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Atkinson cycle engines

Jun 20, 2005
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Has anyone towed with these petrol engines?
They seem to be used mainly by Japanese and Korean manufacturers in hybrid vehicles. Looking at the animations there seem to be a lot of “big end “bearings.
 
Sep 29, 2016
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That's news to me DD, very interesting and enlightening, good post old chap.
:)
 
Nov 16, 2015
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It is not quite as complex as the Bristol Centarus, 18 cylinder Two row, sleeve valve engine I had a happy six months on. . :p
 
Nov 11, 2009
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Guzzilazz said:
EH52ARH said:
It is not quite as complex as the Bristol Centarus, 18 cylinder Two row, sleeve valve engine I had a happy six months on. . :p
Or the Deltic…
:lol:
My first job after completing an Application Course was to manage the Turbine and ICE shops in Devonport. We had a steady stream of Deltics, Paxman Ventura and Valenta plus ASR1 to overhaul. Most of them were problematic in one way or another.

Then when I returned to the Naval College the dear Stirling engine was thought to be the answer to the submariners dream of silent running.
 
Mar 14, 2005
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otherclive said:
My first job after completing an Application Course was to manage the Turbine and ICE shops in Devonport. We had a steady stream of Deltics, Paxman Ventura and Valenta plus ASR1 to overhaul. Most of them were problematic in one way or another.

Then when I returned to the Naval College the dear Stirling engine was thought to be the answer to the submariners dream of silent running.
Nice simple external combustion engine, very quiet, but hopelessly inefficient, and difficult to scale up from small models to produce practical output powers. Various attempts to improve them including pressurising the internal volume, but I don't know of anything bigger than about 40HP, .

The victorians had a good use for them,

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&source=images&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjytcrx_ZnkAhVBTBoKHS1DCXgQjRx6BAgBEAQ&url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MTIyb2ycv4&psig=AOvVaw2VVLAs0ovob7yCYDUQfGhL&ust=1566683660806625
they made dtove top versions to drive a a fan to circulate warm air around a room. Modern equivalents use a peltier thermo electric chip powering an electric motor.
 
Nov 11, 2009
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ProfJohnL said:
otherclive said:
My first job after completing an Application Course was to manage the Turbine and ICE shops in Devonport. We had a steady stream of Deltics, Paxman Ventura and Valenta plus ASR1 to overhaul. Most of them were problematic in one way or another.

Then when I returned to the Naval College the dear Stirling engine was thought to be the answer to the submariners dream of silent running.
Nice simple external combustion engine, very quiet, but hopelessly inefficient, and difficult to scale up from small models to produce practical output powers. Various attempts to improve them including pressurising the internal volume, but I don't know of anything bigger than about 40HP, .

The victorians had a good use for them,

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&source=images&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjytcrx_ZnkAhVBTBoKHS1DCXgQjRx6BAgBEAQ&url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MTIyb2ycv4&psig=AOvVaw2VVLAs0ovob7yCYDUQfGhL&ust=1566683660806625
they made dtove top versions to drive a a fan to circulate warm air around a room. Modern equivalents use a peltier thermo electric chip powering an electric motor.
Thanks Prof. The Swedish Gotland class have a 75kw Stirling powering a generator. They’ve been developing them since the early 1980s. Horse for courses I guess.
 

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