Just an opinion

Mar 14, 2005
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Motor movers. Now I see that they are a good idea for people who caravan alone, the elderly or those who cannot manhandle a caravan for whatever reason, or someone who wishes to store their van at home on a tight driveway.

However when on site, there haven't been any times that I can't reverse the van onto the pitch even when you have to attack it a few times (and I am in no way a reversing expert- just average!). Sometimes I watch an outfit arrive, stop in the middle of the roadway/ field, unhitch, move the car, attach the mover and then inch the van backwards and forwards until in position. Seems a lenghty old job to me. The same happens at the end- inch the van up to the towball to hitch up.

Why mention this- well I like my gadgets as much as the next man, maybe I should get one? But don't see the benefit. Can someone explain to me what I am missing?

As I said earlier, I know that this product is of immense use to some caravanners, but to some it seems to be a bit of 'look at me!' Any thoughts?
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hello Paul

I have a mover fitted to my Provence mainly for when in storage, as it has to fit between 2 even bigger twin axles, and at home I have a muppet of a neighbour who parks directly across from my drive, making it impossible to manouvre 15 feet of Mondeo and 24 feet of Provence.

On a site I have only used the mover to put it on levelling blocks or one particular spot there was a rather large spot of mud with standing water where the car would have had to swing into when siting the van.

I got it mainly to save the clutch particularly in the above situations, but it's also useful when cleaning it as it means I don't get a hernia when its against the wall at home.

They are my reasons for buying one, not to have a big boys toy or to say look at me, but to save myself from getting a hernia or expensive repairs to my car. However, if the need ever arises where I need to use it site the van I will, and it is in no showing off IMHO.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hello Paul

I have a mover fitted to my Provence mainly for when in storage, as it has to fit between 2 even bigger twin axles, and at home I have a muppet of a neighbour who parks directly across from my drive, making it impossible to manouvre 15 feet of Mondeo and 24 feet of Provence.

On a site I have only used the mover to put it on levelling blocks or one particular spot there was a rather large spot of mud with standing water where the car would have had to swing into when siting the van.

I got it mainly to save the clutch particularly in the above situations, but it's also useful when cleaning it as it means I don't get a hernia when its against the wall at home.

They are my reasons for buying one, not to have a big boys toy or to say look at me, but to save myself from getting a hernia or expensive repairs to my car. However, if the need ever arises where I need to use it site the van I will, and it is in no showing off IMHO.
Hi Andrew

Parking opposite a driveway is not allowed - you could do something about it. If you cannot get off your drive it is obstruction.

Depends on how you want to get on with the neighbours! Not worth falling out over but talking to him/her about it may help.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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use my mover almost every time,its easier and less frustrating trying to get caravan into position first time with car.with a mover its perfect every time,after all thats what i bought it for,to manouvre the caravan where i want it to go
 
Jun 7, 2005
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Paul

I like you could see no reason to purchase a motor mover myself, I consider myself decent at reversing with a caravan and never have any problems getting the van where I want. Until last Friday exiting a pitch in Brittany. Problem was coming out of the pitch (not getting in)the combined length of the vehicle and caravan would not allow me to make the turn required without the side of the van fouling on a hedge. Result, scuff mark on door. Only way I could get out was the reverse of getting in which involved reversing the van 300 yards between hedges with about 2 inches clearance on either side. A mover would have allowed me to get the van out of the pitch then hitch to the tow vehicle. Many will say the answer would be to push the van out before hitching but its a big twin axle and a pig to push around corners.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hi Andrew

Parking opposite a driveway is not allowed - you could do something about it. If you cannot get off your drive it is obstruction.

Depends on how you want to get on with the neighbours! Not worth falling out over but talking to him/her about it may help.
Clive

He's an idiot, and apparently nothing can be done as long as he parks on the road and not the footpath. I was told to move my car a few weeks ago by plod (they'd had a complaint apparently) as approx 9" of front bumper was hanging over the pavement.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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I don't doubt that they make it easier to move about in a restricted space but I've found a cheaper solution. I only take the caravan to where I don't have any manoeuvrability problems. Besides, I have a payload issue. The 35kg or so of extra deadweight of the motor mover means 35kg less stuff that I can put on board the caravan.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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The only people that pooh pooh them or query their validity are those who don't have one.

It's the same with all gismos - once you've got one you'll wonder how you ever managed without one before. I got mine 'cos I'm basically a lazy so - and - so but also 'cos I have quite bad arthritis in both knees. However I have also found that the low speed of the mover helps immensely when positioning the 'van on wet grass. Of course I endorse all the other issues ie burning clutches etc etc. On top of that my drive is up a slight incline and has a slight curve in it so my Motor Mover is indispensible.

A word of caution though. Judging by the number of classified ads. selling jockey wheel mounted movers that have hardly been used would suggest to me that the chassis mounted versions ie Truma/Carver, Reich and Powerwheel, are far more user friendly.

Extra payload? Surely if you're towing up to or within the 85% rule this really shouldn't be much of a problem, should it?

There's a lot of things in caravanning that I would forego before I went without my Motor Mover. In fact being the way I am, I doubt very much whether I would be able to continue without it.

Spend the money! You won't regret it and there's an offer on page 75 of PC this month. A Truma system supplied and fitted for
 
Mar 14, 2005
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The only people that pooh pooh them or query their validity are those who don't have one.

It's the same with all gismos - once you've got one you'll wonder how you ever managed without one before. I got mine 'cos I'm basically a lazy so - and - so but also 'cos I have quite bad arthritis in both knees. However I have also found that the low speed of the mover helps immensely when positioning the 'van on wet grass. Of course I endorse all the other issues ie burning clutches etc etc. On top of that my drive is up a slight incline and has a slight curve in it so my Motor Mover is indispensible.

A word of caution though. Judging by the number of classified ads. selling jockey wheel mounted movers that have hardly been used would suggest to me that the chassis mounted versions ie Truma/Carver, Reich and Powerwheel, are far more user friendly.

Extra payload? Surely if you're towing up to or within the 85% rule this really shouldn't be much of a problem, should it?

There's a lot of things in caravanning that I would forego before I went without my Motor Mover. In fact being the way I am, I doubt very much whether I would be able to continue without it.

Spend the money! You won't regret it and there's an offer on page 75 of PC this month. A Truma system supplied and fitted for
 
Mar 14, 2005
9,810
705
30,935
lutzschelisch.wix.com
The only people that pooh pooh them or query their validity are those who don't have one.

It's the same with all gismos - once you've got one you'll wonder how you ever managed without one before. I got mine 'cos I'm basically a lazy so - and - so but also 'cos I have quite bad arthritis in both knees. However I have also found that the low speed of the mover helps immensely when positioning the 'van on wet grass. Of course I endorse all the other issues ie burning clutches etc etc. On top of that my drive is up a slight incline and has a slight curve in it so my Motor Mover is indispensible.

A word of caution though. Judging by the number of classified ads. selling jockey wheel mounted movers that have hardly been used would suggest to me that the chassis mounted versions ie Truma/Carver, Reich and Powerwheel, are far more user friendly.

Extra payload? Surely if you're towing up to or within the 85% rule this really shouldn't be much of a problem, should it?

There's a lot of things in caravanning that I would forego before I went without my Motor Mover. In fact being the way I am, I doubt very much whether I would be able to continue without it.

Spend the money! You won't regret it and there's an offer on page 75 of PC this month. A Truma system supplied and fitted for
 
Mar 14, 2005
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As the originator of the post, I had to respond! As you will see in my original post- those with health, access problems etc- fine. I really do appreciate the benefits a mover would give. As a 31 year old with no access problems I simply ask is there a benefit with normal day to day touring? A year ogo I was poor at reversing- now I feel I am OK- still a lot to learn- but after another years practice I am better. Just wondered if there was a benefit to the average guy. I could afford one, but do I NEED one?

Still smile at bloke with level field, capable outfit, loads of access, and their motor mover whirring the van into position!
 
Mar 14, 2005
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im very capable of reversing or pushing the van,but i still had a mover fitted.they are brilliant,and yes i nearly always use it regardless of the site pitches.if you can afford one paul you'll not regret buying one.i was the same as you,do i really need a one.after a couple of bad pitches where siting with car was impossible due to trees bushes ets,and unable to push due to soft ground on some occasions,changed my mind,and ive never regretted it one bit.it was money ELL SPENT.
 
May 21, 2008
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Motor movers are a useful tool for those who have difficulty in positioning trailers. As someone who has towed trailers of all discriptions from 3foot long to 60foot long,for 30 years, I am good at reversing and positioning my twenty foot caravan where I want it in any situation. But I have a motor mover!!

I have to get a caravan out of my garden up a slope at 45 degree's to the drive and there is no way I can move 1300kgs of van safely on my own without it, or get the car near it to use that to pull it out.

We all laugh at those who are directionally challenged when it comes to reversing the caravan, but how many actually go to the aid of the poor chap? I quite often get asked to put my brother-in-law's caravan up the side of his house as he cannot reverse left handed and there's only a foot to play with.

Thats probably why people elect to use the motor mover because they then have control of their situation.

One of the biggest fears of any novice to towing is, how the hell do i turn the outfit round and how do I reverse into a parking spot. They can't help it, but a mover can help them.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Hi Paul

I have a mover for reasons that you've given, access to property and health. However there have been a couple of occasions off the top of my head where it would be better to use one regardless of your reversing skills.

One was on a site where the only available pitches were quite wet, and everyone who was trying to reverse onto them were churning up the grass and sliding around. I engaged the mover and put it on it's spot with no problem and no mess. Much to the disappointment of my neighbour who was looking forward to watching me try to do it by reversing.

The other time was on a site in Kent, where some of the available pitches were left empty all week, as it was physically impossible to push a caravan onto them whilst attached to the car. They were on a fair slope which prevented them from being pushed manually. I was on a pitch next to one of them and reversed on OK, although my car had to pass with a couple of feet of the caravan opposite us due to the angle that I had to take.
 

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