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what3words

Nov 11, 2009
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There’s a new system for mapping the world that subdivides it into 3x3m squares, each with a unique identifier comprised of three words. A recent news report described how a lady,s car left the road and couldn’t be seen from the road. The police used the “what3words” app to locate her exact position. She wouldn’t have been able to work out how to use Google maps or Apple maps to determine her longitude and latitude and for someone possibly in shock just saying three words that precisely define your location is a potential life saver.

Here’s a link to the BBC report

Three-unique-words 'map' used to rescue mother and child https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-47705912
 
Nov 16, 2015
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Its been out a couple of years now, but you have to be very precise with the spelling.

If you enter //. Intro.nurture.universal. you get the blue Lias pub and caravan site.

Enter // . Intro. Nurture.universals. And you end up in The Labrador sea a couple of hundred miles off of Greenland.
The App is very good from Playstore.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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EH52ARH said:
Its been out a couple of years now, but you have to be very precise with the spelling.

If you enter //. Intro.nurture.universal. you get the blue Lias pub and caravan site.

Enter // . Intro. Nurture.universals. And you end up in The Labrador sea a couple of hundred miles off of Greenland.
The App is very good from Playstore.[/quote

I think even the British police would question the location of your crash if you got it that wrong :)
App is useful and it’s satellite view is more up to date than Google or Apple maps. I think the verbal exchange of the words are it’s strongest feature as you are more likely to be trying to talk to the emergency services. Assuming the phone is charged or has a signal but that works for all comms.

A number of car makes are now incorporating it into the cars accident response outputs.
 
Nov 16, 2015
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You can be just as precise on Google maps, by using the Plus codes. Ie, on the map search type in 7JHF+76 and you will find a caravan pitch at the Blue Lias Caravan site, where as the pub in 7JHF+9J.

The plus code for a location can be found on the left hand side when you drop a pin mark on the map its the four little dots in a cross.

 
Nov 11, 2009
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EH52ARH said:
You can be just as precise on Google maps, by using the Plus codes. Ie, on the map search type in 7JHF+76 and you will find a caravan pitch at the Blue Lias Caravan site, where as the pub in 7JHF+9J.

The plus code for a location can be found on the left hand side when you drop a pin mark on the map its the four little dots in a cross.

Yes but what3words doesn’t require you to know where you are in order to drop the pin. It immediately gives you your location
 
Nov 11, 2009
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EH52ARH said:
You can be just as precise on Google maps, by using the Plus codes. Ie, on the map search type in 7JHF+76 and you will find a caravan pitch at the Blue Lias Caravan site, where as the pub in 7JHF+9J.

The plus code for a location can be found on the left hand side when you drop a pin mark on the map its the four little dots in a cross.

Yes but what3words doesn’t require you to know where you are in order to drop the pin. It immediately gives you your location
 
Mar 14, 2005
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I must admit I'm fascinated by maps and mapping, and the advent of Google Maps (other map systems are available) was a revelation to the mapping industry. I still love paper maps as well.

This thread was the first I'd heard of "What3words" and it's a fascinating project. Having looked at a few adjacent squares, there is no immediately obvious relationship in the word selections, so it's not something you could use instead of grid references on a paper map for planning orienteering routes, unless you have a computer loaded with the map data also.

I can see the advantage for the emergency services, as in difficult situations it's easier for most humans to remember three words rather than a long string of numbers and letters. It can also help if communications are poor.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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ProfJohnL said:
I must admit I'm fascinated by maps and mapping, and the advent of Google Maps (other map systems are available) was a revelation to the mapping industry. I still love paper maps as well.

This thread was the first I'd heard of "What3words" and it's a fascinating project. Having looked at a few adjacent squares, there is no immediately obvious relationship in the word selections, so it's not something you could use instead of grid references on a paper map for planning orienteering routes, unless you have a computer loaded with the map data also.

I can see the advantage for the emergency services, as in difficult situations it's easier for most humans to remember three words rather than a long string of numbers and letters. It can also help if communications are poor.
Prof
I agree with your views on maps and when on holiday I will spend ages just looking at the OS, or foreign equivalent, map of the area as its so useful in planning days out , walks, and just giving an understanding of the area, which even OS loaded onto a phone doesn't give you.

What "what3words" will do is stop Dominos delvering to your neighbour :whistle:
 
Nov 16, 2015
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Or it can help deliver to the bottom of your garden if you wish. I suppose " delivery Drones" will be using it. The Application for Smart phones is very easy to use.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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I suppose Yodel could use it to tell you which (or whose) rubbish bin they've left your parcel in! :whistle:
 
May 24, 2014
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In my wifes case the same three words could be used for every location

'Where am I'
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I read that all new Mercedes are now having it installed into the cars systems and the reviewer thinks that it will be used to provide a location direct from the car's emergency assist system. Lack of signals will always be a problem wherever one tries to call for assistance but its good step forwards for the vast majority of users where signals are available.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I see that the Mountain Rescue Team that rescued four ‘idiots in trainers’ from Ben Nevis during Storm Ciara used What3words to locate them. It was fortunate that there was a good enough signal. The Lochaber team didn’t mince their words on social media; giving more than three descriptors of those who ventured out so ill prepared.
 
Nov 16, 2015
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I meet up with some motorcycle mates on a Wednesday lunchtime, and we use "What3words" to know which pub and which bar to meet in. A great system.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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It’s so accurate that it will lead you to the correct beer tap :) Now that’s what I call a really useful app.
 
May 7, 2012
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I have added this to my phone as it looks good. With my luck though if I do break down there will be no signal!
 
Oct 8, 2006
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I read that all new Mercedes are now having it installed into the cars systems and the reviewer thinks that it will be used to provide a location direct from the car's emergency assist system. Lack of signals will always be a problem wherever one tries to call for assistance but its good step forwards for the vast majority of users where signals are available.
Not a problem if you have an emergency and are in a no signal area. If yu have an emergency and you press the emergency button the call will go out on any infrastructure it can find - at least it should......
 

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