whats best N regs shogun or discovery mpg

Jan 14, 2006
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hi,

having bought a compass 510 vantage I need to change the tow car for a better weight ratio, I have been considering a shogun or discovery but having bought the van the coffers are low for the tow car. I am being told that n - r reg discoverys and shoguns are o.k. if looked after, has anyone got one that age, what should i look for ? and what mpg can you get.

thanks for reading my message
 
Aug 28, 2005
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Lee

Like anything in life no two cars are the same your could buy a right peach of a car second-hand and equally a right lemon, the thing is with any cars of this age these cars cost serious money when new and so parts aren't necessarily that cheap. My father in-laws shogun which is of a similar age has just had to have a new head gasket .
 
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Lee,

From your post on another forum, you are already having problems with the Compass. Why do you feel that you need to go so far out with a Shogun/Discovery? Your Compass evidently has a maximum gross weight of 1200 kg so many normal cars would happily tow it. As you seem to be discovering with your van, a bargain is not necessarily so.
 
Jan 14, 2006
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Lee,

From your post on another forum, you are already having problems with the Compass. Why do you feel that you need to go so far out with a Shogun/Discovery? Your Compass evidently has a maximum gross weight of 1200 kg so many normal cars would happily tow it. As you seem to be discovering with your van, a bargain is not necessarily so.
hi scotch lad,

thanks for the info, another estate might be an option, we currently have an astra 1.7td estate and a honda aerodeck 2.0 estate. both are getting on now and need updating, so we can now buy one car as we don't need two anymore. I was told that i would be better going for the 4x4 type with the size of van we are considering to pull.
 
Dec 16, 2003
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A friend of mine has a 2.8 Pajero import ( Shogun is UK name only) as he needed a 4X4 for his work. The import was cheaper than Uk model two years older and came fully loaded with full Japanese service history and full check on legitmacy. The car was immaculate and in show room condition depit having 38k on the clock. He has had no trouble getting parts and the dealer put new tyres on the car. It tows car trailer well with even a 2 ton van on it! Even has twin batteries fo the Japanes climate. May be worrth considering as you can get a nice newer car for your money. Insurance was not a problem despite the scare stories.
 
Nov 1, 2005
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Hi Lee. It's not for me to say what anyone can afford, but if running costs are your main motivation I'd go for the Discovery. I admit I have slated Landrover in the past, but while they may go wrong they are at least relatively cheap to fix. The Shogun on the other hand may not go wrong, but if it does you'll need very deep pockets. How does
 
Jul 26, 2005
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Lee,

Having currently a Shogun in the family and previously owned a RR I would go for the Shogun every time for the following reasons - superior build qaulity, better performance, better accessories, more durable, superb auto transmission set up particularly for towing, more reliable and better to drive and tow with.

Go for an LWB (SWB is cramped with choppy ride) with as low miles as possible and FSH.

With large auto 4x4's of any make, fuel economy is pants don't expect much more than low twenties for diesel or petrol and about 18 for towing. If you do want economy LPG is the thing, our Shogun is a gasser and does about 18 solo and 15 towing but that's not bad with LPG at 39p per litre.

Look at the POCUK website for owners opinions and cars for sale - you should get a 98 facelift LWB with circa 70K miles from the trader or e-bay for about
 
Jun 11, 2005
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Hi, we now tow with a Kia Sorento but have still hung on to our other tow car which is a SAAB 9000 CSE 2.3 Turbo. It isa graet car with loads of space, and so much torque. Solo it will do 36-38mpg ona run, under normal town and country it does nearer to 30 mpg and when towing our last ABI Daystar MIRO at 1260kg we got 23 mpg. Go fora late model P, or R reg and they are cheap and you can still get single owner ones. It's build quality was up with MERC and BMW and ours has done 120K with almost fault free operation. There are SAAB specialsts who charge far less than SAAB dealers but we use our local garage. The only change made was to use MAD rear spring assiters which were fitted for 1 hour labour. Have a look at some of the SAAB forums they will give you an idea.
 
Nov 1, 2005
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I'm not sure whre the Saab fits in between a Discovery or Shogun Clive, but I have a real Saab. A 900i. With 199500 miles on the clock it still runs sweet and can give the local GTi mob a fright. I hardly use it now, but can't find it in my heart to sell it. Superb cars.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Both vehicles are excellent at what they do. At this age you need to buy on condition rather than likely MPG or which one is theoretically "better" than the other.

I have driven both and each has their own advantages. With the Discovery it tends to be the Lucas electrics, with the Shogun it will be any spare that is needed because they are expensive.

One reason why there are loads of old Land Rover's on the road but relatively few of the equivalent age Japanese 4x4's is that repairing the later becomes increasingly uneconomic.

Repairing a Land Rover is relatively easy and about as kind to your wallet as it is possible to be.

Buy one of the Land Rover mags and look at the cost of things like a replacement starter motor -
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Both vehicles are excellent at what they do. At this age you need to buy on condition rather than likely MPG or which one is theoretically "better" than the other.

I have driven both and each has their own advantages. With the Discovery it tends to be the Lucas electrics, with the Shogun it will be any spare that is needed because they are expensive.

One reason why there are loads of old Land Rover's on the road but relatively few of the equivalent age Japanese 4x4's is that repairing the later becomes increasingly uneconomic.

Repairing a Land Rover is relatively easy and about as kind to your wallet as it is possible to be.

Buy one of the Land Rover mags and look at the cost of things like a replacement starter motor -
 
Jul 26, 2005
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Sorry Clive but my experience of buying parts for Jap 4x4's has not shown them to be any more expensive than LR bits. All service items are roughly the same and items like Radiators and Alternators are probably cheaper if you don't go the main dealer route. The point is though you don't need any parts, expensive or otherwise, these vehicles are inherantly reliable and will happily go to 200k plus miles without needing anything major done.

The Mitsi electrical systems have components, connectors and relays which are almost aircraft standard in quality and Alternators and Starters just carry on working. Likewise the transmission just carries on working, it doesnt leak it's oil on your driveway either.

As for LR's being easier to work on, well I did the timing belt on my 3.0 V6 last year and was amazed at how simple it was, only needed about 3 spanner sizes, the anciliary belt adjusters are simple screwjacks and above all no straining with a giant bar to get the crank pully undone like some engines I could mention. True the plugs are a bit of an elaboration to get to but they are platinum tipped, last for 62K miles and only cost a tenner each.

I note also your advice in another thread on buying a diesel Rangie - if I was confronted with all the pitfalls that you brought up I would run a mile. In fact before I read it I must admit at being tempted into LR ownership again, the beautiful leather and walnut interiors are very beguiling, but not now mate, you've really put me off.

So to sum up, if you want a reliable work horse buy a Shogun, Land Cruiser or Trooper or two Disco's so you always have a spare when the other one is being repaired.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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I don't own either at the moment, but would put the choice a different way.

Choose the Disco if you don't mind picking up a spanner or have a friend in the trade. You will find it more rewarding to own and you will have more pride in your car. Parts prices are generally cheap and more importantly easy to source.

Choose the Shogun if your biggest spanner is the one that tightens the nuts on your bike wheels. These cars will get you around day after day, but without any soul. You won't start a love affair with the Shogun, but you won't hate it either. Bear in mind, letting the garage fix any faults is going to hit your pocket hard.

Personally, I would take the gamble with the Disco. Get a good one (yes they do exist) and you will have trouble free motoring and if it does go wrong there is a huge amount of backup to call on.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Plus the cameraderie that goes with the Green Oval.When did you last see Japanese 4x4 drivers aknowledge each other?There isn't really a choice to make.My present Range Rover has had a troublesome month, but I still feel proud to drive it.Land Rovers may not be infallible, but they are the best there is!
 
Aug 28, 2005
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Lol,

I think you've got it absolutely right it is very easy for us to say oh it's easy to do this and that and you'll find this ... But it assumes people want to spend weekends with cars rather than their Children, grand children etc

Probably why the Japanese cars where so successful in the first place was the fact that they could do 6000 miles (remember those days) between services. Something that products from BL sadly couldn't do. Now we know that LR, Vauxhall etc have all started to make decent cars in the UK so the divide realty isn't there things like style, and practicality are now higher on our mind as we now accept reliability as the norm.

Regards Monkeys H
 
Mar 14, 2005
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No doubt at all about the superb Japanese electrics I renovated an old Suzuki motorcycle and was mightily impressed at the way the wiring loom was split into three with unique connestors so that it could only go back together one way. This motorbike after being stored in a shed with chickens nesting where the cylinders should be fired up on first touch of the starter. Only problem - the indicators worked accross the bike rather than on each side - only thing where there was a 50/50 choice as to how to connect things up.

Compared to Lucas they were streets ahead in the 70's and 80's - Not so much of a difference now tho'

As for cost of other spares etc - that is why there are SO MANY Shoguns and Troopers older than 20 years still going stong out there! They must outnumber Land Rovers - ooh - 1 to 100?

LMAO!!!

Only Japanese 4x4 I have real respect for is the Nissan Patrol - a truly awsome beast - aggricultural yes - but able - most certainly.
 
Aug 28, 2005
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No doubt at all about the superb Japanese electrics I renovated an old Suzuki motorcycle and was mightily impressed at the way the wiring loom was split into three with unique connestors so that it could only go back together one way. This motorbike after being stored in a shed with chickens nesting where the cylinders should be fired up on first touch of the starter. Only problem - the indicators worked accross the bike rather than on each side - only thing where there was a 50/50 choice as to how to connect things up.

Compared to Lucas they were streets ahead in the 70's and 80's - Not so much of a difference now tho'

As for cost of other spares etc - that is why there are SO MANY Shoguns and Troopers older than 20 years still going stong out there! They must outnumber Land Rovers - ooh - 1 to 100?

LMAO!!!

Only Japanese 4x4 I have real respect for is the Nissan Patrol - a truly awsome beast - aggricultural yes - but able - most certainly.
Clive did you never see the Hilux on Top gear ?? if ever there was an advert for a car this was it

Monkey husband
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Good grief! Are you sitting there waiting to pounce???

LOL - just a joke!!

Yes I saw this Top Gear episode and enjoyed it imensly!

But have you driven one of the things - TRULY AWFUL!!

Only the Americans could think they are good - especially jacked up ones like on "Back to the Future I II & III"

As for offroading forget it with a standard one - Front and rear overhang more than a Mondeo!
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Emmerson,

Sorry another myth - look at POCUK they even have a Yellow diamond badge so's fellow club memebers can wave to each other.
But Land Rover drivers don't need to be given a badge to recognise each other! their's is known throughout the world _ the GREEN OVAL!
 
Mar 14, 2005
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No doubt at all about the superb Japanese electrics I renovated an old Suzuki motorcycle and was mightily impressed at the way the wiring loom was split into three with unique connestors so that it could only go back together one way. This motorbike after being stored in a shed with chickens nesting where the cylinders should be fired up on first touch of the starter. Only problem - the indicators worked accross the bike rather than on each side - only thing where there was a 50/50 choice as to how to connect things up.

Compared to Lucas they were streets ahead in the 70's and 80's - Not so much of a difference now tho'

As for cost of other spares etc - that is why there are SO MANY Shoguns and Troopers older than 20 years still going stong out there! They must outnumber Land Rovers - ooh - 1 to 100?

LMAO!!!

Only Japanese 4x4 I have real respect for is the Nissan Patrol - a truly awsome beast - aggricultural yes - but able - most certainly.

I saw that Mr Monkey, and to be frank, was overwhelmed by it. Absolutely amazing, I believe they were going to stuff and mount the thing at the end as it really deserves to be recognised for what it is, one almighty tough truck, with a deserved reputation for reliability. I have driven a couple too, and I must say, I hated them. Vague steering, noisy engine limited vision, cramped back seats (crew cab), quite a thirst (comparatively) and sitting behind the wheel is like an adventure in the waste bins of a plastics factory. But if at the start of your motoring life you were told you will only own one vehicle, ever, the Toyota would have to be close to the top.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Good grief! Are you sitting there waiting to pounce???

LOL - just a joke!!

Yes I saw this Top Gear episode and enjoyed it imensly!

But have you driven one of the things - TRULY AWFUL!!

Only the Americans could think they are good - especially jacked up ones like on "Back to the Future I II & III"

As for offroading forget it with a standard one - Front and rear overhang more than a Mondeo!
Just because you typed it faster, doesn't mean you thought it first!

;o)
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Good grief! Are you sitting there waiting to pounce???

LOL - just a joke!!

Yes I saw this Top Gear episode and enjoyed it imensly!

But have you driven one of the things - TRULY AWFUL!!

Only the Americans could think they are good - especially jacked up ones like on "Back to the Future I II & III"

As for offroading forget it with a standard one - Front and rear overhang more than a Mondeo!
Amazing - we have had similar experience - mine was being driven in a Hi-Lux when first it would dig its nose in to the slightest incline, then when we had that sorted it would strand itself on its rear end!

If it had a tow bar fitted forget it!

After a while it became a real pain and we parked the Hi-Lux in a Pub Car park and completed the route (Green Lanes of Dorset - arround Pimperne - Fabulous!) in a LR 90 and a Trooper. No problems thereafter.

The Hi-lux is a great go anywhere truck for, say, a Builders Yard. But the serious stuff - forget it.
 

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