CRV decision.Which Model

Jul 30, 2007
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Hi.
Not getting on with the Volkswagen Tiguan as a towcar and have decided to go back to the Honda CRV.2.2 Diesel
In the past,ive towed with an early 54 plate and also a 07 plate and was extremely happy with both vehicles.
Im just wondering if I should pay a little bit more and get one of the newer models (around 13/14 plate).
I do like the look of them and really pleased with the large boot.
The only thing that may stand in the way is ive heard that the suspension is a little soft and was wondering if anyone here has towed with one of the newer models and could agree/disagree with this.
I would be looking at the "EX" model,manual,2.2 diesel.
Thanks. .
 
Nov 11, 2009
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GeorgeandAde said:
Hi.
Not getting on with the Volkswagen Tiguan as a towcar and have decided to go back to the Honda CRV.2.2 Diesel
In the past,ive towed with an early 54 plate and also a 07 plate and was extremely happy with both vehicles.
Im just wondering if I should pay a little bit more and get one of the newer models (around 13/14 plate).
I do like the look of them and really pleased with the large boot.
The only thing that may stand in the way is ive heard that the suspension is a little soft and was wondering if anyone here has towed with one of the newer models and could agree/disagree with this.
I would be looking at the "EX" model,manual,2.2 diesel.
Thanks. .

Cannot advise on the Honda although as you probably know anyway they are consistently getting good ratings for reliability. Strangely enough we are shortly off to look at a new Jazz as the 13 year old Note is showing its age although still going well and still on original exhaust too.

What don’t you like about the Tiguan?
 
Jul 30, 2007
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Weve got a 13 plate Jazz.Excellent car.Reasonably roomy,reliable,economical.(travelled in it last year from Bristol to Torquay and it returned just over 54 mpg).
Found the Tiguans boot is too small,I cant get on with the electric handbrake when towing,and first gear is very low when solo.
It tows well,reasonably economical,but not the ideal car for my needs.
I believe the much newer Tiguans(well out of my price range)have a bigger boot.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Thank you. I can’t stand electronic handbrakes. Had one on a XC70 which was located low down on the RHS of the console. How ergonomic is that. Plus I like to gently engage and hold the handbrake when hitching up the van.
 
Sep 26, 2018
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To the contrary, I find the electric handbrake on the Kuga great when towing, because it reliably auto releases as you pull away so long as you're in gear, the clutch is easing out and the revs are at least 1500. One less thing to remove my attention from more important stuff...
 
Mar 14, 2005
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Getting back to the OP's question about the CRV and is its suspension too soft?

Every car manufacturer that lists their car as suitable for towing will have established that the loads applied by the trailer through the towbar are within the vehicles rated load values and will have set their suspension accordingly.

Providing the suspensions is not worn or damaged, then it will be perfectly adequate for the job and definitely not too soft to meet its technical specifications.

Any driver that suspects the cars suspension is too soft, should check the weights and noseloads of the trailer and of what is being carried in the car to ensure it does not exceed the car manufacturers specification.

There are some drivers who misguidedly think they know better than the cars manufacturer, and start to play with uprating suspension parts, Unfortunately these are modifications which are unnecessary, and should be reported to insurers, But also with some more recent vehicles, such changes to suspension settings can upset some modern cars Electronic Stability systems, providing them with false data rendering them more actually more dangerous.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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ProfJohnL said:
Getting back to the OP's question about the CRV and is its suspension too soft?

Every car manufacturer that lists their car as suitable for towing will have established that the loads applied by the trailer through the towbar are within the vehicles rated load values and will have set their suspension accordingly.

Providing the suspensions is not worn or damaged, then it will be perfectly adequate for the job and definitely not too soft to meet its technical specifications.

Any driver that suspects the cars suspension is too soft, should check the weights and noseloads of the trailer and of what is being carried in the car to ensure it does not exceed the car manufacturers specification.

There are some drivers who misguidedly think they know better than the cars manufacturer, and start to play with uprating suspension parts, Unfortunately these are modifications which are unnecessary, and should be reported to insurers, But also with some more recent vehicles, such changes to suspension settings can upset some modern cars Electronic Stability systems, providing them with false data rendering them more actually more dangerous.

Prof
What is your evidence that changes to suspension (springs/dampers) has actually rendered a car dangerous because it upset the electronic systems. Im not talking stupid suspension lifts or very low dropped ones either. just a uprating of springs and/or better quality dampers.

For my car Skoda fit uprated springs and dampers when Superbs are used in countries with rough roads. The modification also increases ride height slightly. IE Russia or India being examples. When I enquired at my dealer he contacted Skoda Technical UK who confirmed they could be fitted without any sensor or software changes but I would have to source them myself. In the end I decided not to go down that route.
 
May 7, 2012
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If you want reliability I would take the Honda. Living with the car is really a personal thing and if the Honda suits you better than that is almost certainly the best bet for you.
Personally I would go for the newest model you can afford.
The newer models might have a softer suspension but I am not aware of anyone having problems with it, and as with all cars, parts do wear out and the newer models tend to need less as the parts still have more life left in them.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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otherclive said:
Prof
What is your evidence that changes to suspension (springs/dampers) has actually rendered a car dangerous because it upset the electronic systems. Im not talking stupid suspension lifts or very low dropped ones either. just a uprating of springs and/or better quality dampers.

For my car Skoda fit uprated springs and dampers when Superbs are used in countries with rough roads. The modification also increases ride height slightly. IE Russia or India being examples. When I enquired at my dealer he contacted Skoda Technical UK who confirmed they could be fitted without any sensor or software changes but I would have to source them myself. In the end I decided not to go down that route.

Hello Clive,
Any car that has sensors that monitor ride height will have that signal being processed by some form of computer in the car, sometimes by several as in modern cars the systems seem to be highly integrated even in ways that may not seem obvious to the casual observer.

However one obvious one would be self leveling suspension, but another might well be some form of stability control system.

The systems will have been set up and calibrated for the manufacturers standard equipment that includes suspension and spring rates, and it might use data from the suspensions position indicators to reveal the lean of a vehicle due to lateral cornering forces.

When the measured lean exceeds a particular threshold the ESC might use that information to reduce the throttle to reduce speed to a safer rate.

If the the suspension has been stiffened so that given the same conditions the vehicle does not role as much, it would mean the conditions would have to be more severe for the systems threshold to be reached and that could take the vehicle beyond its safe operating envelope.

In another area, sometimes braking effort is controlled depending on the load in a vehicle., Again if the compression of the rear suspension is used to indicate applied load, any variation in the way the suspension moves may start to change the way the cars systems proportion braking effort.

With the car industries inexorableincreasing complexity of control systems in cars, any aftermarket change away from "EX Factory" standards is increasingly likely to have far wider implications across the vehicle's control systems and those affecting running gear are more likely to affect vehicle safety systems.
 
Jan 9, 2018
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I have had a CRV 2.2 Diesel automatic 2011 model (Euro4 I think) from new It has completed 87,000 miles to date and I have just returned from a 3,600 mile tow around Spain. Despite towing a 1500kg Coachman (auto gearbox limit) the car behaves impeccably. I normally do around 5,00 miles towing a year with no problems. On then recent Spain/France trip with numerous hills, mountains, heat , etc we never towed at less than 50 mph indicated (allowing for road conditions) MPG varied between 22 - 28 depending on the road and wind. I would add that I change the engine oil myself every 5,000 miles and have the auto box fluid changed every 2 - 3 years. The only fault occurred earlier this year when the EGR coolant pipe cracked which is not unkown on this car, but that is not a show stopper.. I have looked at new cars out of interest but decided I am better off with what I have for reliability and performance.
 

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