Side to side levvelling help

Jul 10, 2016
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Hi

advice needed please on side to side levelling. I use a motor moving and am trying to level side to side using the yellow levelling blocks. However whenever I try to either reverse onto the blocks or move forward on the blocks the caravan swivels and skews and sometimes the wheels just slip and don't actual climb up the blocks.

I am sure there must be an easy way of doing this, any advice please?

thanks
 
Oct 17, 2010
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I have same problem when wet.. You could try a little extra pressure on the mover. Then set van at a slight angle the swivel backwards up the ramp. Ramp side mover in reverse other side forward.
it will swivel within its own length.
 
Oct 12, 2013
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I got rid of my levelling ramps and just carry around a few bits of offcuts of decking or plywood just to elevate one of the wheels to level off .
 
Nov 11, 2009
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It can help if you drop the nosewheel such that it is swivelled in the direction you wish to move and then engaged in the slot in the lower section of the tube. This will restrain its tendency to pivot.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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The movers are not sophisticated enough to ensure when both wheels are driven they rotate at the same speed, and if one wheel meets a resistance like those ramps it will go slower, hence the van swinging.

To counter this, move up to the ramp normally, then use just that wheel's drive to start up the ramp. The van will obviously swing, but then stop the climbing wheel and just drive with the opposite wheel to correct or a bit over correct. Then as needed advance the climbing wheel a bit more, and so on in this zigzagging mode where the mover is just driving the single wheel at a time, not trying to drive both together..

That said these commercial yellow ramps are a big ask being a bit too steep, so as others I use a few off cuts of decking plank. These are IMO best used as discrete steps, a staircase, made of varying lengths to facititate this stacking as a progression of steps and plateaus. Done in this way as opposed to using a ramp avoids post levelling the van wanting to roll back down the "ramp", which if that is a roll backwards can present issues with handbrake not holding precisely where stopped. If using an Alko Secure lock, then nice long step plateaus allow the aligning needed though you need some long planks.
 
Mar 24, 2014
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I gave up trying to level using a ramp when I could never get the caravan level AND the wheel in the right place to fit the Al-Ko wheel lock. I now use a Milienco leveller which works well for me. I do know that some with Twin Axles swear by the Lock'n'Level (https://www.locknlevel.co.uk/).
 
Nov 6, 2006
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Scrap the levellers and heavy bits of wood and go for Lock N Level. Then you can scrap the jack, its jacking points and their weight as well
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Let’s establish the type of ground surface,.

Grass:
Wet . Can be difficult. A yellow ramp will sink.
I use 1 metre boards 1 inch thick , tapered , enabling a max of 4 inch max.

Gravel:
Get a grip boys.
Kick more gravel under the lower wheel. Sorted.

Tarmac:
Not level? Can’t be far off?
Live with it maybe? Or move to another pitch.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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chrisn7 said:
Scrap the levellers and heavy bits of wood and go for Lock N Level. Then you can scrap the jack, its jacking points and their weight as well

How much can having a Lock N Level really save unless we are only discussing twin axle vans?

I don't carry a jack for the van or use jack brackets, I can use the car's if I ever need to, but my first choice if in trouble is to let the recovery people use theirs.

Lock N Level don't quote their units weights, but my SA vans wooded planks total 4 kgs, so a LNL plus suitable pump will have to be very light to save much of what IMO is very little to save.

What does a single axle LNL weigh? A pump I guess will add at least another kg.
 
May 24, 2014
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If you really need to use those ramps, position your caravan by mover if needed then re attach the car and tow it up.
However like most others, i too use a couple of bits of timber. My yellow ramps have been dumped in a corner of my workshop where they belong.
The lock n level are decent enough. I had one for some time though have now sold it.
When i first started out i used old floorboards. Have tried everything including the wind up Milenco contraption and have come full circle back to where i started.
Lesson to be learned there. The old timers managed just fine without all these fancy gadgets.
 
Nov 16, 2015
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I think it's all down to practice, Normally use a Milenco Quatro ramp and reverse the car onto it depending on how high the boss wants it using a two way radio. , if I use the motor mover, a power touch , It's also no problem as I make sure the grip distance is good , otherwise the mover can slip on the tyre. . Powertouch will replace the old "sandpaper" type roller for the newer Type of "knotched" for a minimal fee , much better, roller.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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Thingy said:
If you really need to use those ramps, position your caravan by mover if needed then re attach the car and tow it up.

The old timers managed just fine without all these fancy gadgets.
Yes indeed we old timers still do, and yes it was a learning curve with some "failed" kit living now unused in the shed.

Just a few words of warning re towing it up ramps.

An issue here is that when you uncouple there is every chance even with the hand-brake fully applied the van is going to roll backwards a bit down the ramp losing the level achieved. That's if you can uncouple the tensioned hitch in the first place. This roll back being here an unwanted feature of the van braking system's "autoreverse" mechanism.

Using the car to push the van back up the ramp is "better" in that regard, but start a steady reverse some two feet before the ramp and complete as an unhesitating one off move, or risk the autoreverse still playing up by jamming the brakes on., if they are not set up well. This, single unhestitating move is easier said though than done! Again here, there could be issues uncoupling what will be now a compressed hitch.

Therefore, those planks that instead of forming a sloping ramp, but rather a staircase of level plateaus, is far better. Again, simply it takes away either roll back or forward as it stops on the flat.

IMO it is best to tow it up if using the car, as that way burning the clutch from any unwanted intervention by the autoreverse playing up is avoided, still really put on the hand-brake fully.
 
Jun 17, 2011
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Had this problem with rollers slipping when wet. Try the one roller trick and lean on the caravan on that side, the van will then go up the slope. Chock that wheel and then swivel using the other roller. Check the level again. I have found that reversing up the slope with the car can work but if the ball is new and the Alko pads are new getting the hitch off the car can be difficult.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Why do most people reverse up the ramps to get level?

Far easier and safer to pull forwards onto a ramp..
And the handbrake over run mechanism won’t be involved as stated earlier.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Dustydog said:
Why do most people reverse up the ramps to get level?

Far easier and safer to pull forwards onto a ramp..
And the handbrake over run mechanism won’t be involved as stated earlier.

If I can’t kick the dirt I pull up the ramp as the car responds more smoothly. But your comment re handbrake is at odds with JTQ above who mentions problems with rolling back due to over run brake. Little wonder newbies find it confusing!
 
Jun 20, 2005
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otherclive said:
Dustydog said:
Why do most people reverse up the ramps to get level?

Far easier and safer to pull forwards onto a ramp..
And the handbrake over run mechanism won’t be involved as stated earlier.

If I can’t kick the dirt I pull up the ramp as the car responds more smoothly. But your comment re handbrake is at odds with JTQ above who mentions problems with rolling back due to over run brake. Little wonder newbies find it confusing!
Clive reversing , the auto reverse system kicks in after about 3 feet. The hand brake may appear on but it isn’t. I thought JTQ said the same?
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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Dustydog said:
Why do most people reverse up the ramps to get level?

Far easier and safer to pull forwards onto a ramp..
And the handbrake over run mechanism won’t be involved as stated earlier.

The handbrake with its related autoreverse issue will be involved if you pull up the ramp, as then the van wants to roll backwards and that is where the autorevrse's charateristics come into play.

The van is likely to roll back a bit, so defeating your attempt at levelling, but if the handbrake is not very well applied so fully charging the energy holding brakes re-applicating spring in the brake rod, it could continue then on its way backwards down any incline there might be.

From a clutch point of view yes indeed it is better to pull onto the "ramp" though as said earlier forget using a sloping ramp but use a stepped set of planks so the tyre rests on the flat not a slope, then both issues are addressed.
Still ensure the handbrake is really pulled vertical to ensure the brake re application energy is there in the spring should it ever be needed.
 

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