Speed limiters could be launched on UK cars within months under new EU rule

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Jun 20, 2005
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They were sticklers for correctness. Especially being at the posted speed limit as you came up to the speed limit sign. But not too slow prior to the sign or that wasn’t liked, or any slight increase prior to leaving the speed limit. Still makes me very unpopular on the A429 between Cirencester and the M4 junction.
Plenty of tail gaters especially on the Malmesbury side 😵‍💫😵‍💫

John, The Speed Awareness course I did certainly opened my eyes! Some of the videos were amazing. We all thought the replay wasn’t the original but it was. A great lesson in what “you don’t see”!
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Plenty of tail gaters especially on the Malmesbury side 😵‍💫😵‍💫

John, The Speed Awareness course I did certainly opened my eyes! Some of the videos were amazing. We all thought the replay wasn’t the original but it was. A great lesson in what “you don’t see”!
One thing I find very annoying is if you are in a speed zone i.e. 30 or 40mph is that you get a tailgater trying to push you to go faster. Strangely enough this hardly every happens when driving the Jeep, but happens frequently when driving the wife's smaller 1996 Corolla.
What I do sometimes in the Corolla is that I put my foot on the brake enough for the brake lights to come on. I find this a good deterrent especially when you do it more than once.
With the Jeep if the cruise control is set to 30mph and the vehicle exceeds 30mph, the vehicle will automatically brake and brake lights will light up.
I am certainly not speeding up to satisfy the idiot sitting almost on top of my rear bumper.
 
Nov 6, 2005
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One thing I find very annoying is if you are in a speed zone i.e. 30 or 40mph is that you get a tailgater trying to push you to go faster. Strangely enough this hardly every happens when driving the Jeep, but happens frequently when driving the wife's smaller 1996 Corolla.
What I do sometimes in the Corolla is that I put my foot on the brake enough for the brake lights to come on. I find this a good deterrent especially when you do it more than once.
With the Jeep if the cruise control is set to 30mph and the vehicle exceeds 30mph, the vehicle will automatically brake and brake lights will light up.
I am certainly not speeding up to satisfy the idiot sitting almost on top of my rear bumper.
It's important not to get "bullied" into driving any faster than you feel safe, whether that's at the speed limit or below. When that happens, I'd prefer them to overtake and clear off away from me.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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It's important not to get "bullied" into driving any faster than you feel safe, whether that's at the speed limit or below. When that happens, I'd prefer them to overtake and clear off away from me.
Thing is that they don't want to overtake especially in a 30 or 40mph zone as they probably can't anyway and find it easier to try and "bully" you into speeding and it is not just white van man doing this.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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I am amazed at some of those who tailgate and give the impression the can’t wait to get past. When safe to do so, a straight and open section, I get over and give them every chance to get past, why don’t the take it, often they then drop back, then close up again on bendy sections.

What put me off taking the IAM course is I had an initial assessment. At one point I needed to hang back behind a row of parked cars waiting for on coming traffic. When clear I drove past. The told me I did not position the car out far enough to get a clear view down the road. I told her I could see perfectly well and if I had been any further out oncoming traffic would not get past. The fact is, from the passenger seat she could not see past, but she failed to appreciate we were in different positions.

Rightly or wrongly I admit to slowing down and speeding up while passing speed signs. Yes I know it’s technically wrong, but I don’t wish to deliberately annoy those around me. For others who do this here is a word of warning. In Wales, (at least in some parts). The have introduced warning signs ahead of the actual speed sign. They then position cameras just after the sign. That’s what caused my visit to the speed awarness course. ☹


John
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I am amazed at some of those who tailgate and give the impression the can’t wait to get past. When safe to do so, a straight and open section, I get over and give them every chance to get past, why don’t the take it, often they then drop back, then close up again on bendy sections.

What put me off taking the IAM course is I had an initial assessment. At one point I needed to hang back behind a row of parked cars waiting for on coming traffic. When clear I drove past. The told me I did not position the car out far enough to get a clear view down the road. I told her I could see perfectly well and if I had been any further out oncoming traffic would not get past. The fact is, from the passenger seat she could not see past, but she failed to appreciate we were in different positions.

Rightly or wrongly I admit to slowing down and speeding up while passing speed signs. Yes I know it’s technically wrong, but I don’t wish to deliberately annoy those around me. For others who do this here is a word of warning. In Wales, (at least in some parts). The have introduced warning signs ahead of the actual speed sign. They then position cameras just after the sign. That’s what caused my visit to the speed awarness course. ☹


John
I have done two police driving courses and on both it was a revalation as to how far the police driver moved across to get the best view of the road. On sweeping left hand bends he was in the opposite lane holding position with the vehicle to be overtaken before then accelerating hard. He also tended to move up a gear as soon as the speed increased but prior to actually starting to physically pass the vehicle to be overtaken. His line being that when passing a long vehicle/ train you don’t want to be changing gear upwards.

Im puzzled as to why you should think slowing your speed as you approach a lower speed limit sign should be taken as deliberately annoying the following drivers. Vice versa when leaving a speed limit. Gentle easing off as you approach should not be annoying. Doing a safety car F1 re start on leaving the limit might upset some. 😂
 
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Jun 20, 2005
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Same here Clive. As any caravanner knows never drive into a hazard. Hold way back and use the Whole road for maximum vision. The IAM Observer I had was a a stickler for overtaking as swiftly as possible. Her view was the less time the overtaking manoeuvre took the safer. So accelerate long before pulling out etc. I suspect this is why I got nicked on the A361 North Devon Link Road😥😥
 
Jun 16, 2020
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I have done two police driving courses and on both it was a revalation as to how far the police driver moved across to get the best view of the road. On sweeping left hand bends he was in the opposite lane holding position with the vehicle to be overtaken before then accelerating hard. He also tended to move up a gear as soon as the speed increased but prior to actually starting to physically pass the vehicle to be overtaken. His line being that when passing a long vehicle/ train you don’t want to be changing gear upwards.

Im puzzled as to why you should think slowing your speed as you approach a lower speed limit sign should be taken as deliberately annoying the following drivers. Vice versa when leaving a speed limit. Gentle easing off as you approach should not be annoying. Doing a safety car F1 re start on leaving the limit might upset some. 😂
I did say 'deliberately' but that might be too strong a word. But while gently slowing down to a speed limit ahead of the sign (which is obviously correct). It does have an affect on some of the followers who clearly do not expect that action. I have noticed that the method of passing speed signs is quite different between England and Wales since Wales introduced the policy. I have nothing against the newish way of signing the Welsh do. But I do admit to it catching me out.

I also went on a police driving course, but it was purely theory. It lasted for quite a few weeks at 1 evening per week. and was extremely interesting. The Police driver who was our lecturer was truly excellent. I guess there was about 80 attendees. The hope was to make it a continuously repeated course but that did not happen. perhaps the funds were not allocated. A shame because it was worthwhile. It was held in the canteen in Gloucester's old HQ building. It was made very clear to all of us by a number of personnel there that they detested us civilians coming into the building. But opinion was divided.

That policemen was a blues and two's driver himself. But was clear on the differences and was never encouraging us to drive in that manner. But he would highlight the differences.

One of the things he mentioned, which I gathered was controversial in police driver circles, is changing gear before a corner. If I remember, the art was to make sure all changes were made well before the corner and before the wheel was turned. Never during or after. He did not think that was conducive with progressive driving. He said that that was what failed more police driver tests than anything.

John
 
Jun 20, 2005
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John
It‘s never too late to join the IAM . I did my test prep with the Cirencester Group. You are not taught but observed and then explained how to do it better. All based of Roadcraft. The test is conducted usually by a senior Police Examiner. Running commentary wasn‘t mandatory but was expected for a short time.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I did say 'deliberately' but that might be too strong a word. But while gently slowing down to a speed limit ahead of the sign (which is obviously correct). It does have an affect on some of the followers who clearly do not expect that action. I have noticed that the method of passing speed signs is quite different between England and Wales since Wales introduced the policy. I have nothing against the newish way of signing the Welsh do. But I do admit to it catching me out.

I also went on a police driving course, but it was purely theory. It lasted for quite a few weeks at 1 evening per week. and was extremely interesting. The Police driver who was our lecturer was truly excellent. I guess there was about 80 attendees. The hope was to make it a continuously repeated course but that did not happen. perhaps the funds were not allocated. A shame because it was worthwhile. It was held in the canteen in Gloucester's old HQ building. It was made very clear to all of us by a number of personnel there that they detested us civilians coming into the building. But opinion was divided.

That policemen was a blues and two's driver himself. But was clear on the differences and was never encouraging us to drive in that manner. But he would highlight the differences.

One of the things he mentioned, which I gathered was controversial in police driver circles, is changing gear before a corner. If I remember, the art was to make sure all changes were made well before the corner and before the wheel was turned. Never during or after. He did not think that was conducive with progressive driving. He said that that was what failed more police driver tests than anything.

John
Changing gear on a motor bike when on a bend can be a sure invitation to visit the verges. Cars are somewhat more forgiving, but the theory still holds good.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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John
It‘s never too late to join the IAM . I did my test prep with the Cirencester Group. You are not taught but observed and then explained how to do it better. All based of Roadcraft. The test is conducted usually by a senior Police Examiner. Running commentary wasn‘t mandatory but was expected for a short time.
Thanks, but no thanks. I have never been a great driver. Just average. Though like many of us. In my younger days I thought I was the only one who knew what he was doing.

I calmed from this attitude and improved accordingly. I now believe I have gradually changed again in my older years. No longer am I in any hurry to get anywhere. But I am conscious not to get in the way of others, (even the idiots, I let them go).

I am far more aware of hazards and my surrounding. But at the same time my reactions have slowed.

John
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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Changing gear on a motor bike when on a bend can be a sure invitation to visit the verges. Cars are somewhat more forgiving, but the theory still holds good.
I was on an old police bike in a right hand bend at speed when it jumped out of gear. Luckily I was "cutting" the corner and it was in the early hours of the morning.
Two things you can do and one is to pray and the other is not to try and select a gear. I coasted around the bend almost touching the nearside verge. Shortly afterwards all the bone rattling police bikes were then replaced with Yamahas 350cc. Spares for the British bikes like BSA, Matchless, Norton Triumphs etc were no longer available. This was in the late sixties.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I was on an old police bike in a right hand bend at speed when it jumped out of gear. Luckily I was "cutting" the corner and it was in the early hours of the morning.
Two things you can do and one is to pray and the other is not to try and select a gear. I coasted around the bend almost touching the nearside verge. Shortly afterwards all the bone rattling police bikes were then replaced with Yamahas 350cc. Spares for the British bikes like BSA, Matchless, Norton Triumphs etc were no longer available. This was in the late sixties.
The Yamahas were great and so reliable. I changed from my AJS 650 to a 350 Yam complete with expansion boxes. What a yowl
 
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Jul 18, 2017
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The Yamahas were great and so reliable. I changed from my AJS 650 to a 350 Yam complete with expansion boxes. What a yowl
Changing from the old British bike to the Yamaha 350 was like getting off a camel and getting onto a jet aircraft. They were a lot more comfortable, a lot faster, more economical and more essential to us, extremely reliable even in the bush
 
Jun 20, 2005
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My BSA C15 leaked oil from the primary chain case like a leaky sieve. No amount of machining the mating surface new gaskets and a progression of various grades of Hermetite, Red green and gold, it still,leaked . Moved onto a Honda 250 twin super dream. What a difference. Powerful, excellent road holding, instant start, free revving, no oil leaks!
 
Nov 11, 2009
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My BSA C15 leaked oil from the primary chain case like a leaky sieve. No amount of machining the mating surface new gaskets and a progression of various grades of Hermetite, Red green and gold, it still,leaked . Moved onto a Honda 250 twin super dream. What a difference. Powerful, excellent road holding, instant start, free revving, no oil leaks!
Most Japanese bikes had horizontal gaskets not the vertical leaky ones on British bikes.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Most Japanese bikes had horizontal gaskets not the vertical leaky ones on British bikes.
Do remember the Arial four square which I think was about 1200cc and one of the biggest engine bikes on the market. They were made to last!
 
Jan 31, 2018
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OK-on the motorbike test the 'make good progress is key' but no breaking of speed limits, yet there seems to be a culture amongst bikers that the speed limit should be exceeded and this seems to be helped along by the police Road craft advice/booklet. I've not read it-nor will I do the IAM test-car or bike-far to regimented in terms of what you have to do ie going through the motions. My brother did the iam car test and was v sceptical, a friend did the bike test and his instructors drove him potty in terms of their lack of consistency-going out with one meant different advice to the other. I have two wonderful bikes capable of far in excess of the speed limits but I enjoy getting there, not exceeding it-unless on a track day. And I really don't want to do anymore tests at the mo! I employ defensive riding and always know what's behind!
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Do remember the Arial four square which I think was about 1200cc and one of the biggest engine bikes on the market. They were made to last!
Like Hutch I always fancied one but never enough dosh. They were not a great bike. The two rear cylinders tended to seize up as they were not in the direct cooling airflow.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Beat me there Clive.That’s not how I remembered my Honda or Suzukis
Weren’t your crankcases sub divided horizontally with gearbox integral too. Less leak sources and proper seals could be used not just reliant on grease proof paper and Hermetite 🏍
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Yes they were Clive. But the clutch side was horizontal. Never leaked . I still have the impact screw driver needed to undo the Philips headed bolts.
 

Ern

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The leaks were corrosion prevention, and the rear two cylinders used to tend to sieze up in the summer, I wanted to buy one but could not raise the £25.
I had mine for about a fortnight What a dreadful thing it was. The previous Sunbeam S8 was even worse. Interesting bikes but oh dear. I must have been barking. A couple of Dominators and a Goldie 500 later, I knew what proper bikes were like.
 

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