Suitable wood glue.

May 24, 2014
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Whilst getting bits done in the caravan in prep for the next trip, we found that a number, quite a few in fact, of the edge foils on the furniture doors are coming off. These are the glued on one inch wide strips that run round all the edges. Im thinking wood glue is perhaps the way to go, but to get any sort of pressure on these edges to allow the glue to cure would mean taking almost all the doors off, and i just havent time to do this. Im looking for suggestions for a glue suitable for the job, that bonds fairly quickly so as to hold the strips in place by its own grip. Gorilla seem to have a wood glue that looks like it may do the job, but as always, Im open to suggestions.

Affected are two drawers, both bed box doors, three cupboard doors and all four strips on the wardobe door. Add to that some of the fixed panels are affected too.Ridiculous isnt it, but then what else can you expect from a British made caravan.
 

JTQ

May 7, 2005
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Were they originally heat glued?
If you suspect that, then try, in a non critical area first, using a domestic iron to re iron them back.
Not with it set very hot. I would experiment a bit, using clean white paper separator between the iron and the finisher strip.

Even if not fixed originally with a heat setting glue, using one would be my initial test, as the strip can be bedded down solidly with a warm iron, probably followed with a cold rag rub as the glue cools.
 
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Nov 11, 2009
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Look at the CT1 range of adhesives. I’ve just used Power Grab n Bond to fix a slate nameplate to the house brickwork. It’s now part of the house. But it is suitable for many different material interfaces. They do a good range. White or clear CT1 would probably be most suitable.

https://www.ct1.com/
 
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Mar 14, 2005
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When replacing edging you will get better results if you can remove all the previous glue.

I think JTQ is probably right about the heat glue. Its certainly worth a try.

If not successful, then a contact glue would probably be best. A trick that guitar makers use to hold bent wood stips in place whilst the glue works, is to use lots of strips of masking tape across the piece. These can be pulled quite tight and I total will hold the edging in place, and probably still allow you to leave the doors in place.

I might use superglue for a small area but not a long length, and wood glue might not bond to the edging material very well. Often the edging is a printed plastic, or if you are replacing some edging, there will be residue from the previous glue so wood glue will not bond very well.
 
Sep 5, 2016
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Like the Prof says clean off the old glue because when you fix your strip if there is any old glue it will show through the strip in little bumps,
 
Oct 17, 2010
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Were they originally heat glued?
If you suspect that, then try, in a non critical area first, using a domestic iron to re iron them back.
Not with it set very hot. I would experiment a bit, using clean white paper separator between the iron and the finisher strip.

Even if not fixed originally with a heat setting glue, using one would be my initial test, as the strip can be bedded down solidly with a warm iron, probably followed with a cold rag rub as the glue cools.


If you use heat, normal PVA wood glue will do fine. Like the prof says clean every thing. It's easy to clean up as you go, don't know about you but I get contact glue everywhere.

The External grade works fine.
 
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Feb 13, 2020
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I would also try the 'iron' route first. Glueing can be a nightmare with something so 'on show' as doors. You need exactly enough to cover the edges, but you don't want it bleeding out. Which such as 'gorilla' glue will definitely do. Then its cleaning off, without causing damage!
 
May 24, 2014
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Thank you for all your responses and suggestions. The heat idea isnt really an option here as some of the edges you vouldnt possible get an iron to, that is withouth rmoving the doors in question, and on some of the fixed panels, you would struggle to get a cotton bud in.

Like others have said, I tend to stick myself to everything using contact adhesive, but if wood glue isnt going to work, then I guess thats my own option.

I did consider both a box of nails, and then more likely a box of matches.
 
Jan 31, 2018
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Evostick contact adhesive is the way to go-follow the instructions-had it happen to us once-perfect fix in 10 mins no need to apply pressure while drying.
 
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Mar 6, 2020
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Evostick contact adhesive rapid is the one for me, dont worry about it spilling out, it will just rub off with your finger when dry, be careful though you dont cut yourself on the edge if its sharp.
 
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Nov 6, 2006
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Use an iron on a medium heat, followed immediately by a wallpaper roller to make sure it bonds. Then apply the iron at an angle to any edges to double check they are bonded too. Its possible that this action will spread the edging very slightly, so dress gently with a very fine file.
 
Nov 16, 2015
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If your going to use the iron, remember to get every little bit of glue off of the sole plate, otherwise Mrs Thingy, will not be happy.
I have a modelling iron for heat shrinking model aircraft coverings. That would work well.
 
May 24, 2014
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Thank you for all the suggestions.

Iron? What does one of those look like? Im guessing its a lady gadget?

Im going to try the iron where i can gain access and contact adhesive where i cannot. Fingers crossed.
 
Nov 16, 2015
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Thank you for all the suggestions.

Iron? What does one of those look like? Im guessing its a lady gadget?

Im going to try the iron where i can gain access and contact adhesive where i cannot. Fingers crossed.
It's what SWMBO, puts too hot on your Masonic gloves, so she get s a new Frock for the ladies night.
 
Jan 19, 2002
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As other advice I have used a PVA either pressed down with a cloth while drying or strips of masking tape. using the cloth towards the edge helps to get excess glue squeezed out as otherwise the final result will be disappointingly 'lumpy'. On the surfaces where you have no edge to fit glue you could try warming gently with a hair dryer and using a dry cloth or roller to press into place while warm. In any event the 'veneer' is very thin so take care not to stretch or tear it while working.
 
May 24, 2014
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Ok. The iron was useless but at least I would recognise one again. Cant decide if wrong sort of glue or just not enough on to heat up.

What is working and working well is Evo-stik weatherproof wood adhesive fast setting. Grabs in 5 mins and cures in 24 hours.
 
Oct 17, 2010
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Ok. The iron was useless but at least I would recognise one again. Cant decide if wrong sort of glue or just not enough on to heat up.

What is working and working well is Evo-stik weatherproof wood adhesive fast setting. Grabs in 5 mins and cures in 24 hours.
That's the one " Stronger that the wood itself" Good stuff.
 

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