Pnumatic jockey wheel tyre

Jun 16, 2020
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I think the maximum load rating is 100kg so no good for us, but it does look okay for the majority of caravans.

You can get industrial ones for factory trucks with higher loadings. But often the hub is off centre. I used to have one and it was a simple job to swap the hubs. also they are often bright yellow.

John
 
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Nov 17, 2005
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You can get industrial ones for factory trucks with higher loadings. But often the hub is off centre. I used to have one and it was a simple job to swap the hubs. also they are often bright yellow.

John
Can you please advise where I can buy one of these.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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There are lots on Amazon and EBay. Make sure that the yoke on your assemble is wide enough and that you get the right axle length and diameter. Also needle bearings, Personally I think the plastic hubs are OK, but metal one are available.

On mine the axle is a little too long. But easy fixed with a couple of large washers.

Look how cheap this one is, says 135kg load, but does not look as though it has a bearing.


John
 
Nov 17, 2005
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There are lots on Amazon and EBay. Make sure that the yoke on your assemble is wide enough and that you get the right axle length and diameter. Also needle bearings, Personally I think the plastic hubs are OK, but metal one are available.

On mine the axle is a little too long. But easy fixed with a couple of large washers.

Look how cheap this one is, says 135kg load, but does not look as though it has a bearing.


John
Many thanks John
 
Apr 6, 2017
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I use a pneumatic jockey wheel as it rolls better than the solid types, but do agree punctures are major reason for sticking with the solid versions.
To minimise the dreaded puncture problem I used some "Stan's no tubes" sealer. This stuff was developed for mountain bikes to make tyres tubeless and the sealer works well on jockey wheels. It helps with sealing the tyre to the rim as well.
I sure there is other sealers available.
 
Jun 16, 2020
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I use a pneumatic jockey wheel as it rolls better than the solid types, but do agree punctures are major reason for sticking with the solid versions.
To minimise the dreaded puncture problem I used some "Stan's no tubes" sealer. This stuff was developed for mountain bikes to make tyres tubeless and the sealer works well on jockey wheels. It helps with sealing the tyre to the rim as well.
I sure there is other sealers available.

I often wondered if that would worn, nice to know.

John
 
Mar 14, 2005
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I use a pneumatic jockey wheel as it rolls better than the solid types, but do agree punctures are major reason for sticking with the solid versions.
To minimise the dreaded puncture problem I used some "Stan's no tubes" sealer. This stuff was developed for mountain bikes to make tyres tubeless and the sealer works well on jockey wheels. It helps with sealing the tyre to the rim as well.
I sure there is other sealers available.
I have never entirely worked out why jockey wheel tyres are so often reported as having punctures, They do so little distance compared road tyres, punctures rates should be even lower for jockey wheels. What I have often witnessed is a jockey wheel tyre that isn't inflated enough, and that makes far more likely for its bead to be pushed away from the rim causing even more air to leak. I suppose that begs teh question what cause the tyre to deflate in the first place?

I have a suspicion that the manufacturing of JW's is not taken as seriously as for normal road wheels, and there are more imperfections in the edges of the rim which makes them more susceptible to leaking, so a tyre sealant might well do a good job.
 
Nov 6, 2005
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I have never entirely worked out why jockey wheel tyres are so often reported as having punctures, They do so little distance compared road tyres, punctures rates should be even lower for jockey wheels. What I have often witnessed is a jockey wheel tyre that isn't inflated enough, and that makes far more likely for its bead to be pushed away from the rim causing even more air to leak. I suppose that begs teh question what cause the tyre to deflate in the first place?

I have a suspicion that the manufacturing of JW's is not taken as seriously as for normal road wheels, and there are more imperfections in the edges of the rim which makes them more susceptible to leaking, so a tyre sealant might well do a good job.
Jockey wheels on hard standings can pick up all manner of sharp stones or foreign objects - but the tyre itself is built to such a low cost compared to car/caravan road tyres.
 
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Years ago it was a real concern on building sites with wheel barrows. Solid wheels could not cope with rough surfaces, pneumatic got punctures virtually every day. Wiser management kept a few spares In readiness. But the production lost was clear and expensive. Puncture proof wheels are a godsend.

Jockey wheels are made to the same rubbish standards.

John
 
Jul 18, 2017
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It must be remembered that the jockey wheel pneumatic tyre as a lot of weight on it and if the tyre is not pumped up hard, it will twist on the rim resulting in it deflating. Twisting also damages the rim of the tyre and of course air then leaks out so not necessary deflating because of a stone etc.
 
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It will be very similar to the nose load, which the tyre should be more than capable of handling.
Our nose weight can be up to 150kg and the pneumatic will not handle that sort of weight as we found out to our cost! I am not sure of the load rating on the pneumatic tyres?
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Our nose weight can be up to 150kg and the pneumatic will not handle that sort of weight as we found out to our cost! I am not sure of the load rating on the pneumatic tyres?
But was the pneumatic tyre an original fit by the manufacturer? IF it was, and the caravan is designed to have a 150kg nose load the manufacture or more correctly the dealer would be at fault if its not up to the job.
 
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But was the pneumatic tyre an original fit by the manufacturer? IF it was, and the caravan is designed to have a 150kg nose load the manufacture or more correctly the dealer would be at fault if its not up to the job.
No it was not. I don't think any British caravan manufacturer has fitted a jockey wheel assembly with a pneumatic tyre to their caravan.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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No it was not. I don't think any British caravan manufacturer has fitted a jockey wheel assembly with a pneumatic tyre to their caravan.
Given the pneumatic tyre was not an original fit, then who ever fitted it should have checked the caravans nose load limit was within the tyres rated capacity. If it was and it still failed (other than punctures) then that is matter that should have been taken up with the supplier.
 
Jun 20, 2005
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Given the pneumatic tyre was not an original fit, then who ever fitted it should have checked the caravans nose load limit was within the tyres rated capacity. If it was and it still failed (other than punctures) then that is matter that should have been taken up with the supplier.
Prof,
I appreciate your sentiments . As you may know / indicate, the OEM jockey wheels are non pneumatic. The aftermarket pneumatic tyres are basically a puncture waiting to happen. The real problem for us guys is we cannot afford to have a punctured jockey wheel whilst moving into a pitch if others are awaiting our manoeuvre. weights or not , their failure rate amongst caravanners is appalling. Even I have tried them and they are a disaster. The solid wide tyre /wheel as described by others is imo the best way to go.
 
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