a travelling bed. Or, expensive 'tent'.
 
Nov 11, 2009
6,912
263
25,935
I will concede i have used the showers abroad maybe twice during the day when its hot. To save refilling the barrel if the tap isn't close. But otherwise, its our own washroom every time.
But i know people who will neither use the cooker - for anything, or the loo/shower either. Which begs the question, why have they got a caravan at all? If its just a travelling bed. Or, expensive 'tent'.
Presumably some don’t have an ageing prostate either 😱
 
Last edited:
Apr 20, 2009
4,703
36
20,685
Here Thingy, listen to this:
Got home this evening and darling wife decided to cook us a treat (Think it's Valentines day) anyway as I walked in the kitchen I shouted "where are you" the smitch in the kitchen was unbelievable, she was only using her new George Foreman to cook our nice juicy steaks.
Had to open all windows, patio door and even started the fan on the cooker.
Steak was blimming lovely though.
Your choice:rolleyes:
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
1,748
46
19,685
However, the Cadac does have limitations. Its isnt safe to cook in the awning for obvious reasons, although I have seen some do it.
For years through the 70s we used frame tents and all models had kitchens integrated into the design furnished with net windows, where gas hobs were used.
Everyone cooked in them in all weathers, other than occasions when the charcoal BBQ was used outside.
I can't see the obvious reason, or particular safety issue using a Cadac in an awning, provided things are well vented and kept away from the fabric.
We had Gaz , petrol and paraffin Coleman lanterns, and in our scouting days a Primus stove.
All were safe if used sensibly, and IMO our Cadac 2-Cook 2 remains safe to use in the awning. Even the external gas point of the van, is positioned to be within the awning.
It is simply these things need using safely, and that applies inside a well vented awning or outside.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mike
May 24, 2014
2,412
56
11,735
I remember the frame tents well with a bit of a projection for a kitchen, though I was only a child then :sneaky:
The point has often been made though that its not the flame really but the noxious gas given off, and its a risk I really wouldnt want to take, though I guess with proper ventilation its doable if not advisable.

Anyhoo, as I never did get a direct answer about which George Foreman Grill I went ahead and picked one, delivery tomorrow. If anyone is interested, there are some great savings on ao.com. Mine was £109 reduced to £38.

For Kev.....do these things give off a lot of smoke are were you cooking whale steaks?
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
1,748
46
19,685
The point has often been made though that its not the flame really but the noxious gas given off,
It is the very same LPG being used as with the van's hob that's within the confines of the van.
Therefore, from the gas combustion products, it being used in the better ventilated awning ought to be less of a hazard.
The LPG in both cases ought to be cleanly burnt, so carbon monoxide levels, the real hazard byproduct of combustion will be very low.

If it is burnt food, then neither in the van or outside do we go for burning our food.
Electric toasting grills though of course do as much toasting of the food, unless one is into cremation style BBQing.

Not thought of adding a Foreman grill, it's reducing the clobber that we take, that I am more focused on these days.
As an alternative some models for the two of us, though not the 10 servings version would be less bulky than our Cadac, but little use off an EHU so effectively for us a non starter.

______________________________________________________

On reflection reference use within an awning, I have thought it might be the more modern awnings themselves rather than the Cadac 2-Cook 2 that could be an issue.

Many modern awnings seem to be made of higher flammability fabrics than before. Having one of those attached to the van is on reflection itself a worry.

Not that mine is that type, and nor is the Cadac used anywhere near the fabric to put the awning at risk.
 
Last edited:
May 7, 2012
4,718
100
20,735
I would not use a Cadac or any nther grill or barbecue in an awning simply because of the fire risk. I accept nthat in a good size one you can keep this away from the walls but the risk is still there and could scorch it even if it does not catch fire.
The risk from CO2 is there but I feel unlikely. Very few awnings are draft proof, so you do get air circulation, and if it is hot and sunny you would normally have the doors and possibly walls open.
In our first caravan, which had no heater, I remember like many we did use the gas hob to get some heat, which with hindsight was probably unwise.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
1,748
46
19,685
I certainly don't place mine close enough to risk scorching the fabric or suffering grease spats.

I find it set up in the awning for the duration minimises the overall hassle, I can use it in all weathers and winds and it minimises the theft risk compared to leaving it outside. Just a lot more convenient all round, and done being aware of and mitigating the risk, presents no hazard.

On the fire and scorching risk I frequently see all sorts of cooking kit in use in a windbreak corral. There the thing is four times closer than I would set up mine and way more a hazard.
 
Nov 11, 2009
6,912
263
25,935
  • I would not use a Cadac or any nther grill or barbecue in an awning simply because of the fire risk. I accept nthat in a good size one you can keep this away from the walls but the risk is still there and could scorch it even if it does not catch fire.
    The risk from CO2 is there but I feel unlikely. Very few awnings are draft proof, so you do get air circulation, and if it is hot and sunny you would normally have the doors and possibly walls open.
    In our first caravan, which had no heater, I remember like many we did use the gas hob to get some heat, which with hindsight was probably unwise.
  • The risk is from carbon monoxide not carbon dioxide. Gas burning correctly generates virtually no CO so using a gas hob within the caravan is not a risk given the ventilation within the caravan. The risk of CO from charcoal bbqs is another matter given that such bbqs do generate a lot more CO. Only relatively recently some campers died from CO poisoning whilst sleeping in their tent. The disposable bbq had been used and placed in the tents front area for disposal the following day. A very sad accident. Hence the increase of warning notices at CMHC and CCC sites.
 
Feb 13, 2020
99
29
85
Are there many campers that still bother with charcoal bbq's? I cannot think of anything worse than having to light something three-quarters of an hour before i can use it. Then have to wait another age till it goes out and find somewhere to dump the ash etc.
 
Mar 27, 2011
527
39
18,885
My first Cadac was a table top model which I used for a couple of years, its Still going strong being used by a relative so is probably 10 years plus years old now, I then bought the free standing version as the cooking area was bigger so much more useful, a year or so ago I updated it again with the latest version which I treated myself to so I could have a couple of extra cooking surfaces but my main reason for having the latest model was because I could, as simple as that, whenever we are away I erect as well as an awning a pop up gazebo that takes literally 5 minutes to erect, it has no sides so I then put windbreaks around 3 sides and I cook under this every morning for breakfast and every evening unless we are eating out, having it under there means unless the the rain is horizontal I can cook there in almost any conditions, my Cadac is amongst my first things that get packed into the van or the car and I can’t imagine being without it, a bit like the time I set up on a serviced pitch and then found I’d left the hose and valve to connect the aqua roll, too far to drive home and fetch it so found nearest caravan dealer and bought another, if I forgot the Cadac I’d almost certainly do the same.

BP
 
Nov 11, 2009
6,912
263
25,935
We were on a site last September when the weather was really good and at the weekend it filled up with tent campers and camper vans alongside caravans and motorhomes. Groups pitched together and there were many charcoal bbqs lit. I have a Cadac and two charcoal bbqs. And have no problem lighting the charcoal and waiting a time to cook. What’s not too like as it gives time for a chat, nibbles and the all important drink. Off course the weather is the key thing, but I don’t feel there's much enjoyment being outside cooking if it’s not fine. Irrespective of gas or charcoal.
l have been BBQing since the mid 1980s when I lived in Canada. Even in winter we had weekly bbqs at work and outdoors. But the weather was good albeit cold. Big risk was the beer freezing. I aquired my first Weber when I swopped my skis for a friends bbq. This was on account that the RAF regulations for transit boxes would have required cutting the skis in half, whereas a large Weber just fitted in the given box.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
1,748
46
19,685
We still have and on the right occasions use our 1979 Pyromid Outdoor Cooking System. More for lengthy social meals with friends where we would cook roasts or whole small salmon, as IMO it never met my definition of a BBQ.

We chose with that, not to use charcoal, but "Heat Beads", compressed anthracite dust briquettes.

Now that never was used other than outside.

Charcoal or its equivalent is still about.

The link is to a modern version as the originals are now long gone.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0OTOEGlP1Q
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts