Tyrons

Mar 20, 2019
17
0
0
Visit site
We have Tyrons fitted to our 1997 van and are looking to replace with a new 2019 model.

One of the dealers said they generally do not fit tyrons anymore as the alloy wheels have built up rims?

I was wondering what peoples views on this where if you should still fit them?
 
Nov 16, 2015
10,626
2,940
40,935
Visit site
Hi LeMans, I had a set of Tyron band fitted on my Coachman as new and when I changed tyres I had them refitted to the wheels again, (Alloys ). I would not bother again as trying to find a mobile fitter that can handle these is a problem, I think it is only Kwik fit "Mobile" that do the fitting and not all the mobiles carry the kit and the extra long Allen key.

I bought the mobile kit as I used to tour in France a lot. As a just in case then I could remove the bands myself, in case of a puncture.

I have now bought a Tyre Pal , monitoring system for the van now and I can monitor the pressures and temps, as we are going along. Probably a better buy than Tyron band, I suppose I now have a belts and Braces system.
Hope this helps.
 
May 24, 2014
3,687
763
20,935
Visit site
For the first time in eons, I have a caravan without the Tyrons. I concur with the previous post, half the tyre fitters havent the foggiest about them.
 

Mel

Moderator
Mar 17, 2007
5,408
1,359
25,935
Visit site
Our first van had Tyrons fitted, only because we were as green as grass and went with the Sales patter. Absolute pain when we had to have a new tyre because of a puncture. As others said, had to get Kiki fit out. Never bothered since. Mind you, never had a tyre blow out either.
Mel
 
Mar 8, 2009
1,851
334
19,935
Visit site
Had the tyrepals fitted a few years now, just a word of warning Hutch ..... you might just get concerned about the rise in temp on the van tyres when motoring, but if mine are typical they get 'quite' hot on the van and alarming to start with but is the norm. I had to raise the alarm level after a couple of trips. But certainly compared to this happening (on a van a year or few back!) they are helpful. (Ps - this wheel had tyron band on!)
10june04002-1.jpg
 
Feb 23, 2018
889
66
10,935
Visit site
LeMans said:
We have Tyrons fitted to our 1997 van and are looking to replace with a new 2019 model.

One of the dealers said they generally do not fit tyrons anymore as the alloy wheels have built up rims?

I was wondering what peoples views on this where if you should still fit them?

i have a 2018 model year van with alloy wheels. I was offered Tyron bands by the dealer; I declined, as I saw no benefit to them, but there seemed to be no issue with fitting them to the alloys. In hindsight I'm glad I declined as I've not heard many positives from Tyron users on the forum.
 
Feb 23, 2018
889
66
10,935
Visit site
EH52ARH said:
I have now bought a Tyre Pal , monitoring system for the van now and I can monitor the pressures and temps, as we are going along....

I find that I always need to re-inflate the tyres before a trip - how hard is it to remove the valve stem sensor to inflate? It looks like a fiddly pain to attach them.
 
Nov 11, 2009
20,547
6,342
50,935
Visit site
Gabsgrandad said:
Had the tyrepals fitted a few years now, just a word of warning Hutch ..... you might just get concerned about the rise in temp on the van tyres when motoring, but if mine are typical they get 'quite' hot on the van and alarming to start with but is the norm. I had to raise the alarm level after a couple of trips. But certainly compared to this happening (on a van a year or few back!) they are helpful. (Ps - this wheel had tyron band on!)
10june04002-1.jpg

I guess that the Tyson’s were not designed to prevent a catastrophic bow out or if the driver should fail to notice a deflating tyre that overheated or was just driven on too long whilst shredding itself. Their main purpose was to hold the deflated tyre on the rim until the vehicle could be safely parked up.

I had a nearside van tyre let go in my early days. We were doing 60 mph on a dual carriageway when there was a noise a bit akin to being buzzed by a low aircraft. Looked back and saw tyrev debris. Van stayed steady.
 
Mar 14, 2005
17,758
3,167
50,935
Visit site
The tyre band concept has been debated several times in the forum. Tyre bands have been available for decades. For some types of wheel and for some applications they may have proven benefits, but there is no evidence base they have offered any benefit for caravanners over the standard rims and tyres fitted by manufactures.

Tyre bands primary claim is they are supposed to prevent the bead of a deflated tyre form dropping into the central valley of a wheel rim. There is little doubt they would do that, but that presupposes the the wheel rim would allow that to happen. Certainly in recent years caravan wheel rims have a ridge formed in rim which does basically the same thing, so a tyre band is not strictly necessary.

The band manufacturers have failed to provide any scientific test results that show there is a real benefit to their product. All of the advertising films and pictures fail to show what would have happened if a band had not been fitted.

I suggest that if these devices had proven to be a real safety advantage, then they would have become a legal requirement rather like seat belts and remote tyre pressure warning systems. Both wheel rim and tyre manufacturers and a large number of after market producers would have made similar products.

In fact RTPWS are demonstrably better than tyre bands, as it catches the early warnings of low tyre pressure. which gives you a better chance of preventing tyre deflation in teh first place.

I will leave you to draw your own conclusions about what that all could mean.

If you decide to fit tyre bands , as far as I know there is no negative effect to safety, but as others have pointed out already it can cause problems when needing a tyre change, as many tyre fitters do not know how to deal with them. Just consider f you are en route to a holiday destination and you need a tyre change, how much more difficult could such a device make the job.

There are some downsides, first of all there's a cost involved, the will reduce your available pay load, and increase the caravans un-sprung mass. If they are not fitted correctly they can slip inside teh wheel and cause it to go out of balance causing quite severe vibrations that can damage the caravan.

On last point, If you are convinced enough to have them fitted to your caravan, then you should also have them fitted to your car. Ask other owner if they have done so and if not why not?

You can assume I see no benefit to fitting tyre bands. but if it make you feel more comfortable then its your choice.
 
Nov 16, 2015
10,626
2,940
40,935
Visit site
ProfJohnL said:
, the will reduce your available pay load, and increase the caravans un-sprung mass. If they are not fitted correctly they can slip inside teh wheel and cause it to go out of balance causing quite severe vibrations that can damage the caravan.

They weigh less than a kilo for the pair, and there is no real way they can slip inside the wheel to cause an out of balance situation , they cannot rotate inside the wheel as there is a cut out area where the tyre valve goes. .
 
Sep 29, 2016
1,805
214
19,935
Visit site
My caravan came with Tyron bands, I have not encountered a situation that could allow me take take a stance on 'good or bad'.

Common sense tells me that they are not worth paying for as an extra.
 
Sep 24, 2008
919
238
19,135
Visit site
We had Tyron bands on alloys and had to have tyre changed. Quick fix could not do it so took it to local guy who said never done them before but will have a go. Gave him the tools and instructions and went back to him about two hours later. Now there were two of them doing it, eventualy they succeded and replied hope they do ot get any more..Now have had three caravans with Tyrons with no problems.
 
Nov 16, 2015
10,626
2,940
40,935
Visit site
Robert_374373903 said:
We had Tyron bands on alloys and had to have tyre changed. Quick fix could not do it so took it to local guy who said never done them before but will have a go. Gave him the tools and instructions and went back to him about two hours later. Now there were two of them doing it, eventualy they succeded and replied hope they do ot get any more..Now have had three caravans with Tyrons with no problems.

It is such an easy procedure to remove and refit the bands, for an engineer. :woohoo:

But when we are caravanning trying to find one is like waiting for a bus.
 
Nov 16, 2015
10,626
2,940
40,935
Visit site
CustardAvenger said:
EH52ARH said:
I have now bought a Tyre Pal , monitoring system for the van now and I can monitor the pressures and temps, as we are going along....

I find that I always need to re-inflate the tyres before a trip - how hard is it to remove the valve stem sensor to inflate? It looks like a fiddly pain to attach them.

Not sure yet as only just fitted them, GabsGrandadad might help. , my tyres have always held their pressures, check the internal valves are fully screwed in, that can cause a leak.
As an aircraft apprentice, we were told the valve cap was the seal , not the valve core.so I always have metal hex top valve caps.
 
Oct 12, 2013
3,037
4
0
Visit site
CustardAvenger said:
EH52ARH said:
I have now bought a Tyre Pal , monitoring system for the van now and I can monitor the pressures and temps, as we are going along....

I find that I always need to re-inflate the tyres before a trip - how hard is it to remove the valve stem sensor to inflate? It looks like a fiddly pain to attach them.

Have you not got a slow puncture ?
 
Mar 8, 2009
1,851
334
19,935
Visit site
One experience we had Alistair initially was removing them, (in fact destroyed 1 or 2 because had to use 'tools'. ) They do tend to seize on , found out a smearing of something like 'molyslip' on the threads facilitates easy removal. Don't be over 'enthusiastic' with it or there can be danger of blockage to the detector.
 
Feb 23, 2018
889
66
10,935
Visit site
Craigyoung said:
CustardAvenger said:
EH52ARH said:
I have now bought a Tyre Pal , monitoring system for the van now and I can monitor the pressures and temps, as we are going along....

I find that I always need to re-inflate the tyres before a trip - how hard is it to remove the valve stem sensor to inflate? It looks like a fiddly pain to attach them.

Have you not got a slow puncture ?

I'm only talking a few PSI... but its enough to make me re-inflate them. For example between September and January, the pressure dropped from 61 PSI to 50-odd. From January's trip to the service at the end of Feb, it dropped 1 PSI,
 
Nov 16, 2015
10,626
2,940
40,935
Visit site
A change in ambient temperature will give a few psi, change. From September until February Mine dropped 5 psi. . Not bothered over that length of time, Caravan being serviced on Wednesday, so will be removing the Tyre pal sensors and refitting, to add a touch of lube to the valve stems.
 
Jun 15, 2018
31
0
0
Visit site
I recently viewed a You-tube Vlog posted by an Australian lady whom had just suffered a tire puncture followed by a catastrophic tire off. All the plastic trim and much of the base materials of the caravan was hugely damaged. It looked like a bomb had gone off. I mused that there had been little to no feed-back indicating a problem through the cars controls. In fact, the disconnect between the drivers senses and the crisis going on at the rear was so complete, it simply cannot be believed. How strange! I viewed another Vlog of some chap in the US with the same thing. I became convinced that we need to know if the caravan has a puncture and we need to know it fast. Not when the tire is flaying about like a medieval horror device. I got a Tyre-pal.
 
Nov 11, 2009
20,547
6,342
50,935
Visit site
Ironduke2018 said:
I recently viewed a You-tube Vlog posted by an Australian lady whom had just suffered a tire puncture followed by a catastrophic tire off. All the plastic trim and much of the base materials of the caravan was hugely damaged. It looked like a bomb had gone off. I mused that there had been little to no feed-back indicating a problem through the cars controls. In fact, the disconnect between the drivers senses and the crisis going on at the rear was so complete, it simply cannot be believed. How strange! I viewed another Vlog of some chap in the US with the same thing. I became convinced that we need to know if the caravan has a puncture and we need to know it fast. Not when the tire is flaying about like a medieval horror device. I got a Tyre-pal.

You are correct. The blow out that I had did give me warning as it sounded like a fast low pass by an aircraft. I then saw my nearside caravan tyre shredding and the front window line of the caravan went inclined. I was doing about 60 mph on a dual carriageway towing with a MK 1 Mondeo estate that had none of the stability aids possessed by modern cars. The caravan had one of the Bulldog spring arm stabilisers. Yet apart from the tyre noise the car gave no indication that the caravan had lost its tyre. Pity is that these days I probably wouldn’t hear it anyway :)
 
Mar 14, 2005
69
14
18,585
Visit site
This topic was running a couple of years ago if I remember - age sadly dulls the memory! I have clipped a curb twice and both times resulted in a blow out. The first was in Sheffield in the early 90s when Tyron bands were a big thing. The second was 2 years ago in Natters in Austria - very narrow village and a car came round a corner in the middle of the road. Both times, I was able to drive until I found a safe place to change the wheel. I carry a Tyron band fitting kit with me and set the Austrians a challenge. I said that if the British tyre technicians can change a tyre with a Tyron band, surely the Austrians can. It was all done with good humour and they rose to the challenge. Interestingly, the bands on my current caravan were fitted by a mobile tyre fitting service which I found online.

Obviously, I cannot say what would have happened if I had not had Tyron bands fitted but, for me, they give me peace of mind - although I recognise some would argue that my peace of mind is an illusion.
 
Mar 14, 2005
17,758
3,167
50,935
Visit site
Hello Bob,

Peace of mind is not an illusion, its very real.

But whether tyre bands do make a difference under a set of circumstances is open to debate, but the named manufacturer has consistently failed to offer any conclusive evidence their product actually does improve the outcomes of tyre failures. It also depend on the type of failure. Some types of failure tyre bands would not offer any safety advantage.

Its always better to reduce the probability of a failure by proper inspection and maintenance, and early warning of tyre deflation, so pressure monitors are probably more effective.

Obviously sudden loss of pressure due to a collision won't be picked up before the event, but did your bands help after the event is not clear.
 
Mar 14, 2005
69
14
18,585
Visit site
Thanks Prof.
I totally agree that they would probably not help in a wear & tear situation but in a blow out, I found them reassuring. I only rely on them for blow outs. For the other situations, I regularly check tyre pressure, tyre wear and wheel nuts. We are away for long periods at a time in Europe (and Morocco on the last trip), so I normally check the tyres and wheels every 3 weeks for so.
Bob
 
Aug 15, 2017
72
0
4,580
Visit site
Bob_5041432 said:
This topic was running a couple of years ago if I remember - age sadly dulls the memory! I have clipped a curb twice and both times resulted in a blow out ....

Out of interest, what speed do you reckon you were doing when clipped the kerb, and was the blowout at that moment, or else how long after? Kerb clipping, or shocks that are the equivalent of, is obviously best avoided but must happen here and there quite often at lowish speeds so I was surprised to hear it can cause (or lead to an imminent) blow out.
 

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts