Wales may impose ‘visitor levy’ on overnight guests

Nov 11, 2009
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I've just seen this article in The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2022/sep/20/wales-may-impose-visitor-levy-on-overnight-guests. It appears that it would apply to campsites. The Welsh Government have opened a Consultation process, more details can be found here: https://gov.wales/a-visitor-levy-for-wales
Visitor taxes are fairly common in other countries but although they are periodically discussed in UK that’s as far as it goes. Be interesting to see how far this one runs. Hope it doesn’t mean tgat going to see my son will see me taxed. It costs me enough on beers as it is 😂
 
Jul 18, 2017
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Visitor taxes are fairly common in other countries but although they are periodically discussed in UK that’s as far as it goes. Be interesting to see how far this one runs. Hope it doesn’t mean tgat going to see my son will see me taxed. It costs me enough on beers as it is 😂
I guess it will also apply to people staying in their caravans, but if staying with relatives I cannot see how they will be able to tax a person. We gave up visiting Wales sometime ago as France and Spain were more appealing and cost of a pitch a lot cheaper.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I guess it will also apply to people staying in their caravans, but if staying with relatives I cannot see how they will be able to tax a person. We gave up visiting Wales sometime ago as France and Spain were more appealing and cost of a pitch a lot cheaper.
Don’t they charge local taxes in France and Spain, whilst not visitor taxes they are in addition to the national taxes.

Having lived in Wales for four years we still enjoy visiting the Principality and I’m pleased that people seem to prefer the South West or abroad as it keeps Wales less crowded.

My comment wrt my son was TIC.
 
Mar 24, 2014
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I guess it will also apply to people staying in their caravans, but if staying with relatives I cannot see how they will be able to tax a person. We gave up visiting Wales sometime ago as France and Spain were more appealing and cost of a pitch a lot cheaper.
The intro on the Consultation site says "We are proposing that a visitor levy will represent a small additional charge that will apply to stays in overnight, commercially-let visitor accommodation, so staying with relatives won't be an issue.
 
Feb 13, 2022
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I do have sympathy for the point of view that effectively locals are paying for tourist infrastructure. But on the other hand don't business rates and and campsite licences pay towards this? Not necessarily against this if it isn't excessive.
 

PTA

Mar 5, 2020
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How would it operate?
Quite difficult to enforce I would imagine.
I know some countries operate. such a system, but within the UK......?
A sliding scale based on length of stay?
Hotel, campsite surcharges?
An administrative nightmare!
 
Nov 11, 2009
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How would it operate?
Quite difficult to enforce I would imagine.
I know some countries operate. such a system, but within the UK......?
A sliding scale based on length of stay?
Hotel, campsite surcharges?
An administrative nightmare!
If other countries can manage it why should UK seem to find it so difficult. Not that I support it though.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Perhaps because it's not crossing international borders but is internal within one country?
Nothing really to do with borders as like some areas of England can charge second homes extra council tax, this Welsh Government proposal is for a council levy charged on overnight visitor stays. It is within the scope of the Welsh Government’s powers. It would be discretionary to each council area. So those with few numbers may not charge it whereas the more popular ( and crowded) areas may charge it. It’s only a consultation so be interesting to see how it plays out.
 
Jan 3, 2012
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I also had to check because we go to wales on friday near Builth Wells for a break we have to ring up tonight for key code and ask if anything change to our booking .
 
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Nov 11, 2009
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I also had to check because we go to wales on friday near Builth Wells for a break we have to ring up tonight for key code and ask if anything change to our booking .
It’s only a consultation and even if it were to go ahead it’s unlikely to be introduced until 2024. Panic ye not BB. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿
 
Mar 14, 2005
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I have learned to be quite sceptical about items published like this as in the past, it's often been a slow news day, and reporters have had to trawl through the trash bin to find a story to fill the paper, some papers are worse than others but none are exempt.

However it does seem this story is indeed current, as the Welsh government have published a document about the consultation dated 20 Sept 22.

As it is apparently only aimed at commercial overnight accomodation, it would be quite easy for the Welsh govt to have it added to the tax returns of businesses. And of course businesses would almost certainly add an element to their customer charges.

For the record I don't support it.
 

Sam Vimes

Moderator
Sep 7, 2020
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Tourism tax is always a subject for a good debate about the pros and cons. Pick you own side.

From my own persective I have no problem with the idea provided any moneys collected are invested sensibly in those areas from which it was gathered.

Tourism has put a considerable strain on the environment and resources here on Skye and funds have had to be made available from somewhere to accommodate the increased numbers.

Council tax on holiday homes and B&Bs is a complex issue ranging from free of tax to discounted rates. Some may even be subjected to Business Taxes. However, I wouldn't be at all suprised to find there are ways around paying them. There have been a number of holiday homes built in our community which always start out as being accommodation for the owners, yet very quickly, if not immediately, find there way onto AirBnB for example.

We've come across a tourism tax whilst travelling. First time in Malta/Gozo which was 5 Euros each at the first point of stay. You kept the receipt and showed it to the other accommodation as you went around.

Recently we've just applied for our NZ visas which includes a tourism levy of NZD35 each.

We don't consider these charges excessive when you consider that this is a very small percentage of how much the vacation actually costs.

It would be nice to know that these taxes went into the right places.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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I think a lot depends on the amount to be charged per night. I think it France it was under 50p a night, but knowing Rip off Britain here it will probably be as much as possible. :unsure:
 
Nov 11, 2009
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I think that the concept of such a tax is fine if as Sam says it’s revenue is directed to where it is required. An example of an area under stress this year was north wales where lack of facilities led to problems. If it helps to make the visits more pleasant then fine. Brits abroad have been paying them for years but clearly we are more tolerant when visiting overseas.

.
 
Jul 18, 2017
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I think that the concept of such a tax is fine if as Sam says it’s revenue is directed to where it is required. An example of an area under stress this year was north wales where lack of facilities led to problems. If it helps to make the visits more pleasant then fine. Brits abroad have been paying them for years but clearly we are more tolerant when visiting overseas.

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If the tax is a reasonable amount then I think no one will object to to paying it, but by the same token then they should not be charging for people to use the loo or similar. Nothing worst when you are desperate and you do not have the correct change.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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If the tax is a reasonable amount then I think no one will object to to paying it, but by the same token then they should not be charging for people to use the loo or similar. Nothing worst when you are desperate and you do not have the correct change.
Works fine on my phone and iPad.
 

Sam Vimes

Moderator
Sep 7, 2020
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If the tax is a reasonable amount then I think no one will object to to paying it, but by the same token then they should not be charging for people to use the loo or similar. Nothing worst when you are desperate and you do not have the correct change.
The question will be what is deemed reasonable. There is more to a tourism tax than just providing toilets. Roads have to be maintained; rubbish and recycling has to be collected; water has to be provided etc

Toilets are a real issue. The Highland Council reduced the number of Public Conveniences and then asked for organisations such as our Community Hall to open our toilets to the public. For this they would give us a grant which wasn't sufficient to cover the running costs. Other communties make it work somehow. I wish I knew how, although those I've used are spotless and have an honesty box.

The lack of Public Conveniences has another issue which we're all aware of and that's irresponsible tourists doing their #1s and #2s on croft land and other public spaces. Only a couple of weeks ago we had a french car stop a few metres from our house and the guy walked down the road a few hundrend metres and dropped his pants. This mess in places has to be cleared up. I could go on more but enough.

Public Conveniences have to be paid for somehow. One of our biggest tourist spots which was subject to the above plus irresponsible parking has had a large investment recently for a bigger car park -actually a real car park other than just stopping on the roadside - plus toilets. The toilets are chargeable and will take contactless cards.
 
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